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Full text of "North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]"





I. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/northcarolinachr57unit 



North Caroli 

Christian Advocate 




ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 



Thursday, January 4, 1912 



























Ws m\h % Nnti 

"To the sad requiem of the wailing wind, 
'Mid tears which fall from out a sombre 

sky> 

We bid the past adieu with bitter sigh 
As the worn year reluctant drops behind. 
The silver cord is loosed, no more to bind 

The ill-used, well-used days; e'en as we 
cry 

It snaps, and so another year must die, 
To the sad Wailing of the haunting wind. 



"But harden to these chimes sweetly sing- 
ing 

Of future days, new weefe, and months 
and years, 

And bury with the dead Past all its 
fears; 

The day star in the East new hope is bring- 
ing, 

The wondrous hour that sets earth's joy- 
bells ringing 
Cradles a gladsome life, unmixed with 

tears. " —Selected. 


















PROPOSED NEW DORMITORY, GREENSBORO FEMALE COLLEGE. 




Shall we turn them away, or shall w< 
build and take them In — the Methodla 
girls of North Carolina who desire 1 
be educated In their own church college 
At present we are turning them away b; 
the score, but we have secured plan, 
for a new dormitory ( a picture of whlcl 
adorns this page), which we will buil< 
as seen as the money can be secured. 

The cost of the dormitory, furnlshet 
and ready for occupancy, will be $25,000 
and we hope to secure this amount b; 
the following plan: Ten churches am 
ten individuals in each conference builc 
a room at a cost of $500.00 each. The re 
malning $5000.00 to be secured in smal 
contributions from a number of people. 

The name of the individual or churcl 
building a room will be placed on tn< 
door of the room so that students ma; 
know whose generosity thoughtfully pro 
vided facilities for their education. 

Subscriptions may be made payable 1 
desired, in four semi-annual installment 

Any person who will build a room, # 
is willing to contribute any amount, how 
ever small, will confer a favor by com 
munlcatlng with W. M. Curtis, Secretary 
and Treasurer, Greensboro, N. C. 

The following have agreed to build I 
room: 

Faculty and Students G. P. C; Wes 
Market Church, Greensboro, N. C; 1 
member of West Market Church, Greens 
boro, N. C; First Methodist Church 
Wilson, N. C; Tryon Street Methodla 
Church, Charlotte, N. C; Grace Church 
Wilmington, N. C; Member of 6th Stree 
Church, Wilmington, N. C; Membe 
Grace Church, Wilmington, N. C; Mem 
ber Methodist Church, Clayton, N. C. 
Washington Street Church, High Point 
N. C; Member of St. Paul's Church 
Goldsboro, N. C; Miscellaneous subscrip 
tions, $12,000.00; Total subscribed to date 
$17,500.00. 



® 



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WRITE TODAY TO 

THE ADVOCATE PRESS 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



0 




ttan^twocate 



ESTABLISHED 1S5S 



H. M. BLAIR. Editor 


Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. 


Church, South 


$1 .50 Per Annum in Advance 


Volume LVII. 


GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 4, 19 


2 


Number 1 




The official record of the Greensboro city court 
speaks volumes for the cause of temperance as 
compared to that of Danville, where the saloons 
are in full blast. During the Christmas season, 
from Saturday till Monday, the police of Danville, 
rounded up nearly sixty cases of drunk and dis- 
orderly while in Greensboro during the same period 
there were only six cases. It will not do for our 
people to fail to note a contrast like this. Even 
if there are some blind tigers here, it seems that 
they do not produce drunks as do the open saloons. 
It would be hard to estimate the value of our pro- 
hibition law, notwithstanding the disadvantage of 
the inter-state traffic. Many a poor woman and 
her children had Christmas presents besides free- 
dom from the fear of a drunken husband and fath- 
er, because there were no open saloons in North 
Carolina. 

• * * * 

A short trip through the country at this season 
in counties where there has been no road improve- 
ment accentuates the desperate situation of a 
country dependent largely upon wagon traffic. Yet 
it is strange that such sections encounter the most 
pronounced opposition to any movement for road 
improvement. The economic loss to the country 
on account of bad roads is appalling when express- 
ed in figures. In many sections the schools have 
scant attendance and the church services are of 
little value because of the condition of the roads. 
Besides this many things of good value go to 
waste because those who produce them cannot af- 
ford to haul them to market over such roads. It 
would greatly promote the cause of religion and 
morals as well as that of education if the peo- 
ple would provide themselves good public high- 
ways over which they could travel with ease at 
all seasons and in all sorts of weather. 



Speaking of good roads, one very important phase 
of the whole question, so far as it relates to the 
matter of public economy, seems to be overlooked 
by those who oppose their construction. The money 
raised from taxation makes a fund for the employ- 
ment of hundreds of the idle and also to pay for 
the stone which lies in the field as a hindrance 
to the farmer in his work. Practically all the 
money raised for road building is spent at home, 
so that we get not only the benefit of good roads 
for traffic, and enhanced value of all real estate, 
but we put the money back into the pockets of the 
people from whom we got it by taxation. There 
is nothing in which the country can engage that 
will come so near financing itself as road building. 



Referring to the fact that there were three local 
tragedies in the town of Montgomery, Ala., in 
one week, the editor of the Charlotte Observer 
quotes Dr. Edmunds, pastor of the First Presbyter- 
ian Church of that city, as approving the courage 
and fairmindedness of the newspapers of that 
community in printing the facts about these cases. 
Dr. Edmunds took occasion to say that "a thou- 
sand years ago, the world appeared to be better 
morally, because there were no telegraph wires or 
fast trains and no newspapers adequately equipp- 
ed to mirror in each publication the life of the 
world. In those far distant ages, the wicked acts 
and the sordid things of life went unminded. In 
his opinion a marked change in the world for good 
is the certain knowledge among those who are 
lawlessly inclined that their evil deeds of the night 
will be printed in the newspapers of the next morn- 



ing; their names brought in bold relief before the 
public and their evil indulgences submitted to the 
calm judgment of the people who read and think 
and plan for the betterment of the human race." 

"We have tried for a number of years to indulge 
the hope that Dr. Edmunds' view of the moral con- 
dition of the age is correct. But amid the oft-re- 
peated tragedies of the present day we fear that 
so far as America is concerned, there has been 
retrogression. Statistics as to the number of homi- 
cides, for instance, make a bad show for American 
morals. Publicity may be a deterrant force. It 
is an open question as to just what the moral effect 
of publicity is. There is hardly room for doubt, 
however, that the sensational reports ordinarily 
made up for the daily papers, giving in detail the 
methods of criminals, making a thrilling story of 
the case from beginning to end, are very hurtful, 
especially to the young. There is such a thing as 
making heros and heroines of the basest criminals 
by the manner in which we tell the story of their 
wickedness. The average boy in the teens is al- 
ways intensely interested in learning just how a 
crime was plotted and carried out. Publicity may 
be all right, but the reading of the story of crime 
is not edifying. A good Scripture reference here 
is Phil. 4:8. 

* * * * 

At this time it seems evident that the Chinese 
Empire is tottering to its fall. We have no doubt 
that the result of it will be a stronger and better 
nation. While the old order of things has not 
been without its benefits, yet it was developed un- 
der a system of religious teaching which appealed 
to superstition rather than to reasonable faith 
and made its subjects abject slaves rather than men 
of freedom. The coming into contact with the 
more advanced civilization of the world has stirr- 
ed the millions into life and injected the spirit of 
hope. The unrest of the present day in China is 
really the highest tribute to the effectiveness of 
Christianity as presented by the missionaries who 
have labored faithfully for more than a century. 
There may be a time of great suffering to many 
in the ordeal of change, but all these things are but 
the growing pains of a nation into what has been 
injected the spirit of a new life. It looks now as 
if the old Manchu Dynasty will abdicate and that 
the star of a new republic will rise in the Far 
East. Our people in the homeland should pray 
earnestly for the lives and the continued success 
of our missionaries, also that God may direct in 
tke establishment of a government that will has- 
ten the coming of His kingdom. 



Cable dispatches from Shanghai on Friday an- 
nounced the birth of the new republic of China by 
the election of Dr. Sun Yat Sen as president. Dr. 
Sen is the one who planned the revolution, and is 
now chosen president by the provisional military 
assembly. It is believed that this even foreshadows 
the absolute collapse of a monarchy. 



The church in North Carolina has suffered what 
seems an almost irreparable loss in the death of 
Rev. Dr. P. R. Law, editor of the Presbyterian 
Standard. We say the church, for while Dr. Law 
was a Presbyterian minister, such men are not 
to be considered as an asset of a single denomina- 
tion. He was a man of learning and an orthodox 
preacher- — a true defender of the faith, and, withal, 
a man of extraordinary natural endowments. He 
had the genuine editorial instinct which made him 
capable always of writing with discriminating 
judgment on the living questions of the day. The 
editorial page of the Presbyterian Standard has 
always, during his term of service, been sprightly 
and attractive. He knew how to interpret public 
opinion and was himself a moulder of public opin- 



ion. His death is a distinct loss to the church of 
Christ in North Carolina as well as the whole 
south which he touched more or less in his great 
work. 

* * » » 

There is evidently some ground for fear that 
England and Germany may at almost any time 
become involved in war. It is claimed by leaders 
in Germany that England looks with suspicion on 
every move that is made and is constantly getting 
in Germany's way. Such a war would be fearful 
to contemplate and might set the whole world 
ablaze. Why should we delay the adoption of the 
proposed arbitration treaty? By every token it. 
should be adopted at once. 

» * * * 

The peril of wealth is no longer a remote condi- 
tion in this country, as related either to the indi- 
vidual or the state. The possession of a million 
or more is a commonplace circumstance, and the 
social history of our time is reeking with the filth 
and indecency of an element suddenly thrown from 
the lower to the upper strata of society — the new 
rich, who know no use that can be made of wealth 
but that of catering to the demands of sensuality. 
Dr. Gross Alexander in his admirable address de- 
livered at the recent Ecumenical Conference, says 
truly, "When wealth gets possession of a man's 
heart it puts out the inner light, as Jesus says, 
and chloroforms his capacity of spiritual discern- 
ment." This being true, how can it be that the 
millionaire, with the vast power that great wealtu 
always confers, bereft of all the nobler impulses 
of the higher nature, can be less a peril to the 
body politic than the thousands of hapless ad- 
venturers who tramp from place to place and feel 
no interest in stable government or settled society? 
The fact is, we need to adopt the prayer of Agur, 
"Give me neither poverty nor riches." The rich 
growing richer is the necessary concomitant of the 
poor growing poorer. So far as the development 
of high moral character and patriotic citizenship 
is concerned the former are quite as unfortunate 
as the latter. 

* * * * 

Under the caption, "Building Altar Against Al- 
tar," Dr. Spencer, editor of the Central Christian 
Advocate, Kansas City, says: 

"It really is ridiculous that in a little new town 
way up in Montana there should be a Methodist 
Episcopal church, and just across the road a Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, when either one of 
the churches could hold about all the people there 
are in the town. But the other denominations have 
raced in also. They occupy the other corners. And 
really are not some of those churches mere para- 
sites? 

"A writer on religious conditions claims that this 
is one of the causes why the religious life is de- 
clining. Men of common sense are outraged by a 
denominational pride and jealousy and proselytisro 
which certainly can not be of the Nazarene. Hence 
they absent themselves. And the world wags on — 
waiting for the good time when men will put the 
Christianity of Christ before denominational shib- 
boleths." 

We heartily agree with Dr. Spencer, but must 
insist that the spectacle here described is just as 
disgusting in a Southern community as in the 
great Northwest. As to the opinion of the "writer 
on religious conditions," in order to see how little 
there is in his contention one has only to recall 
that such conditions exist in any really hurtful 
way in comparatively small and remote communi- 
ties. While we would rejoice to see a thorough 
plan of federating, if not union, of the Methodist 
bodies in America, we do not take stock in the 
contention that the cause of Christ is injured to 
any great extent by separate denominations even 
of those called Methodists. 



Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 4, 1912 



THE NEW YEAR 

"We spend our years as a tale that is told." So 
says the Psalmist of Israel in his meditation on 
life and death. The years seem to flit by us more 
and more rapidly as they multiply. Time acceler- 
ates the movement of the years and brings us, ere 
we are aware, to the border-land of the unseen. 
Well may we adopt the prayer of the Psalmist as 
we face the new year, "so teach us to number our 
days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom." 

There is nothing worth living for but the appli- 
cation of our energies to the God-given tasks which 
promise good to ourselves and good to our fellow- 
men. So in all our plans we may well pray for the 
wisdom to chose the unselfish course which will be 
sure to bring satisfaction to us and joy to others. 
It is perfectly natural to map out what we con- 
ceive to be a new and better programme for the 
new year. Let us not condemn the habit of set- 
ting new resolutions. This is the only hope of 
reform. He who never resolves to do better is 
not likely to amend in any particular. But let us be 
sure that our new resolutions look not to the grati- 
fying of some selfish desire or vain or ambitious 
purpose, but to the making of our lives helpful to 
others. 

As we know not what a day may bring forth, 
neither can we tell whether this year is to mark 
the close of our earthly pilgrimage. Of all the 
obituaries that might be written for us, we ought 
to covet that of the worthy Patriarch of whom it is 
written. "He served his generation faithfully by 
the will of God." What greater thing can be achiev- 
ed in life than to live so that it may be said that 
we served faithfully the generation in which we 
lived? 

With great propriety we may join in the "watch 
night" song of the fathers: 

"Come, let us anew our journey pursue, 

Roll round with the year, 

And never stand .still till the Master appear. 

His adorable will let us gladly fulfill 

And our talents improve 

By the patience of hope and the labor of love." 

* * * * 

THE GREENSBORO Y. M. C. A. 

We hail with pleasure the long-looked-for day 
when Greensboro would have an adequately equip- 
ped Y. M. C. A. This institution was thrown open 
to the young men of the city just before the holi- 
days and starts with a membership of more than 
three hundred. 

There is no doubt that the Y. M. C. A. is a great 
factor among the forces that work for the conser- 
vation of the moral and religious influences of the 
community, and we hope to see the Greensboro in- 
stitution take a leading place in the work for 
young men in the state. 

While referring to this we desire also to express 
the hope that, at no distant day, our city may move 
for an even greater equipment for the Y. W. C. A. 
We .have long felt that if possible, there is even 
greater need that the Young Women should be 
amply provided with a place for lodging and gath- 
ering under the watch-care of the best religious 
influences. A city the size of Greensboro does not 
do its duty by a large element of its best young 
life without an adequately equipped Y. W. C. A. 

* * * * 
SINGING IN THE CONGREGATION 

Brother Clark, of the Statesville Landmark, 
quoting from the Advocate of December 21 in refer- 
ence to the congregation ceasing to sing, as usual, 
says what ought to be said in his comment as fol- 
lows: 

"The same complaint will lie against all the city 
and town churches. Singing is as much a part of 
worship as preaching and prayer, but under mod- 
ern conditions that part of the worship is confined 
to the choir — at least in the more fashionable 
churches, where they have paid singers and musi- 
cians. Some of the choir music is very fine and 
sometimes the average worshiper can enjoy it; but 
an ear for music and a voice for singing can sing 
with the modern choirs, for they give even the 
most familiar hymns a tune that is unfamiliar. 
Congregational singing is at an end in the urban 
churches and will probably never be revived. It's 
a pity, too, for there is no part of church worship 
more uplifting and inspiring, than congregational 



singing, where practically all the congregation Joins 

in heartily and earnestly. We have often thought 
that the pastors and people who manage the 
churches should hire a singing teacher to give a 
series of lessons at least once a year to the con- 
gregation and urge all the members — especially the 
young people — to attend and learn to sing — not the 
complicated modern music, but the simple tunes 
that are easily learned, so that those who do not 
read music can join in. If this plan was adopted 
and the work of the choir modified so that it would 
not ring in too many solos and anthems and things 
that few understand or enjoy, which are all right 
on occasion but as a regular thing are a trifle tire- 
some — if this was done, we say, congregational 
singing could be revived. This plan will hardly 
take in the town and city churches, but it should 
be adopted in the rural districts. The Advocate 
says under modern conditions few people own a 
hymn book, the church supplying them to the pews. 
This is one reason why so few are familiar with 
the hymns or try to sing. In the homes of the 
older church people the hymn-book was as con- 
spicuous as the Bible. Literature was not so plen- 
tiful then and the children memorized the hymns 
and learned to sing. Now they never see a hymn- 
book except in church and unless they have studied 
music they do not attempt to sing; and not all of 
those who understand music will sing unless they 
are put in the choir and given an opportunity to 
perform before the whole congregation." 

Some time ago the Treasurer of the Board of 
Stewards in one of our prominent churches read 
the financial report for the year showing, item by 
item, just what had been expended. One item of 
the budget was about $700.00 which had been ex- 
pended for the maintenance of the choir. We have 
not the slightest doubt that two-thirds of those 
who had contributed to the support of the choir 
would have been glad to have contributed liberally 
to a hush fund, rather than to have endured the un- 
earthly warbling of some of the highest priced 
singers. The Advocate has contended all along 
that there is really no popular demand for modern 
opera singers in the church nor for the so-called 
scientific music which they have brought with them 
into the sanctuary. That such a state of things 
exists in many of our churches is a mere sufferance 
on the part of a multitude of people who dislike 
to complain or take chances of creating a disturb- 
ance. 

We need the choir for leading the congregation, 
but the choir should be willing to sing without 
compensation, unless it be in the case of the or- 
ganist and leader, and the choir should sing the 
gospel in perfect harmony with the pastor who 
preaches the gospel. We doubt if any better plan 
could be adopted than the employment of an organ- 
ist and leader, who, as the editor of the Landmark 
suggests, might train the whole congregation to 
sing. We can see no other method which offers a 
solution of the trouble. The fact is, this is one 
of the most important questions confronting the 
pastor and congregation and pastors everywhere 
should be sustained in an effort to place the music 
entirely under his direction. 

* * * * 
R. F. D. MEN OUT OF POLITICS 

President Taft has caused the Postoffice Depart- 
ment to issue an order removing R. F. D. mail 
carriers from the field of political activity. By 
this order the rural carriers are put in the class 
with city carriers and under the civil service. All 
appointments will be made after examinations. The 
order, it is estimated, will affect 10,000 men. It 
goes into effect at once, and mail carriers who do 
not observe it will be considered guilty of "perni- 
cious activity." 

» * » • 

MASONS TO MEET 

The North Carolina Grand Lodge of Masons will 
meet in annual session in Raleigh Saturday. Grand 
Secretary Drewry reports that there has been a 
gain of about one thousand in the membership of 
the order in the State during the past year and 
that the resources have materially increased, the 
total resources being $19,101. There are 140 sub- 
ordinate lodges, with a membership of 22,000. There 
will be about 700 delegates to the grand lodge. Two 
past grand masters have died during the year — Dr. 
F. M. Mayo and C. C. Clark of Newbern; also Grand 
Lecturer Charles F. Bahnson and. Deputy Grand 
Master Thomas S. Kenan, Raleigh. 



HENRY WATERSON ON PEACE 

That the notion that war makes for manly de- 
velopment is at variance with all history, was large- 
ly the burden of an address delivered in Charlotte 
Saturday night by Colonel Henry Watterson, the 
distinguished editor of the Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal, who advocated the ratification of the pending 
peace treaties between the United States, England 
and France. Colonel Watterson spoke to a large 
audience and was heartily applauded throughout 
his address. At the conclusion of Mr. Watterson's 
speech, Major J. C. Hemphill, editor of the Char- 
lotte Observer, offered a set of resolutions, which 
were unanimously adopted, endorsing the ratifi- 
cation of the peace treaties. Colonel Watterson was 
presented to the audience in a graceful speech by 
Mr. Charles W. Tillett, a leading member of the 
Charlotte bar and one of our best Methodist lay- 
men. 

* * » * 

VIOLATING STATE PROHIBITION LAW 

Ever since the people of North Carolina, by an 
overwhelming majority, voted out the saloon the 
prohibition law of the State has been persistently 
violated by representatives of wholesale liquor 
houses and distilleries in other states who have 
visited our cities and towns at intervals and quiet- 
ly solicited orders. Of course these men and their 
employers know they are violating a law of North 
'Carolina — in fact, they are better informed on 
this point than many well-meaning prohibitionists. 
In a few instances these liquor drummers have been 
arrested for soliciting orders, but if any one has 
been sent to jail or to the roads we do not recall it 
at the present moment. Recently the Raleigh News 
and Observer received an inquiry from a subscriber 
as to the legal status of these liquor drummers, 
and not desiring to assume the responsibility of 
a legal opinion, the letter was referred to the At- 
torney-General of North Carolina. His reply fol- 
lows, and it would appear to be conclusive: 

"I 'have your favor of the 14th enclosing letter 
from a certain party in North Carolina, who asks 
the following question: 

"Have the whiskey houses in Virginia the legal 
right to send their salesmen to this, a prohibition 
State, to solicit and take orders for whiskey and 
beer ?' 

"You wish advice from this office as to whether 
or not there is a law in this State covering this 
question. 

"In reply I wish to say that the Legislature in 
the Special Session of 1908, by Chapter 118, of the 
Public Acts of said session, passed the following 
statute: 

"It shall be unlawful for any person, for himself 
or as an agent or traveling salesman for any person 
firm or corporation to solicit orders or proposals of 
purchase by the jug or bottle or otherwise of intoxi- 
cating liquors within the borders of any or all 
counties, townships, precincts towns and cities in 
the State of North Carolina wherein prohibition 
prevails or the sale of intoxicating liquors is prohib- 
ited by law: Provided that this section shall not 
be construed to prohibit the law: Provided, that 
liquors in not less than five gallon packages to all 
parties or persons who are duly authorized by law 
to sell intoxicating liquors. Any person violating 
any of the provisions of this section shall be guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be 
fined or imprisoned or both, in the discretion of the 
court' 

"This I think thoroughly disposes of the matter. 
Since the act makes the one who violates its pro- 
visions guilty of a misdemeanor, of course the 
proper procedure to follow in order to put a stop 
to business of the kind, would be to have a war- 
rant issued and the party brought to trial." 

* * * * 

GROWTH OF THE POSTAL SERVICE 

The annual report of the United States Postoffice 
Department, which was made public this week, 
contains much information of interest to the public. 
At the close of the last fiscal. year there were in 
operation 59,237 postoffices of all classes in the 
United States. The postal city delivery service is 
now in operation in 1,541 cities, serving more than 
46,000,000 people; and on the 42,000 rural routes 
people receive mail. This leaves a considerable 
portion of the American people, most of whom re- 



January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



side in towns and cities, the report declares, with- 
out any form of free delivery service; and under 
the present laws there is no way by which the de- 
partment can relieve the inequality. The cost of 
free delivery in cities, including collection expenses, 
was nearly $33,000,000, or more than 18 per cent of 
the gross revenue of the city delivery cities. The 
gross revenues for the year amounted to $237,879,- 
824; the xpenditures to $237,648,927, leaving a sur- 
plus of $219,118, after deducting $11,779 on account 
of loss of postal funds by fire and burglary. The 
amount of Sunday work has been reduced fully 50 
per cent. About 20,000 clerks and 15,000 carriers 
who formerly reported for duty every Sunday are 
now given a day of rest. 

* * * * 

OVER-PRODUCTION OF COAL 

Edward W. Parker, the coal statistician for the 
United States Geological Survey, reports that there 
was an overproduction of coal in this country in 
1911, resulting in a consequent struggle for trade 
that depressed prices. He considers the past year 
one of the most unsatisfactory in the history of 
the coal-mining industry and believes that, when 
the returns for the year are footed up, the balance 
will probably be found on the wrong side of the 
ledger. "The anthracite industry in 1911" he said, 
"probably was as firm as any other in the country. 
A part of the increase in production was due to 
the stocking of fuel in anticipation of April 1, 1912, 
when the wage agreements terminate. The bitumi- 
nous trade, on the whole, has been demoralized and 
discouraging; and much of the business was con- 
ducted at a loss. The principal cause to this, par- 
ticularly in the Eastern States, has been the de- 
pression in the iron trade. The total production of 
coal for the year is estimated at $490,000,000 tons, 
only 11,000,000 less than in 1910. Of this year's 
production 400,000,000 tons was bituminous coal." 

* * * * 

TO CLOSE PEABODY EDUCATION FUND 

The Peabody Education Fund, of which the Hon. 
Joseph H. Choate is chairman, has announced anoth- 
er great gift, to be finally $3,300,000, to further pub- 
lic education in the Southern States. In this con- 
nection the trustees also announce that they have 
voted to close the trust and distribute the funds re- 
maining in their hands. 

The Peabody Normal College, at Nashville, Tenn., 
which lias been maintained by this fund for the 
past 36 years as a leading and central normal 
school for the South, is to be converted into the 
George Peabody College for Teachers, "an institu- 
tion designed to be the final memorial of Mr. Pea- 
body's beneficent service to the South and our com- 
mon country and to serve as the educational crown 
of the system of schools which the Southern States 
have' established and are maintaining." It will 
be for the higher education of teachers of all the 
South. In announcing the plans of this institution, 
the trustees say: | ^ 

"The trustees of the Peabody Educatdional Fund 
have given to the George Peabody College for 
Teachers at Nashville the sum of $1,000,000 con- 
current with gifts of money by the- State of Ten- 
nessee, the County of Davidson and the city of 
Nashville, amounting to $550,000, and sixteen acres 
of land with buildings and appurtenances by the 
University of Nashville, which do not exceed in 
value $250,0000. 

"These appropriations have been already paid over 
to the George Peabody College for Teachers. Now, 
in the course of final dissolution, the Peabody Foun- 
dation Fund has offered to endow the College for 
Teachers with the additional sum of $500,000, pro- 
vided that within two years from Nov. 1, 1911, the 
college raise the further sum of $1,000,000. 

"These are all the funds at the disposal of the 
trustees of the Peabody Education Fund for such 
a purpose under Mr. Peabody's deed of gift; with 
due regard to the claims of other objects of his 
bounty named by him. If the additional $1,000,000 
contemplated by the trustees in this last gift can 
be raised it will establish the college on an adequate 
financial basis, but with less than this it cannot be 
done. 

"Under these circumstances the trustees of the 
Peabody Education Fund have instructed us as of- 
ficers of the board to appeal in the name of the 
trustees and on behalf of the George Peabody Col 
lege for Teachers to the friends of education 
throughout the United States to aid by every means 



in their power to raise the additional $1,000,000 
required. The alumni of the college have already 
pledged themselves to raise $200,000 of the amount 
needed. We firmly believe that no man of means 
can put money to a nobler of more beneficent use 
than by helping the College of Teachers to raise this 
much needed sum. 

"Communications should be addressed to James 
C. Bradford, Chairman Executive Committee, Geo. 
Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn." 



OBSERVATIONS 

What would we do without Christmas and what 
would we be, if that first Christmas Gift had not 
been presented in the Bethlehem manger 1911 years 
ago? 

For Jesus was the richest gift that ever came 
to earth, bringing light, life, grace, peace, salva- 
tion, blessings untold, to every child of man and 
for these we owe to Him a wealth of gratitude and 
service which we never can repay, but must simply 
accept as free gifts. 

We should celebrate the Christmas festival with 
praise and worship most devout and bring rich 
gifts to Him by giving freely to the poor. 

Christmas has been the season of gladness all 
over this old world ever since Jesus first came 
to earth. It is the glad time to which childhood 
looks and which fills old age with the spirit of 
youth. It is the season of good cheer and re-un- 
ion. The children who have wandered far into 
other lands, then stop and think of the old home 
roof which sheltered their childhood and of the 
aged parents who still linger there, or perchance 
of the sainted ones long since gone, but who be- 
fore their departure had made that sacred spot a 
place of security and love. 

Many journeyed long distances to see parents 
and mingle again with the friends of youth. The 
old father and mother had been looking so long 
and so patiently for that day to come and for that 
child to return and what joy and blessing such 
sweet re-unions bring to the young and strong as 
well as to declining age. 

* * * * 

But while so many thus rejoice there are so 
many others who have met with great sorrows and 
bitter struggles, so that grief and desolation have 
driven joy from their lives. The contrast is so 
great that it makes the disappointment more se- 
vere. 

On Christmas day when all the world seemed 
glad, a messenger came to my door and said a 
child had died and I was wanted to conduct the 
funeral. I went through cold and slush to perform 
this sad office and saw the young mother lean upon 
the breast of her husband and they together wept 
convulsively while the dear little child was lower- 
ed to the grave and buried out of their sight and 
I thought what a dreary Christmas it was to them. 
There was rejoicing in all the world but their 
hearts were bleeding and they were so lonely and 
sad when they went back to their home and found 
in it no Christmas joy. But I was thankful that 
I could comfort them with the precious assurance 
that while the child could not come back, they 
could go to the child. (II. Samuel 12:23) (I. Peter 
1:3-9.) I thought too of the many homes scatter- 
ed over the land in which a year ago there was 
an unbroken and happy circle, but now at this 
Christmas there are vacant chairs and the absent 
faces will no more be seen on earth. So it is, has 
always been and ever will be, as long as this old 
world stands. 

* * * * 

At Conference a few weeks ago our sainted broth- 
er the late Rev. W. P. McGhee, seemed vigorous 
and strong, in the very height of his usefulness 
as a minister of Christ. Hopefully he entered up- 
on a new year of service at Calvary church in 
Charlotte. Within two weeks, before he had hard- 
ly started in his work, the paper announced that 
he had been taken to the hospital for treatment 
and that his condition was critical — hopeless., and 
on December 20, the disease overcame him and he 
died. What a sad and dreary Christmas it was to 
this grief-stricken wife and the children and my 
sympathy goes out to them now again as I write 
these lines. 

It was gratifying that Brother McGhee was a 
member of our Conference Brotherhood and that 
we will have the privilege of contributing to that 



sacred fund for the benefit of this good woman 
and her little children. 

Now just here, a word about the Brotherhood. 
It is not in a business sense an insurance company. 
We do not ask the preacher who may apply for 
membership how old he is or how strong he is. 
Any preacher of the Conference, on trial or super- 
annuated is welcome as a member without medl 
cal examination upon payment of the fifty cents 
initiation fee and $3.00 to meet the next assess- 
ment on account of a death. Now we have 30 
preachers on trial and 244 full members of the 
Conference making 274 preachers who are eligible 
to membership in the Brotherhood. If all these 
preachers were members they would be able to 
raise $722.00 to meet a death claim and then if 
every preacher would labor to secure three lay- 
men as honorary members who would pay $1.00 
each upon the death of a preacher the widow would 
secure nearly $1500.00 or to be accurate, $1444.00 
at a time when it would meet urgent necessities. 
But of these 274 preachers, only 116 are members 
of the Brotherhood and we have only seven lay- 
men who are honorary members and one of these 
is the generous-hearted philanthropist, Gen. Julian 
S. Carr, of Durham, who when he gave his name 
pledged $5.00 on every death. Now if every mem- 
ber pays his dues we will be able to raise for the 
benefit of Mrs. McGhee $359.00. Oh that every 
member of the Conference and every preacher on 
trial when he reads this would send in his name 
for membership to Rev. C. M. Pickens, Secretary 
and Treasurer, Lenoir, N. C, and then let every 
brother secure at least three honorary members 
and send in their names. There is no charity 
more worthy and it seems that every man should 
seize the opportunity of getting in and having a 
part in all the good it is planned to do, and then 
as a secondary claim, your own family may some 
day need the fund to supply bodily comfort after 
you are dead. 

Dr. Weaver, the President of the Brotherhood, 
will very soon appoint one preacher in each Dis- 
trict to solicit clerical and lay members. Let all 
the preachers and many laymen respond when the 
call is made. 

W. L. S. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We make it a rule to send monthly statements 
to all who owe us accounts, and our customers 
must not take offense. No other rule is safe in 
business. We have just mailed statements for 
January 1st. Many of these are for amounts car- 
ried over from last year which should have been 
settled at Conference. We settle our own accounts 
monthly and we must insist that our customers 
follow the same rule. We have no large operating 
fund which would justify us in offering long indul- 
gence. 



NOTICE 

The Minutes are being shipped this week, 
charges prepaid, and I have by mail notified the 
brethren of this fact. In order to save expense 
the packages for one community are sent to one 
address to be distributed. In a few instances this 
may be slightly inconvenient but I trust all the 
brethren will remember that it had to be done be- 
cause the funds were limited. If packages have 
not reached the destination by January 8 at latest 
please notify me and I will have the delayed pack- 
age traced. ;( 

I had hoped certainly to be able to deliver all 
the Journals by Dec. 20 but unforseen and un- 
avoidable delays hindered the work. 

W. L. Sherrill, Sec. 

Pineville, N. C, Jan. 1, '12. 



REV. B. MARGESON TO HIGH POINT 

Last week Dr. Marr announced through the Ad- 
vocate that Rev. B. Margeson was available for re- 
vival work. Since that time he has been appointed 
to South Main Street Church, High Point, as pastor 
to fill the vacancy caused by the going away of 
Rev. G. E. Eaves. It will, therefore, not be practic- 
able for Bro. Margeson to undertake the work 
as helper in revival meetings. 

We are glad to know that Brother Margeson goes 
to South Main Street, and congratulate the con- 
gregation on their good fortune in securing him. 



Page Four 



January 4, 1912 



SECULARIZING RELIGION 

C. W. Hunt 

The time was when the simple preaching of the 
word had more effect than in modern times. Then 
people were more simple in life. The temptations 
and evil teachings of modern times were unknown. 
Man Seeking a change in life found the earlier 
preacher a power for showing the way to eternal 
life. To say that God's power had waned would 
be to deny it all. Then man took the Word at the 
word of man — he knew little of doubts. Now with 
the more strenuous life, with good training and 
bad training there is wholly a different set to reach 
with the gospel, and any sensible, reasonable and 
right supplement to the gospel must be blessed of 
Him in the minister's work. 

* • * * 

Recently I have heard two sermons from the 
same man along this line. They were inspiring, 
and if I say anything here that will help any one 
to do more that minister will have the credit of 
it. The danger of secularizing religion must be 
met and settled. Men preaching the word will 
need to know how much of what is called secular can 
be put with the simple preaching from the pulpit. 
Will God refuse anything that ihelps His servant 

to do good anywhere at any time? 

* * * * 

Coming from a layman, who has never "hurt" 
himself doing good, the average minister may re- 
sent any suggestion, coming as this does from the 
pew, but suppose for the coming year that more 
practical work and less fine-spun theories be preach- 
ed? Instead of what constitutes baptism or regen- 
eration let more time be put in on the outside find- 
ing people who need help. The world is full of 
them and they do not go to church; hence no ser- 
mon from the pulpit Sunday morning can reach 
those who may need you worst of all. Preach with 
all your power, but work next week and get men 
and women to help you. Tell the pew its duty, man 
to man. 

* * * * 

There may be the widow with children, puzzled 
to know how best to make a living. There may be 
the orphan boy or girl touching the age that means 
manhood and womanhood for good or for evil. If 
you can touch either of these and make life to them 
what God intended all lives to be, in some degree, 
if you can find work for the idle and ihelp those 
you meet in need to get on a higher plane and make 
a citizen worthy of the name instead of a criminal 
or an idler, the joy that will come to you, and the 
happiness you make will make it blessed and a 
blessing. Where are they? All around you. No 
community is without those needing help. 

* * * * 

That youth, the son o fwell-to-do parents or of 
parents at least able to take care of him, may be 
going to the bad. He will shun you because he 
has been bad, and what he has absorbed makes him 
want none of yours; but would it not be time truly 
well spent to seek the boy and from a purely busi- 
ness, man to man standpoint get his confidence and 
get him in the right way to make a man? If you 
reach him in this way the reaching of him in the 
other way will be easy. Your going to church and 
home again; the visiting of families in a perfunc- 
tory way; the calling at some business office and 
passing the time are harmless, entirely so, but the 
good you do that way will count little in this life 
and you will leave none to call you blessed when 
called hence. 

* * * * 

That beggar that plies his trade from day to day 
upon the streets may be a beggar from environment 
rather than from necessity. As he is he is a barnacle 
to the community. Put to work he will be a citi- 
zen. Simply helping the beggar, giving alms leaves 
him a beggar still; but to make him earn his own 
way may save a soul as well. Thousands of men 
and women beg from choice or because that is all 
they know. To change one to a producer would be 
a blessing even if the strong arm of the law has to 
be invoked. They may have to be helped for a time, 
and you have no funds, but there are those who have 
and if you, occupying the place you do, can show 
such that good comes from this; good that will 
count in the future, the money for such will be 
forth coming. 

* * * * 

That cripple from the lower strata of society is 
helpless, a non-producer, solely for the reason that 
lie does not know how to work. God has given you 
the mind; you have the knowledge that this boy 



or girl needs to help them earn their own way. 
By getting to the inside of the case you can, with 
your influence, find something or somebody who will 
allow them to earn something. There are those 
begging from door to door that are much more able 
to make a living, physically, than many well to 
do people who started right. To start such an one 
on the road, and see the change will bring you more 
of true happiness than preaching any number of 
sermons on predestination or heavenly recognition. 
Such is work. There is no pious idleness in it. 

* * • » 

Then the man past or coming to middle life 
who has lost his hold on life; whose gray hairs pre- 
vent getting work; whose chances in early life were 
uot the best, and who by sickness, perhaps for the 
w.tfit of knowledge, is idle with dependents needing 
his help. Your superior mind may be able to take 
in his case and find some way for him to earn his 
living on his own account independent of any em- 
ployer who has tabooed all men forty or past. Help- 
ing such is helping a family, and you touch souls. 
Do you think for a moment that a hungry and ill- 
clothed man will listen to you when you offer him 
salvation through Jesus? Nay, verily. Physical 
needs supplied he may talk to you. Then think 
of the grateful hearts that will follow in your wake, 
if you put the practical work to the test? 

* * * * 

You know, and I know, and the world knows that 
the simple going to church on Sundays, the preach- 
ing of a perfunctory sermon, admonishing good is 
the rule; and we all three know that such does not 
reach those in need, for they are not there: and 
unless you follow the sermon with work on the 
outside you are doing little else than drawing a 
salary you have done little to earn. You know that 
as well as I do; and you know, too, that just such 
as that makes you feel at times like quitting and 
going to other work. And there is no wonder. The 
wonder is that so many have gone on from year to 
year? "My word is sufficient for you" is not enough 
to reach present day people. Try it this year. Get 
the helpless to helping themselves. Get employ- 
ment for the idle. Help the weaker with your 
superior knowledge. Find the orphan a home. Then 
come up at the end of the year and tell how you 
feel. 



LETTER FROM TEXAS 

For many, many months I have thought I would 
write a few lines for the Advocate, but much weak- 
ness and many small duties just at hand have pre- 
vented me. But while I have been a silent reader 
I have not been an indifferent one. It is hardly 
probable that the Advocate is more closely read in 
any home than in this one here in the mountains 
of Texas. We all read it, that can read, and prac- 
tically read it all. Your editorials — "On the Wing," 
and "Observations" by Bro. Sherrill, reports from 
the orphanage work, Trinity College Items, the 
progress of the G. F. C, Davenport, Rutherford and 
Weaverville work, presiding elders' and pastors' 
movements, etc., etc., are all carefully watched. If 
I am able to hold up a paper I am always interested 
enough to try to keep up with all these things. 

The last session of our Annual Conference, view- 
ed from this distance, looked good indeed. The 
thing about it that did me most good was the re- 
ports of so many fine revivals and such a large in- 
crease in membership. Methodism is a very live 
force in most of our Conferences and I shall be 
surprised if the revival does not become much more 
general during the present year. We have a great 
gospel to preach and when our preachers preach 
it and do their pastoral work results are sure to 
follow. 

Another thing in the Conference that pleased 
me much was the small percentage of changes 
among the preachers. In my judgment the worst 
thing about our itinerant system is that it is often 
used too freely. Many unnecessary moves are some- 
times made, and many changes are made necessary 
by the fact that our preachers and people know 
it is so easy to get a change. But at our last ses- 
sion the changes were comparatively few and seem 
to have been very well considered and in the main 
very wise. For years I have favored the removal 
of the time limit entirely, and making changes 
only where they are a necessity. 

Texas has a number of North Carolina preachers, 
most of them doing well here, as they doubtless 
would have done at home. One of these North 
Carolina boys, Rev. J. D. Drake, was our pastor 



here two years ago and is now at the growing 
town of Keatville doing a fine work. He doesn't 
rank as a great preacher, but he knows how to 
preach the great themes of the gospel so as to 
awaken sinners, comfort mourners, and feed the 
flock of God. He also understands the art of pas 
toral work. For these reasons he succeeds. Re- 
cently a brother minister drove up to Bro. Drake's 
on Sunday evening just before preaching time 
After the usual greetings Bro. Drake said, "I am 

so sorry you were not here this morning: Dr. 

one of the most noted orators in the church, deliv 
ered a great address here at 11 o'clock." "Well," 
said the visitor, "I have heard the Dr. and he it 
a great and good man. But really, Bro. Drake, 1 
would rather hear one of your poor sermons to 
night than to have heard the great Dr. this morn 
ing: for I am gospel hungry." I know the mar 
who said this and know that he was sincere. H( 
did not mean to reflect on the Dr. nor compliment 
Drake, he simply spoke the truth. There are man) 
other "Tar Heels" in the different Texas Gonferen 
ces, but I cannot name them all. Rev. L. D. Thomp 
son, of our Conference, was out here a while and 
had he stayed he would have been just as sure tc 
go to the front here as he is there. He soon be 
came a marked man and presiding elders and con 
gregations were watching him. 

The most popular Baptist preacher in Texas 
Rev. Geo. W. Trewit, of Dallas, is a North Carolina 
mountain boy, one of the "mountain Whites" it 
which you, Mr. Editor, and my good friends, Dr 
J. H. Weaver and Dr. Marr always take such £ 
deep interest. But it is probably in the newspapei 
business that North Carolina has made her great 
est contribution to Texas. A few years ago more 
than half the leading dailies of Texas were largelj 
owned or edited by former "Tar Heels," and J 
think it is about the same still. The Galvestor 
and Dallas News, two of the greatest papers in the 
state, were founded by a Mr. Belo, of Winston-Sa 
lem, N. C, and are still published by the Bek 
Publishing Co. The Houston Post, another great 
daily, is in the hands of Col. R. M. Johnson, whe 
came from Charlotte, N. C, and its most noted 
writer is a Mr. Bailey, of Statesville, N. C; and 
the leading editorial writer for the San Antonic 
Express for several years was a Mr. Sullivan from 
North Carolina. So you see Texas is not only a 
good place for the broken down of the East to make 
a last fight for life, but a good place for Nortk 
Carolina boys, who are afflicted with "wander lust' 
and cannot stay at home, to settle and go intc 
business or go on with their profession. 

In September last, when Rev. J. R. Moose was 
ready to start back to Korea he came down to San 
Antonio to put 'his daughter in the San Antonic 
Female College, and while there ran up and spent 
a night with us. He was in a great hurry and 
hence came and left us between suns. What a 
benediction his visit was! He is the same man 
but has grown a great deal since I saw him last 
Is there any work that rounds out Christian char 
acter like the Foreign Missionary work? If sc 
it is Home Mission work, much of which one may 
find in our richest congregations. Nearly two 
years ago Miss Mamie Bays, who was in San An- 
tonio reporting for Laymen's Movement, came ur, 
and spent two days with us. Her's was like an 
angel's visit, almost unheralded, and an unmixed 
joy to all of us. I was then just beginning tc 
rally from the lung hemorrhage I had two years 
ago and did not keep up with much of the conver- 
sation between ber and Mrs. Atkins and our chil- 
dren, but I have never had muoh idea how much 
they talked nor how little they slept. 

Mr. J. M. Washburn and family, of Shelby, N. C, 
have just settled at Center Point, a railroad town 
twenty miles from here. He started here but was 
unable to travel when he reached that place, and 
while he was stopping over a few days, the good 
people there caught him. I was out to see him 
a few days ago and found him well started in busi- 
ness, and he and his family hopeful. He is the 
kind of man and has the kind of family that this 
section needs, and by the way North Carolina 
needs them too. I am a long ways behind with 
many old friends who have written me. Please 
remember that muoh of the time I am not able to 
write at all, that ever letter is thoroughly enjoy- 
ed and that I still hope to write every one of them. 

With love to all North Carolina, especially the 
people among whom I have labored, and the breth- 
ren of the Conference, I am, 

Bandera, Texas. H. L. Atkins. 



January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



A REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE TO CON 
SIDER THE EVILS OF THE INTER-STATE 
LIQUOR TRAFFIC, HELD AT WASHING- 
TON, D. C, DEC. 14th AND 15th 

The Anti-Saloon League of America conceived 
the idea and outlined the plan of this Conference 
twelve months ago. The purpose was to bring to- 
gether prominent men of all vocations from all 
parts of the nation to discuss this question in 
Washington, D. C. and outline a bill that law- 
makers and citizens might agree upon to remedy 
the evils now growing out of the inter-state liquor 
traffic. The constituency represented on this oc- 
casion was the entire nation. Church and temper- 
ance organizations from more than forty states 
sent representatives, and twenty-eight of the gov- 
ernors officially appointed representatives for their 
states. In addition to the greatest temperance 
workers of the nation, there were present govern- 
ors, ex-governors, congressmen, senators, judges, 
labormen, bishops, doctors of divinity, educational 
and commericial men — in fact all classes were 
represented. 

The first meeting was a banquet, held Thursday 
night, Dec. 14, at the National Hotel, with six hun- 
dred in attendance; more than sixty of this num- 
ber being from the halls of Congress. On this oc- 
casion speeches were made by Congressman Webb 
from North Carolina, Congressman Sheppard from 
Texas, Ex-Senator Curtis from Kansas, Dr. P. A. 
Baker, General Superintendent of the Anti-Saloon 
League of America; Dr. Howard H. Russell, found- 
er of the Anti-Saloon League of America, Bishop 
Luther B. Wilson of the Methodist Episcopal 
church; Governor Mann of Virginia; Ex-Governor 
Manley of Indiana and Dr. H. C. Dinwiddle, Na- 
tional Legislative Superintendent of the Anti-Sa- 
loon League. The position taken by all these 
speakers is that Federal Government has no right 
to interfere with the enforcement of the prohibition 
laws by the various commonwealths of the nation, 
and that present inter-state commerce laws were, 
in effect, such as interfere. In the argument em- 
phasis was placed on the fact that the present law" 
controlling the traffic is not in harmony with the 
doctrine of the sovereignty of the State and that 
it was within the power of Congress to control 
this traffic as they saw fit. The impression made 
on all present was that the time had come for the 
temperance forces to demand legislation at the 
hands of Congress remedying this evil. This meet- 
ing adjourned at twelve o'clock to meet in Calvary 
Baptist church at nine-thirty Friday morning. 

At this meeting Governor Mann of Virginia pre- 
sided, and four secretaries representing national 
temperance organizations, were appointed. The> 
committee on business brought in a report pro- 
viding that the morning session should confine its 
discussion to the necessity of a law touching the 
inter-state liquor traffic, that the afternoon sess'.on 
should confine its discussion to the form of the 
bill that should be presented to Congress and that 
the last session should discuss the method by which 
Congress shall be induced to enact this Mil into 
law. 

Harmony and determination characterized this 
national gathering of temperance workers, citizens 
and law-makers. Not a doubting Thomas was 
present or a discordant note sounded. Governor 
Mann of Virginia; Judge Alexander of Mississippi; 
H. A. Spooner of Connecticut; Bishop Luther B. 
Wilson of Philadelphia; Gov. Noell of Mississippi; 
Dr. Barstow of Texas; Mr. E. D. Cameron of Ok- 
lahoma and Rev. R. L. Davis of North Carolina, 
spoke on the necessity of such legislation. Resolu- 
tions from mass meetings, churches and other 
gatherings were also presented. 

Discussing the form of bill to be presented was 
largely the work of the legal fraternity, and mei± 
of ability reviewed the various forms of bills and 
principles involved, that all possible light might 
be given to the Conference on this subject. Mr. 
Fred Caldwell, the Law Enforcement Attorney of 
the Oklahoma Anti-Saloon League, who is thorough- 
ly familiar with every phase of the inter-state 
liquor legislation and knows in detail every case 
of this nature that, has ever been before the Su- 
preme Court of the United States; Judge Alexan- 
der, State Attorney of Mississippi, who has been 
wrestling with this proposition for some time ana 
Ex-Governor Henley of Indiana, who is one of 
the first lawyers and citizens of his state, in their 
speeches gave much information to the Conference 
and answered scores of questions asked for in- 
formation by the workers in the meeting. 



Two forms of bills were discussed: one was the 
form of the Curtis-Sheppard Bill, which places all 
liquor under the police powers of the State to 
which it is destined as soon as it crosses the line 
of that state, and the other was the form of the 
Webb-McCumber Bill, which denies inter-state com- 
merce protection to any liquor shipped into any 
state to be received or used contrary to law. It 
is not to be supposed that in such a gathering all 
would agree. On this question the Supreme court 
of the nation has always disagreed, the law makers 
of the nation have differed and the temperance 
workers have their preferences as to bills. But I 
believe every man in the Conference waived his 
personal views and agreed to carry to success any 
bill that the committee of ten appointed should 
draft. The workers for national legislation rep- 
resenting the various temperance organizations 
and the congressmen and senators who havp in- 
troduced the bills referred to, were constituted a 
committee to draft a bill with authority to ar- 
range for the hearing before the committee and 
press for its passage. In their effort they will 
be backed up by all the temperance forces of this 
nation. 

During the discussion, Congressman Jackson of 
the Fourth District of Kansas gave the Convention 
his views on the proposition and assured them 
that in his opinion whatever bill was devised by 
this Conference would be passed by the present 
Congress. In other meetings and at other times 
we heard this same sentiment expressed by other 
members of Congress, and my conviction is, after 
spending a week in the Capitol City, conversing 
with many of our Congressmen and Senators, hear- 
ing them on the various occasions, seeing the wis- 
dom and mother wit of our temperance leaders and 
the harmony of the entire field force, that we will 
secure this legislation in the very near future. 

It is worthy of note that more than one speak- 
er emphasized the fact tha t legislation is not 
threshed out at the capitol but in the districts. As 
Congressman Webb of North Carolina so well put 
it, "When the people are right at home on this 
proposition, the legislation will be forth-coming." 
Therefore it is necessary for preachers and tem- 
perance leaders in every district of these United 
States to hold their mass meetings and send their 
resolutions to their Congressmen or pass around 
the petition, and after securing signatures, send 
to him, or better still, write strong letters indors- 
ing this movement or send telegraphic night let- 
ters hot and quick. The opinion of this writer is 
that the present congress is ready to do the will 
of the people and we need to let them know how 
we feel on this proposition and thus influence 
them. They do not need to be driven, and to bull- 
doze them is impossible. I visited both houses on 
several occasions and was most favorably impress- 
ed with the personnel and the spirit of our Na- 
tional law makers. R. L. Davis. 



GEORGIA LETTER 

Geo. G. Smith 
Your Cnoference has come and gone and so has 
ours. We were very crowded and a few fine young 
fellows were clamoring for admittance, when lo! 
eight transfers, each one expecting a better place 
than he had had before, were announced. They 
were to be provided for but they had to take "pot 
luck" and the pot had little in it. The church per- 
sists in making no change in the law of transferr- 
ing and many a man expecting to do better has 
sunk down in a strange Conference, who where he 
was well known could have been valued at his 
true worth. The North Georgia Conference is a 
very large one and has in it, cities of large size 
and a number of small cities or large towns and 
a much larger number of circuits and missions. 
A few places pay respectable salaries, the highest 
I think is $3000.00, a large number about $1000.00 
and a larger number less than a thousand. Trans- 
ferring to better one's condition is a hazardous 
thing. The large cities seem to be dissatisfied with 
home people, and in Atlanta the pastors of First 
Church and St. Pauls, and Wesley Memorial, are 
transferrs; in Augusta, St. Johns is filled by Dr. 
DuBose, a transfer. Other than these city ap- 
pointments the transfers have to take very ordi- 
nary circuits and have very scant pasturage, but 
Georgia has done so little transferring herself and 
if she were to call hom eher banished ones she 
would have a considerable vacancy in several West- 
ern Conferences. We bishops are very jealous of 
this transferring power and are loth to have it 



regulated but the want of regulation often involves 
them in great trouble. A bishop, say in Oklahoma, 
is asked to transfer a married man to N. Georgia. 
He knows the Conference is crowded but he takes 
the risk. The poor preacher with a wife and four 
children sells his furniture, his cow and horses 
and makes his long journey to Georgia. He knows 
nobody and nobody knows him. He has spent all 
his money and needs a shelter at once. The bishops 
alas find every church which pays a living salary 
already occupied and he cannot displace the in- 
cumbent, so he sends the man to the '"Possum Trot 
Mission" which has no parsonage and paid the 
local supply with the appropriation the year gone 
by, $300.00. All of this could have been avoided. 
If every man intending to transfer were to report 
to his bishop before the May meeting and slate his 
preference the bishop could by consultation decide 
whether the transfer could be made and act ac- 
cordingly. 

You can see from the above how much the church 
missed by not making me a bishop when I was 
young. 

I think you were selling your paper as it was at 
a price too low but now that you have enlarged 
it you will have to hustle if you make ends meet. 
We have a whole state and over 20,000 Methodists 
and sell our paper for $2 a year and pay the 
editors and barely keep free from debt. Nowhere 
can any people get such reading matter for such 
a price. 

I am now nearing the end of my 75 years. In 
a few days I will enter my 76th year. I am very 
helpless and there is no hope that I will be any 
better. 

I keep up with the world with my three dailies. 
I suffer no pain, have a good appetite and sleep 
for six or seven hours pretty soundly. I have 
nothing to complain of and everything to be thank- 
ful for. I have a very choice library of very ex- 
cxellent books and I am glad to say I can yet read 
even though I cannot walk. 

My heart goes out to your people of the Pied- 
mont hills — a cleverer folk don't exist in this com- 
monwealth. 

My religion is my support in these disabled days 
and I ask my friends to pray that my faith shall 
never fail. The Bible is more and more precious 
and the old hymns meet all the cravings of my 
heart and they are my comfort in many a weary 
hour of the long winter nights. I think I could 
almost repeat the old hymn book and Watts, Wes- 
ley, Dodridge and Newton are still my favorites. 
I care little for the new hymns so popular be- 
cause of their lively airs. Vineville, Ga. 



MY EXPERIENCE WITH THE EVERY-M EM BER 
CANVASS 

Rev. R. H. Bennett, in the "Missionary Voice." 

Court Street Church, Lynchburg, Va., adopted 
the Every-Member Canvass four years ago simul- 
taneously with the proposition to put up a twenty- 
thousand-dollar building at Soochow University. 
The year before the church had raised in the con- 
gregation for foreign missions $1,868.88. During 
the four years since the adoption of the Every- 
Member Canvass the church has averaged more 
than five thousand dollars per year for foreign 
missions in the congregation, going over six thou- 
sand dollars for two of these years. These figures 
are in addition to what the various missionary 
societies and the Sunday school rained. 

Progress in all Lines 

During these four years the church has gone 
forward in all its varied work. Over three hun- 
dred members have been received. A costly and 
beautiful set of chimes has been installed. Im- 
portant improvements to the church building have 
been made. The official members testify that they 
have been four of the best years in the church's 
history. Indebtedness Removed 

For eight or ten years there have been floating 
obligations carried in bank "by our church. Two 
years ago they amounted to about $3,000. Since 
that time they have all been paid off without any 
public collection or private appeal being made for 
them, having been liquidated through fhe regu- 
lar offerings of the congregation. The church will 
close this Conference year with all books balanced 
and without a cent of indebtedness of any kind 
against it. 

Enthusiasm for foreign missions helps every 
other part of church life. The anti-missionary 
church is dead while she liveth. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 4, 1912 



From the Field 

* 

NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. A. L. Coburn, who has been living in 
Salisbury during the past year, has recently moved 
to Hendersonville. 

— Revs. H. K. Boyer and C. A. Wood went to 
Nashville "last week to attend the Conference of 
Missionary Secretaries of the M. E. Church, South. 

— We are glad to learn that Rev. M. T. Smathers 
lias made a fine impression at Taylorsville and on 
the Alexander Circuit and that he has fine pros- 
pects of a very successful year. 

— Miss Pearl Wakefield, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. T. C. Wakefield, of Lenoir, was happily mar- 
ried to Mr. J. H. Beard, also of Lenoir, on Wednes- 
day evening, December 20, Rev. C. M. Pickens, 
officiating. 

— Mr. A. T. Niven, one of the most substantial 
citizens of Anson county and a leading and active 
member of our Church on the Polkton Circuit died 
at his home at Peachland last week after a lin- 
gering illness. 

— Mrs. Abernethy, wife of Rev. W. E. Abernethy, 
pastor of Spring Garden church, returned from 
Baltimore on Saturday evening. Mrs. Abernethy 
has been under treatment for some time at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. We are glad to learn that she 
is very much improved. 

— Rev. Asbury C. McNeer, brother of Rev. J. 
L. McNeer, of Asheboro Circuit, W. N. C. Confer- 
ence, died of pneumonia at his home near Alder- 
son, W. Va., Dec. 19th, 1911. He had been a mem- 
ber of the Baltimore Conference, M. E. Church, 
South, since the spring of 1871. 

— Miss Kate Ardrey, daughter of the late Dr. 
J. A. Ardrey, of Mecklenburg, was married to Mr. 
James H. Belk at the home of her mother, Mrs. 
Eliza M. Ardrey in Fort Mill, S. C, on Thursday, 
Dec. 28, by Rev. W. S. Hales, of Stanley, assisted 
by Rev. T. J. White, of Fort Mill. 

— A note from Rev. D. M. Litaker informs us 
that he has about recovered from the attack of ma- 
larial fever from which he has suffered since Con- 
ference and that he filled his pulpit at Hickory 
last Sunday. It will be good news to his friends 
that he now expects to be able to go right along 
with his work. 

—Rev. Dr. W. F. Tillett, Dean of the Theological 
faculty o fVanderbilt University, spent a few days 
last week with his brother, Mr. Charles W. Til- 
lett, of Charlotte. Dr. Tillett was returning to 
Nashville from a trip abroad where he spent sev- 
eral months as a rest period after twenty-six years 
of continued service. 

— A Christmas cantata rendered by the choir of 
Centenary church on Sunday night before Christ- 
mas and repeated last Sunday night by request 
was greatly enjoyed by large congregations. There 
were some very fine voices and the whole choir 
sang with great effect. There was fine expression, 
and even the solo parts were sung in the English 
language instead of being warbled out in an un- 
known tongue. 

— The members of the Ireland Bible Class of 
West Market Street Sunday school did the hand- 
some thing on Sunday morning, December 24th, 
in presenting their faithful teacher, Mr. C. H. Ire- 
land, with a fine life-size portrait of the late Bishop 
Charles B. Galloway. The gift was a spontaneous 
expression of love and affection the members of 
the class feel for their teacher and was accepted 
by Mr. Ireland in the same spirit. The picture 
will hang on the walls of the class room as an 
inspiration to the men who attend the class. 

— We are glad to learn that Dr. E. L. Stamey 
who left Greensboro several years ago for Hooker- 
town, Greene county, where he has been successful- 
ly engaged in the practice of medicine will return 
to the city about March 1 and become medical di- 
rector of Keeley Institute. He will succeed Dr. 
A. L. Petree, who will engage in private practice 
along a special line for which he has been prepar- 
ing himself for several years. Dr. Stamey and his 
estimable family will receive a warm welcome by 
many friends in Greensboro, who hold them in 
the highest esteem. 

— Mention was made in a recent issue that Rev. 
E. P. Green of the South Carolina Conference ask- 
ed for and was granted a location at the recent 



session of this Conference. Since that we learn 
from the newspapers that .he has been received 
into the Episcopal church and will secure work 
in that communion. It will be remembered that 
he was received into our church from the Episco- 
pal church at the session of 1901 at Gastonia. Af- 
ter serving a number of charges he transferred to 
South Carolina. We trust he may find congenial 
work and a wide field for usefulness in his new 
relation. 

— Rev. Elwood Smith, a local preacher of Iredell 
county, died at his home near Eagle Mills on 
Tuesday night of last week. Brother Smith was 
about seventy years old, a consecrated Christian 
and a loyal Methodist. He was a great friend of 
the Advocate and always took an interest in its 
circulation. The Statesville Landmark, giving an 
account of his death says: "He took an active 
interest in public affairs, especially in county af- 
fairs. He was a progressive citizen and at all 
times -gave his aid and influence to any movement 
for the upbuilding of the county and the promo- 
tion of the public welfare. He was in all respects 
a good man and a good citizen and will be greatly 
missed. 

—An interesting and suggestive item of news is 
the announcement that Mr. Isaac Hammer, a 
wealthy citizen of the ' State of Kansas, has given 
$30,000 to Sylvan Academy in Alamance county, 
The bequest consists of 640 acres of land in Kan- 
sas, which is to be used as a permanent endow- 
ment. We say blessings on the men of wealth 
who think of the smaller schools in our country 
which are becoming more and more essential to the 
success of a system of Christian education. We 
are praying that the Lord may open the hearts 
of some men who will do the same thing for 
Rutherford, Weaverville, Davenport and Jefferson. 
We know of nothing just now offering a finer op- 
portunity for the wise investment of accumulated 
wealth. 



WALNUT COVE 

Rev. J. H. Brendall, the pastor, writes that his 
mother died at the old family home in Macon 
County, December 7th. Also that the sick ones of 
his own family have about recovered. Referring 
to the change of appointments, he says: 

"Many thanks to Bishop Hoss and Brother Tay- 
lor for letting me stay, and many more to this 
kind people for making the request in our behalf, 
also for increasing the salary over last year." 



DENTON CIRCUIT 

We were sent by Conference to labor for the 
coming year on the Denton charge. We arrived 
here Dec. 23, and received a warm welcome from 
the people in the shape of a good pounding as soon 
as we began to keep house. We have made the 
first round to each one of the six churches on the 
charge. The people were glad to see us and all 
the meetings were well attended and everything 
bids fair for a good year's work. 

J. A. Holmes. 



MICAVILLE CIRCUIT 

We have had a nice Christmas. Everything pass- 
ed off nicely but we didn't let the turkey off light 
though. Brother Editor, I wish you and the good 
brethren could see the great big turkeys and big 
hogs and great big tables full too, and stay around 
these good folks. You never would want to leave. 
We are busy with our parsonage work — building a 
nice house for the pastor of Micaville Circuit. Also 
we are dusting and fixing for our good old presiding 
elder, so we haven't any time to lose. 

We admire the Concord Plan very much. 

H. H. Mitchell, Pastor. 



RUFFIN CIRCUIT 

We are now settled in our new home in Reidsville. 
I have been around to my churches and find 
that I have a fine people to serve. They are pleas- 
ant and kind, and I trust my people and I will 
have a very successful year in all the work of the 
Church. We had a very pleasant quarterly Confer- 
ence at Ruffin, the third Sunday in December, and 
Brother Ware did some good preaching. The peo- 
ple of Reidsville have been very kind and generous 
to us, and have evidenced the same by a very sub- 
stantial pounding, for which we return our thanks, 
and wish for them the richest blessings from the 
Giver of all good. B. A. York. 



RURAL HALL 

I wish to express in some measure my apprecia- 
tion of the very cordial reception that the good 
people of Rural Hall have given us. Which cordial- 
ity has been evidenced by kind words and liberal 
pounding. On -Dec. 22nd, I was notified that there 
were two boxes at the depot for me, so, with the 
aid of the "sheriff," we carried them to the parson- 
age. On opening them, we found that Trinity had 
pounded us with almost everything that is carried 
in a grocery store, including Santa Claus for the 
children. Sister Wolf, of Rural Hall, sent a large 
cake. Sister West, of Antioch, sent curtains for 
the parsonage. The 22nd was a good day for the 
occupants of the parsonage. . May God bless the 
good people of the Rural Hall Circuit and help us 
to give them a year of service. 

G. W. Williams, P. C. 



GRACE CHURCH, WINSTON 

Last night at 7:30 on interesting meeting took 
place at Grace Methodist Church, when Mr. W. A. 
Lasley read a fine report of the year's work in the 
congregation. This included the organization of 
the chorus choir, and of the Senior Epworth League; 
the increase in the Sunday school and other de- 
partments; the open air services held during the 
summer; and the large number added to the 
church roll. 

The pastor made a New Year's appeal for heart- 
iest co-operation, which met with a ready response 
from the church members. 

After a brief evangelical appeal, a large number 
of young men and others made the decision to en- 
ter the new year as Christians. — Winston Daily 
Sentinel. 



STANLEY CREEK 

At the last Annual Conference, two churches, Mt. 
Island and River Bend, were transferred to the Mt. 
Holly work from mine, and, in lieu of these High 
Shoals and Trinity were given me. I have been 
to each of these churches and am much pleased 
with the situation and am looking forward to a 
good year for 1912. I have received thus far, 
since Conference, 10 new members by certificate 
with more to follow. 

I have met with a warm welcome at my new 
churches. On Friday night, Dec. 22nd, onr friends 
at Stanley kindly remembered the preacher's family, 
replenishnig the larder and pantry, all of which 
is duly appreciated and is being greatly enjoyed. 
May we be able to prove ourselves worthy of their 
kindness; and may our Father requite them. 

W. S. Hales. 



CONFERENCE BROTHERHOOD 

Rev. W. P. McGhee, having been a member of oui 
Conference Brotherhood, and having died on Dec. 
22nd, 1911, his claim becomes the recipient of assess- 
ment No. 4 in the Brotherhood. The names oi 
those who have paid this assenssment since my 
last report are as follows: J. F. Moser, J. H. 
Weaver, S. M. Davis, J. W. Wheeler, W. R. Ware, 
R. M. Hoyle, M. T. Steele and W M. Robbins. Total 
number who have paid, 27. January 23, 1912 is the 
limit of the time given for the payment of this as- 
sessment. 

On account of the death of Rev. W. P. McGee, I 
hereby call for assessment No. 5, to be paid by 
February 26, 1912. W. A. Wilson and M. T. Steele 
have paid this assessment. 

C. M. Pickens, Sec. & Treas. 

Lenoir, N. C. 



SPLENDID POUNDING AT COLERIDGE 

On Christmas evening we were sitting quietly in 
our home at the parsonage, and on looking out 
of the window, we observed a long line of wagons 
and buggies driving up to the door. After alight- 
ing they made headway for the dining room where 
they deposited many articles for the larder and 
granary, which it would be tiresome to 
mention. On some of the parcels and pack- 
ages we noticed the names of W. R. Craven, 
Ruth Craven, W. C. Craven, Mrs. Lewis Craven, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Caveness, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Caveness, Floyd and Edna Caveness, Mr. and Mrs. 
D. F. Raines, Obert Raines, Mrs. J. R. Cheek, Mr. 
and Mrs. O. W. Ward, Eula Ward, Edgar Ward, 
Mrs. Chas. Craven, Mr. D. F. Davis, Mrs. Florence 
Gray, Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. 



January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



J. L. Wright, Dr. Burgess, R. L. Moffitt, Mr. and 
Mrs. B. F. Moffitt, R. H. Brady, Rosa Gardner, 
Maud, Ethel and Edwin Cox, J. M. Brooks, H. F. 
Brown, Ed. Whitehead, Mrs. Delia Brown, and 
James H. Brower. Some of the packages were not 
labeled, so I beg pardon if I have failed to men- 
tion any of the donors. Last year the people of 
Coleridge circuit gave me one of the most pleasant 
years of my ministry. I was very glad to be re- 
turned to them for the second year. I do not feel 
I am worthy of the repeated kindnesses they have 
shown me, but I am determined by the help of 
the Lord to render my best service to them, and 
pray we will have another successful year. 

R. L. Melton. 



CONFERENCE ON EVANGELISM 

There was held in the Assembly Room, in our 
Publishing House in Nashville, Tenn., on the 20th 
and 21st of December, a Conference on Evangelism, 
This is the first Conference of the kind that has 
been held any where or at any time, in our Method- 
ism, so far as I know. 

Rev. John M. Moore, the Home Mission Secretary 
of our Board of Missions, I suppose is the father of 
the Conference. 

Dr. Pinson, the Senior Secretary, was presented 
and opened the first session of the Conference with 
an appropriate Scripture reading, a fine speech, and 
an earnest prayer, showing that he was heartily in 
accord with the work of the Conference. Dr. Moore 
delivered a well prepared speech on "The Object of 
Conference on Evangelism," and presented a well 
arranged program for a two days Conference, which 
was carried out successfully. 

The most of the Evangelists of the M. E. Church, 
South, were present, and all showed a willingness to 
submit themselves and their work to the Church, 
and expressed themselves as favoring an official 
Evangelism to supply this much needed arm of ser- 
vice in a regular and official way. 

Dr. E. B. Chappell, our Sunday School Editor and 
Secretary, made an admirable speech to the Confer- 
ence in which he defined the place of the Evange- 
list in the Christian Church. The Conference 
passed a resolution requesting the publication of the 
address by Dr. Moore, in the most convenient medi- 
um through which it would reach all of our preach- 
ers and people. 

There were a number of good speeches made by 
men who were well qualified to discuss the questions 
to which they were assigned. The general expres- 
sion of opinion was: "The speeches were all good." 

The spirit of the Conference was truly Christian, 
and all enjoyed the meeting fully. There were 
several Committees appointed who worked out in 
Committee meetings the subjects submitted to them, 
in such a way as will no doubt do the cause of 
religion and its spread good. 

The proceedings of the Conference will be pub- 
lished for the information of the Church by our 
efficient Secretary of the Home Department of the 
Mission Board. 

In this short and imperfect writeup of the Con- 
ference, my object is to call attention to the im- 
portant meeting and advertise the proceedings, 
which you are exhorted to read when they come 
out through the medium which Dr. Moore may 
choose. 

L. L. Nash. 

Hamlet, N. C, Dec. 23, 1911. 



IMPRESSIONS AT THE WASHINGTON CONFER- 
ENCE ON THE EVILS OF THE INTER- 
STATE LIQUOR TRAFFIC 

That National legislation will soon be enacted 
forbidding the blind tigers to supply themselves 
with liquor under inter-state commerce laws, is 
believed by all who attended the recent conference 
in Washington, D. C. 

Read the following statements from some of our 
representatives: 

"I was well pleased with the Washington meeting. 
It was the only meeting, yet held, that really im- 
pressed the Congressmen, in my opinion. Congress- 
men who have heretofore been silent on the subject 
were outspoken iu the advocacy of some measure 
that would bring the desired relief to prohibition 
territory. It would be a good plan to hold all Na- 
tional meetings in Washington." — Mr. J. J. Farris, 
delegate from a mass meeting of citizens in High 
Point. 

"Words are inadequate to express my impression 



of the convention. I had attended the one In Nor- 
folk, Va., in 1907, and I was astonished to see the 
dimension reached in the work since then. The 
lines upon which the work is executed are some- 
what different and more telling. Different classes 
are being enlisted now that were not then. The 
leading men of our land, jurists, statesmen, soldiers, 
ministers, laymen and women and boys are working 
to succeed. The cause cannot down. God is behind 
it." — Rev. G. L. Bearden, delegate from the North 
Carolina Conference. 

"The Greatest Convention of all" was the verdict 
expressed regarding the recent convention at Wash- 
ington. The convention and conference represent- 
ed the most thoroughly combined forces of temper- 
ance determined upon unrelenting war against the 
most completely united forces of the liquor traffic. 
I was profoundly impressed with the conviction 
that more of our National leaders have become 
aroused at the threatening peril of our nation's dead- 
liest foe; and have determined upon an enlarged, 
aggressive campaign of extermination. There is a 
wide-spread, growing conviction that a crisis has 
arisen, when as never before, national enactment 
is necessary for local option law enforcement, pro- 
tection of States' rights and prevention of conflict 
between federal and state laws. A great Christian 
nation that prohibits interstate shipment of infected 
cattle can ill ignore the righteous appeal of so many 
loyal citizens for protection against our most dread- 
ful national pestilence, whose infection breeds pov- 
erty, disease and death. I believe a wisely directed 
campaign of united temperance forces can secure 
such national enactment." — Rev. S. B. Turpentine, 
D. D., delegate from Western North Carolina Con- 
ference. 

"Do I believe our national congress will amend? 
Certainly they will. I believe the fairness of the 
non-political bill, which the National Conference 
which we have just attended is placing before 
them, will receive the support of every member who 
is not fettered, and who believes in a square deal. 
However, if the majority are found fettered, in time 
a new brood, thoroughly inoculated with the "square 
deal" idea, will take their places." — Mr. R. L. Urn- 
berger, representative from some of the churches 
of Concord. 

"I consider the convention and conference held 
in Washington at the call of the Anti-Saloon League 
of America the most inspiring and enthusiastic 
meetings it has been my privilege to attend. The 
meetings were composed of leading men and wo- 
men from almost every state of our Union, also of 
Canada and Wales. There was a spirit of earnest- 
ness of purpose and determination to conquer. Hope- 
fulness also characterized the meetings. The out- 
spoken encouragement of Congressmen of the relief 
being granted by this Congress to the prohibition 
states of the Union for the controlling of inter-state 
shipments of liquor." — Mr. Walter White, delegate 
from the Friends' Church. 

"The convention of the Anti-Saloon League and 
the conference that followed were great gatherings. 
Great for the reason that a cause was being advo- 
cated. Great because composed of a large number 
of brave representative men from thirty-nine states. 
Great because of the conscience and brain power 
on the program and in the discussions. Great 
because of the impression it made. The hopeful 
indications for National legislation to prevent inter- 
state shipment of liquor into dry are: The people 
are gathering together to go after it to get it: it 
is right, is necessary, hence must be; a few sen- 
ators and a number of representatives in Congress 
favor it from the heart and are not afraid." — Rev. 
T. M. Johnson, delegate from the Methodist Protes- 
tant Church: 

"The National Convention, held in Washington, 
D. C, December ll-14th, was one of the greatest 
meetnigs I ever attended. The personnel was un- 
usual. Men and women, whose faces showed clean 
life, high character and a strong, determined spirit, 
were there for business. The addresses and papers 
were well prepared and impressively delivered. 
The presence of senators, governors, and congress- 
men was encouraging. All were of one mind as to 
the evil of the liquor traffic and the shameful par- 
ticipation of our national government in it. Sure- 
ly we shall get some legislation from Congress to 
protect dry states from this lawless and iniquitous 
business." — 

Rev. Bernard P. Smith, delegate from the Christ- 
ian (Disciples) Church: 

"The spirit of harmony .and determination seen 
in the recent conference held at Washington, D. C. 



gives us assurance that National legislation will be 
forthcoming. This convention shows that lawmak- 
ers and citizens are getting together on this propo- 
sition, each desirous that the present attitude of the 
National government towards the enforcement of 
state prohibitory laws should be corrected. This 
was not a convention of preachers and women only, 
though they were both there and their influence 
felt, but a convention of judges, law-makers, labor- 
men, bishops, educators and citizens from every 
rank and file, with the one purpose of securing 
National legislation that would be just to all sover- 
eign states." Rev. R. L. Davis, appointee of the 
Gavernor of North Carolina. 



THE CALL OF A CRISIS FOR THE PRAYERS OF 
A PEOPLE 

The time is evidently upon us when God is call- 
ing upon the church for a more vigorous and united 
effort for the evangelization of the world. By every 
indication the faith, courage and concentration of 
the Church is being challenged. To retreat or to 
stand still at this time of world opportunity and 
national unrest would be to deny and disobey the 
plain will of our Lord. 

In planning and praying for an advance move- 
ment in missions it has become plain to us that 
such a movement must begin in prayer. "We must 
advance on our knees." Nothing else can set the 
whole church in the right attitude or bring the 
needed power. Hence it has been decided in the 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Missionary 
Council and by the Secretaries of the General Board 
and by the unanimous vote of the large and rep- 
resentative body of men now in session in the Mid- 
winter Institute that a call should go forth for a day 
of fasting and prayer. January 11th, has been fixed 
upon as a suitable day. We earnestly request our 
pastors, congregations, Missionary Societies and 
Missionary Committees throughout the entire 
church to observe that day as a day of fasting, 
humiliation and prayer. 

From the closet of secret prayer, from the family 
altar, from the circles of leaders and workers, and 
from the hearts of congregations everywhere let a 
wave of contrite, earnest, united prayer rise up and 
sweep over the entire church. Let us confess our 
lack of vision, our inertness in the face of inspir- 
ing opportunity, our prayerlessness and illiberality 
and cry for forgiveness and a fresh commission from 
heaven. 

Let us pray for a clearer apprehension of duty, 
a keener sense of our supreme obligations to lost 
men and a truer loyalty to Jesus Christ; for the 
heathen, that in their measureless need and deep 
unrest they may turn to»Christ for light and peace; 
for the missionaries that they may be kept brave 
and strong and patient, and preserved in peace 
amid storm and danger; to the Lord of the harvest 
that he will call and send forth the strong and 
suitable men and women into his harvest; for the 
Board of Missions and its Secretaries that they 
may have wisdom, courage and power for their 
task. 

This call grows out of the needs and opportunities 
of the hour. It is a time to fall on our faces that 
from our humiliation our Great Captain may call 
us to rise and go forward. Shall we not heed the 
call, not as official, but as providential and offer 
to Heaven the spectacle of a whole church on its 
knees? 

For the cause and co-workers. 

W. W. Pinson. 



MICAVILLE CIRCUIT 

The opportunity of having Rev. H. H. Mitchell 
with us in Western N. C. is a great one. 

All who have heard him preach have been great- 
ly impressed with the remarkable personality of 
Brother Mitchell, who preaches a plain, practical 
sermon with great power, simplicity and love. 
There is no cant about this divine. When Rev. and 
Mrs. Mitchell arrived to take charge of the work 
they were most corlially met and invited by the 
people to dwell in their homes and received warm 
welcome from the people. 

Rev. Mitchell's first sermon brought tears to the 
eyes of all who listened to him. 

Annie Tifton. 



— George H. Cavin and Miss Violet Harris were 
married at the residence of the bride's father, Jas. 
C. Harris, at McAdenville, Dec. 24th, 1911, the cere- 
mony being performed by Rev. James Willson. 



Page Eight 



Foreign Mission Department 

Mrs. D. M. Litaker, Press Superintendent, Hickory, N. C. 



YOUR STAR FOR 1912 

I watch the stars of the evening sky 
Grow bright as the shadows fall, 
And carefully scan them, one by one, 
Till the brightest of them all 
Sends sparkling light in the distant 
blue; 

And I consecrate that star to you. 

And I say, "Dear star with the silver 
gleam 

Watch faithfully to-night, 
Keep in safety's path the feet 
And keep the soul-path white; 
Where dangers lurk, when foes are 
near 

Oh Guiding Star, shine bright and 
clear!" 



ANOTHER REMINDER 

Only a few more days in which to 
pay up all our obligations to our 
societies. Much can be -""one if we 
work with heart and brain even in the 
short time that remains to us. Send 
your dues, your Conference expense 
fund, your pledge, your specials to 
your auxiliary treasurer. Don't wait 
for her to come to you. 



The following Christmas message 
from Miss Terrie Buttrick, who is so 
near to the hearts of the women of 
our Conference Society, will be of in- 
teerest to old and young alike. We 
suggest that it be read aloud at the 
next monthly meeting of our societies 
so that all may be instructed and edi 
fled by it. We are always delighted 
to hear from those "at the front." 

Christmas, 1911. 
My Dear Mrs. Litaker and Missionary 

Workers: 

Again I am happy to send you 
Christmas greetings from Mexico. 

Although the country is disturbed 
by wars and rumors of wars, many 
preparations are being made for 
Christmas. It is an important part 
of the Catholic religion to do this. 
Nearly the entire month of December 
is filled with Catholic feasts and cere- 
monies. The eighth is kept as a holi- 
day in honor of the Immaculate Con 
ception. The twelfth is honored as 
Guadalupe Day, when feasts are held 
sacred to the patron saint of Mexico. 
On this day pilgrims come many miles 
to worship at the shrine. 

On the sixteenth the "posadas" be- 
gin. There are ceremonies held in 
the homes and churches every night 
until the twonty-fourth. Little images 
oE Joseph and Mary are carried at 
the head o° a procession of priests and 
others carrying lighted candles. This 
represents the journey to Bethlehem 
and the attempt to get lodgings on 
the way. 

In the homes this ceremony ends 
up with a dance and muel: merry 
making. On the night of the twenty- 
fourth the Baby Jesus is presented. 
After being borne in the procession, 
the little image is kissed and made 
the object of much devotion. In the 
dance which follows, it is placed in 
a large handkerchief or something 
similar, and "rocked to sleep" by a 
young man and a young woman. 
These two persons thus become the 
god-father and god-mother of the baby. 
The baby is "awakened" on the sixth 
of January, the Day of the Three 
Kings." On this day gifts are ex- 
changed instead of on Christmas day. 

They do not have a Christmas tree 
but there is a "nacimiento" (birth 
place) in each home. If a family be 
wealthy a whole room is devoted to 
the nacimiento, but if the people are 
poor, only a little corner of a room 
can be afforded. 

A grotto is represented under a hill 
covered with little trees and greens. 
Toy animals, fowls and birds are 
placed around it. The center of at- 



traction is the Holy Family surround- 
ed by the shepherds and wise men 
The rich people spend a great deal of 
money in making these places as 
beautiful as possible with tiny foun- 
tains, etc. Tapers are kept burning 
in front of this shrine until the sixth 
of January. 

On the night of the fifth of January 
the children place their shoes in the 
windows to receive the gifts from the 
Three Kings who are expected to pass. 

How differently the season is kept 
in our mission schools! 

In Mary Keener Institute we have 
over two hundred children and we are 
trying to teach them the true meaning 
of Christmas. The kindergarten and 
primary departments have prepared a 
very interesting program for an enter- 
tainment. The parents have been in- 
vited and those who attend will learn 
why we celebrate Christmas. 

Many of the children, by the instruc- 
tions of their teachers, have made lit- 
tle gifts for those in the Children's, 
Hospital. 

The Sunday school is preparing to 
have a beautiful service also and the 
"Message of the Christmas Star" will 
be emphasized by means of recita- 
tions, drills, songs and anthems. At 
the close of the entertainment, can- 
dies, nuts and small gifts will be given 
in star shaped boxes. No Santa Claus 
will be introduced to detract from the 
spirit and meaning of the service. 

Many pleasant surprises were plan- 
ned to make happy our boarding girls. 
Missionaries and teachers will remem- 
ber them with gifts. Christmas is 
kept here in our home in the same 
sweet way as it is in the Scarritt Bi- 
ble and Training School and our girls 
love it so much. 

Our Chinese Sunday school has been 
well attended this year and the mem- 
bers are going to give a Christmas en- 
tertainment also. 

My heart was made very glad lasv 
Sunday because one of my Chinese 
pupils joined our church. He makes 
the fourth Chinaman who has joined 
within a year. 

Christmas looks very bright to us 
within our own walls but when we go 
out on the streets and see hundreds 
of miserable people who have nevei 
had any real joy in their lives our 
hearts grow sad. The neglected, home- 
less children arouse our tenderest 
sympathy. It is impossible for me to 
describe their condition to you in a 
way you would understand because 
you have never seen anything like it. 
Half clad news boys wrap up in their 
left over papers and sleep upon the 
stone steps of our church and yet we 
are helpless to do anything for them. 
The nights are cold and these half 
starved little ones are chilled to the 
marrow. 

We know that He who slept in a 
manger looks upon these unclaimed 
ones with love and pity and we are 
praying him to put it into the hearts 
of those who are in authority to have 
a home built for the homeless and give 
them a chance to make something in 
life. 

May the sweetest of Christmas joys 
be yours and may its blessings at- 
tend you throughout the New Year. 

Yours with love, 
Terrie Etta Buttrick, 
Mary Keener Institute, Mexico City. 



ANOTHER UNITED SOCIETY 

Dear Mrs. Litaker: 

We have often felt inclined to let 
you and our friends hear from us as 
a Missionary Society, through the Ad- 
vocate. No one had been assigned 
the duty, and consequently no one as- 
sumed it. 

The Foreign Missionary Society and 



the Home Mission Society met togeth- 
er at the parsonage, December 1, 3, 
p. m. 

Devotional services were conducted 
by our much loved president of the 
Foreign Society, Mrs . R. G. Tuttle. 
The week of prayer was observed. 
Brazil was the study. Freewill offer- 
ings were made for the girls' school 
in Rio de Janeiro. 

The subject of uniting the two so- 
cieties was discussed. A unanimous 
vote was cast in favor of uniting. Now, 
we are known as "The Woman's Mis- 
sionary Society of Elkin M. E. Church, 
South." We meet the first and sec- 
ond Fridays in each month. 

Officers for the coming year were 
elected as follows: 

President— Mrs. R. G. Tuttle. 

1st Vice-President — Miss Maudt 
Ring. 

2nd Vice-President — Mrs. Raymond 
Chatham. 

3rd. Vice-President — Mrs. R. L. Hub- 
bard. 

4th Vice-President — Mrs. Alex Chat- 
ham, Sr. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Alex 
Chatham, Jr. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Robt. 
Lewis. 

Agent Missionary Voice — Mrs. Etta 
Paul. 

Treasurers — Mesdames E. F. McNeer 
and G. T. Roth. 

Press Superintendent — Mrs. John S. 
Roth. 

Asst. Press Superintendent — Mrs. 
S. H. Wilmoth. 

This meeting was closed with sen- 
tence prayers, asking the Heavenly 
Father for wisdom and strength ana 
divine guidance for the coming year 
and returning thanks for the many 
blessings in the past. 

The literary meeting was held at 
the parsonage on the second Friday at 
3 p. m. The president presided at 
this meeting. Hymn 635 was sung, 
and the first chapter of Ruth was read 
and commented upon. Our pastor, 
Rev. R. G. Tuttle, led the prayer, full 
of earnest petition, especially for the 
officers who were to be installed. 

Our pastor conducted the installa- 
tion services which were very impres- 
sive. 

A solo was very sweetly and ten- 
derly sung by Mrs. Raymond Chatham. 

Several interesting items in connec- 
tion with the Home Department were 
read by different members. It was 
suggested that each member of our 
society remember Miss Lucinda B. 
Helm's birthday, December 23rd, by 
sending as many pennies as she is 
years old or more. 

One member, whose birthday comes 
on this same date, will celebrate it by 
sending fifty dollars. She says "one 
dollar for each year and one to grow." 

China was the subject of the For- 
eign Department. Pictures of all our 
women missionaries to China and sev- 
eral of the school buildings were at- 
tractively arranged so that all could 
see them and become more familiar 
with the work in China. 

Mrs. Mason Lillard read an inter- 
esting paper, "The Little Chinese 
Girl." "Tell It Out" was sung with 
enthusiasm and the meeting closed 
with a short prayer by our pastor. 

Mrs. Tuttle had prepared a feast of 
good things for us. She introduced 
to the society "The Little Chinese 
Girl." This was the attractive little 
Miss Emily Tuttle dressed in the cos- 
tume of a little Chinese girl. She 
served "Chinese salad" to all the mem- 
bers, which ahfforded much pleasure. 

This little Chinese girl was assisted 
by her mother and father in serving 
delicious confectioneries: stuffed 
dates, chocolate seafoam, mints and 
salted peanuts. We have had quite 
a number of social meetings connected 
with the work during the year. The 
societies have accomplished much it 



a financial way and we trust have re- 
ceived and given out much spiritual 

help. 

Sincerely, 
Mrs. John S. Roth, 

Elkin, N. C. 



We are not surprised to hear of El- 
kin doing things that count and do- 
ing them in a most delightful way. 
Never have we been associated with 
a more loyal, generous and high-mind- 
ed body of women than those who 
compose the Missionary society of the 
Elkin Methodist Church. We shall al- 
ways cherish the memory of our fel- 
lowship with them. We wish our cor- 
respondent had felt at liberty to give 
the name of the member whose birth- 
day is the same as Lucinda B. Helm's 
and who gives "one dollar for each 
year and one to grow." Would there 
were more of her kind. — (Editor.) 



LETTER TO LIGHT BEARERS 

My Dear Light Bearer Workers: 

Let me wish for you each one a 
truly joyous Xmas season. And too, 
may the New Year dawn with glad- 
ness and grow brighter all the way 
through. 

This Xmas time will have an add- 
ed interest to me which I have never 
known before. Do you know why? 
You can easily guess I am sure. Yes, 
'tis because this year the Xmas sea- 
son comes right in the midst of har- 
vest time of our year's work. I feel 
anxious to know if all of our fruit 
will be safely in on time. 

I am just hoping that some of youi 
best gifts will go right into the Light 
Bearer Treasury. I know of more 
than one society which has done bet- 
ter work and sent in more money 
than they did last year. Then I know 
some bad news too, but I don't like 
to be the bearer of bad news. 

Dear workers, send me cheery pro- 
gressive reports won't you? God bless 
greatly and cheer graciously the heart 
of every leader who has done her level 
best with, and for your precious chil- 
dren this year. And you dear, dear 
children, I should like to give you 
each a real big Santa-hug and ask our 
Fother to give you the very best of 
Xmas joys and your arms full of toys 
too. Just what you want most. 
Yours in much faith, 

Mrs. G. G. Harley, 
No. 12 North Kerr St. 

Concord, N. C. 



THE CHIEF AMUSEMENT OF CHI- 
NESE BOYS 

"What do the boys play most in 
China?" I asked a missionary. 

The missionary laughed heartily. 
"Kites," he said. 'All the kids up to 
eighty years old fly kites, and I fly 
them too when I am in China. When 
the winter is over and the fields are 
green and the air is balmy once more, 
all the people, young and old, bring 
out their kites. You never saw so 
many kites, and they are all sizes, 
shapes, and colors. It is very exciting 
too; at least I find it so. It looks fun- 
ny at first sight to see grownup and 
aged people take such delight in flying 
kites, but it is surely a simple and 
healthful amusement, and helps to keep 
everybody young." — Selected. 



Mr. Edison is reported to have de- 
clared recently that no person needs 
more than four hours sleep in twenty- 
four. The great electrician now seems 
liable to say most anything. It is a 
pity that one so brilliant should let 
his tongue so frequently run away 
with him 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND 
BUILD UP THE SYSTEM 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
ess Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
^aklng. The formula is plainly printed 
hi every bottle, showing It Is simply 
Julnlne and Iron In a tasteless form, and 
'he most effectual form. For grown peo- 
?>!« and children. SO o*nta. 



January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Home Mission Department 

Conducted by Mrs. W. L. Nicholson 



THE WOMAN WITH THE BROOM, 
NOT "THE MAN WITH THE 
HOE." 

Sweep woman, sweep, the sun is high, 
Thou. hast much work to do today; 
Then nerve thine arm and wield the 
broom , 

And brush the webs of doubt away. 

O woman sweep! put strength into 
thy task. 

'Tis noon, the hours are passing by; 
Give thou no heed to laughs and fears, 
And list not to the idler's cry. 

Sweep on, sweep on, 'tis eventide; 

The day is well nigh past and gone; 
If thou wouldst win, work while 'tis 
day, 

To dewy eve from early dawn. 

Sweep woman, sweep and brush the 
clouds away, 
That gather thick on many a bur- 
dened heart; 

Say some kind word, or fan some fe- 
vered brow, 

O take thy broom and in life do thy 
part. 

There's many a heart if swept and 
cleaned anew, 
Would lift a song of gladsome praise 
on high; 

Then, with a willing hand, take up 
your broom 
And sweep till called to lay your 
weapon by. 

O woman sweep! nor faint beside the 
way, 

Look thou for strength and courage 
to be given; 
Sweep for the right, for all that's good 
and true, 
And never give up till called to 
rest in heaven. 

— Mrs. E. M. Anderson. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Charlotte, N. C, Dec. 29, 1911. 
My Dear Friends: 

When this reaches you nineteen- 
eleven will be numbered with the past, 
nineteen and twelve will have dawn- 
ed. Much will be written concerning 
this new year. The progressive busi- 
ness men will endeavor to put in oper- 
ation plans that call for courage, en- 
terprise and daring. Science will 
make new discoveries, educators will 
adopt new and improved policies. In- 
deed there will be advance in all pre- 
fessions .and in every field of labor. 
Shall the Church of Christ keep pace 
with material development? God 
grant that it may. 

My prayer for that part of it in 
Western North Carolina is that see- 
ing the boundless opportunities and 
responsibilities we may meet them in 
the Spirit of Christ. 

Yoars for service, 
Effie Squires Nicholson. 



Lest some failed to see "The Bugle 
Call for 1912" in the Christmas num- 
ber of the Advocate, we publish it 
again. It is so important and the is- 
sues at stake of so much value that 
we hope no one will fail to read it 
together with the plans for this "for- 
ward movement" which have just 
reached me: 

"Press toward the mark for the 
prize of the high calling of God in 
Christ Jesus." 

The most important and far-reach- 
ing action of the Executive Commit- 
tee of Woman's Missionary Council at 



Endeavor to secure in each auxil- 
iary an offering from each member 
of fifteen cents per week. Find from 
the congregations and auxiliaries of 
each Conference. 

25 persons who will give ....$1.00.00 

50 persons who will give 50.00 

100 persons who will give .... 25.00 
1,000 persons who will give .. 10.00 

This daring enterprise which we 
believe is of God, met with the unan- 
imous consent of the members of the 
committee present and with cordial 
approval of the large majority of the 
Conference Secretaries With a strong 
voice they said, "We will come to the 
help of the Lord, the help of the Lard 
against the mighty." This work is 
undertaken with humility, yet with a 
courage that is born of faith in God. 
"If ye abide in me and my words 
abide in you, ye shall ask what ye 
will, and it shall be done unto you." 
May God help us to abide in Him. 

Relying upon the power of God, 
upon the wide sweep of his promises, 
and the working of his spirit in the 
hearts of His children, shall not our 
women go forward in prayer and faith 
to transform this beautiful vision, 
this "Aim for 1912" into a glorious 
reality, by laying a love offering of 
ourselves and our substance at the 
Master's feet? Are not our women 
strong enough to "attempt great things 
for our Lord?" 

The successful response to this call 
will require unwavering faith, unfail- 
ing vigilance, untiring effort, unyield- 
ing determination, unfaltering trusi., 
unceasing prayer; prayer above and 
underneath, around and within every 
plan, and God above all. 

The method of giving a stated sum 
each week has been tried most suc- 
cessfully in one of the Auxiliaries of 
the Conference which leads all others 
in its contributions to foreign mis- 
sions. A member of that Auxiliary 
says, "Let the minimum gift asked 
from each woman be one dollar per 
month. This in the end would more 
than double our offerings. While 
there may be a few women in our 
auxiliaries that cannot pay twenty 
cents per week, the vast majority can, 
without self-denial, give fifty cents 
per week. This method has been fol- 
lowed in one auxiliary, and the women 
have been surprised with what ease 
they have met the payment." 

The amount mentioned, fifteen cents 
per week, is to include dues. Confer- 
ence Pledge, Incidental Fund, every- 
thing but local work. Direction can 
be given to payments as heretofore. 
If fifteen cents per week from each 
member can be realized, the sum will 
pay all indebtedness, meet all appro- 
priations, and place our present work 
upon a firm basis. Please bear in 
mind that no new work is being un- 
dertaken. God grant that no woman 
may give less this year, but that her 
offerings, whether small or large, may 
be doubled in response to this call. 



Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 15, '11. 
My Dear Mrs. Nicholson: 

Believing that God has spoken to 
us through our needs the Executive 
Committee in the Mid-year meeting 
issued a call for a great forward move- 
ment in 1912. 

After the adjournment of the Com- 
mittee it was found by consultation 
with the secretaries of the Board, that 
a similar movement was being consid- 
ered for the general work of the 
Board; and, in a Secretarial Confer- 
ence composed of the men and wo- 



heard the many calls for enlargement 
from all the fields, we have believed 
that the fullness of time has come 
to lay the condition upon the hearts 
of the women in the Church and call 
for the sum necessary to meet our 
needs and the needs of men and wo- 
men and children who are perishing 
for lack of knowledge of Him who 
alone hath power to save. 

Two years ago the Foreign Board 
passed a resolution to establish a 
school in Rio de Janeiro, Braizil, and 
to erect new buildings at Saltillo, 
Mexico. Thus far this has been im- 
possible as our income has not been 
sufficient to maintain our present 
work. 

There is pressing need at Key 
West, Florida, for more land and a 
boys' dormitory, and the work at Lon- 
don and Brevard is seriously hinder- 
ed for lack of room and equipment, and 
knowing that God has chosen us and 
committed to us our part of saving 
the world we have, after reviewing 
the situation and carefully consider- 
ing the question in an earnest spirit 
of prayer, called upon the women of 
Southern Methodism for greater sacri- 
fice and greater devotion. 

As we look back upon their sacrifice, 
loyalty and devotion and see the great 
things they have undertaken and ac- 
complished for God we believe we are 
right in saying "They can do it and 
they will." 

It will require a large vision, a larg- 
er faith and a larger love, but this 
is our privilege, in Jesus Christ our 
Lord and the women of the church 
in their sacrifice and prayer and 
precious ointment will receive the 
greater blessing. 

Our plan is to ask each woman to 
give fifteen cents a week, sixty cents 
a month, seven dollars a year or to 
become responsible for this sum. 

This can only be accomplished 
through prayer — .for many it will be 
so easy — for many so hard, but there 
is no limit to love and when we are 
working through prayer the impossi- 
ble becomes the possible. 

We are laying this plan upon the 
women in the church, upon the dea- 
conesses in the slums, upon the mis- 
sionaries in the fields and upon the 
teachers in our institutions and when 
we have established a prayer-circle 
around the world would we limit the 
power of God by doubts and fears? 

As one of our secretaries said: 
"God is expecting great things of us." 
We know with Him all things are pos- 
sible. 

May we with one voice say: "We 
can, and we will." 

God has put a new song upon our 
lips. May we sing it with hearts at- 
tuned to His love and "press toward 
the mark for the prize of the high 
calling of God in Christ Jesus." 

Will yo ujoin our prayer-circle? 

Will you have a part in our great 
undertaking? 

Will you observe January 11th as a 
day of fasting and prayer? 

I shall be glad to hear from you ana 
to know that you are praying for this 
great movement and for me, that the 
Spirit of God may lead us into a larger 
service in His name. 

Cordially yours, 
Mrs. H. R. Steele 



THE SUPREME NEED 

The supreme need of the day seems 
to be a consecrated stewardship em 
powered by prayer. 

The supreme need of the church to 
day is for men and women who real 
ize that they are stewards — stewards 
of time, talent, money, energy and a 
capacity to make things go; men and 



the mid-year meeting recently held 
was 

THE BUGLE CALL FOR 1912 

Double Our Membership 
Double Our Offerings 

How? 
PRAY, WORK. GIVE 



men secretaries, plans were adopted 
for a joint campaign of all the forces 
of the Board for the advance move- 
ment along all lines of the work. 

For some time we have realized the 
inadequacy of our present income to 
maintain our work and as we have 



women who realize that all that they 
are, all that they have, is of God, who 
are willing to live their whole life 
to God. 

"As the Father has sent me, so send 
I you" are the words of our Lord and 
Savior Jesus Christ. 



We publish this prayer from Dr. 
Detwiler who has helped us "In every 
time and place" with the hope that it 
may help many "to find themselves" 
in Christ and His work: 

Prayer 

O God our Father, give to the wo- 
men of Southern Methodism love like 
thine that they may see the world 
with the same vision that was always 
before Thy Son. Then give them 
more love that they may feel for the 
world as Christ felt, with a great com- 
passion. Then give them more lov, 
that they may serve the world as He 
served, with a great sacrifice. Then, 
if faith fail not, give them still a full- 
er measure of love that some may 
even die for th e world. Thou hast 
given them talents, and time, and 
money, and opportunity. They lack 
only love in everything; therefore we 
beseech Thee to bestow this miracle- 
working gift without measure upon 
thy handmaidens. 



A BELL WORTH HAVING 

A missionary saw one morning a 
native coming to his house with a 
heavy burden. On reaching it he laid 
on the ground a sack and emptied out 
of it a number of idols. 

"What have you brought these here 
for?" asked the missionary. "I don't 
want them." 

"You have taught us that we do not 
want them, sir," said the native; "but 
we think they might be put to some 
?ood use. Could they not be melted 
down and formed into a bell to call us 
to church?" 

The missionary was pleased. The 
idols were sent to a bell foundry and 
made into a bell, which now calls the 
native converts to praise and prayer. 
— Exchange. 



The Bible is a noble Book, all men's 
Book. It is our first, oldest statement 
of the never-ending problem— man's 
destiny and God's ways with him 
here on earth; and all is such free- 
lowing outlines— granted in its sin- 
cerity and simplicity and its epic 
melody. — Thomas Caryle. 



THE VALUE OF OUR TREES 

We have often wondered if our readers 
and others of the Sunny Southland place 
a proper value on our trees. Are these 
woodland friends of ours— the stately re- 
mains of a once noble forest — fully ap- 
preciated. Would the loss of your most 
beautiful shade trees— the magnificent 
results of a hundred years' growth — 
f hese kind guarlians of your home, 
under whose benevolent shade you and 
perhaps your father before vou plavea 
when a child— would their death ca'us* 
vou regret? The trees are our country's 
most beautiful adornment and not only 
is it our duty to protect them, but the 
value of our property would be greatly 
decreased were they to die. Old tree's 
'ike old friends are not fully appreciated 
until they are dead. Then their loss 
can not be repaired. 

In this connection you should know 
that there are but a very few perfect 
trees, about one out of a hundred. The 
other ninetv-rine are defective in some 
way or other. Decayed bases, rotting 
trunks, broken limbs, split forks, and 
numerous other internal and external in- 
juries that are slowly destroying them. 
Therefore, ninety-nine chances out of a 
hundred, your trees are in just such a 
condition. Your trees can and shoula 
be saved. 

Perhaps you have read of John Davey, 
the tree doctor, and his corps of expert 
tree surgeons. Of how they have mas- 
tered the art of curing diseased and crip- 
Died trees, and preserving them for years 
^f added beautv and usefulness. Evi- 
dence of their work can be seen all over 
the South. In the New Orleans city park, 
a beautiful "ak has been treated, The 
Relmont College for Girls, Nashville. 
Tenn.. has had several magnificent trees 
saved from dis°ase and death. In South 
Carolina, the Wintbrop Normal and In- 
dustrial School at Rockhill, has had its 
heautiful shade trees preserved by the 
navev Tree Experts. Many homes in 
Winston-Salem and other North Carolina 
cities have been beautified by their ex 
pert services. 

This winter, a corps of Davey Tree Sur- 
geons will work from Texas to the At- 
lantic, during the months of December 
to Mav. Hundreds and hundreds of 
Southern trees will be given a new lease 
on life. Write the Davev Tree Expert 
Co.. 127 Magnolia St.. Kent, Ohio, for 
their literature. Perhaps they can send 
a representative to examine vour trees 
without cost to you. They publish a book 
let, sent free on request, entitled "Sav- 
ing the Trees of the South." Send for 
it and at least find out about the won- 
derful work they are doing in the Sunny 
Southland. When writing mention the 
number of trees you own, their kinds, 
and location. 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 4, 1912 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by H. A. Haye«, Superintendent 




ECHOES OF CHRISTMAS 

Every day brings us the joy of man 
Ifest sympathy in our work for the 
children. At every turn we are greet 
ed with smiling faces, kind words, and 
cordial hand clasps. We receive these 
just as we receive money committed 
in trust for the children, and try to 
bring it all home to them. 

Kindness comes to us every day. 
But at Christmas time it comes as an 
overflowing tide. 

Two weeks ago we looked forwarn 
to the coming Christmas with a shade 
of anxiety. Our treasury was empty — 
and it is now. We lacked money for 
necessities, to say nothing of Christ- 
mas presents for the children. 

We are ashamed of that anxiety. 
We might have known that God and 
His good people would provide for the 
little ones. 

It has been so. A week or more 
before Christmas the boxes and bar- 
rels and bundles of all sizes and shapes 
began to come in — all of them filled 
with rich evidences of thoughtfulness 
and love. Next week we will report 
the gifts in detail. 

And money, too. There was enough 
for all our Christmas needs. 

From every direction and from 
most unexpected sources the money 
came, with words like these: "Use 
this to provide a happy Christmas for 
the children." 

If the friends who made these of- 
ferings could have been with us dur- 
ing our Christmas festivities, if they 
could have seen the children, forgetful 
of past sorrows and privations, now 
thoroughly happy, they would have 
felt richly repaid for their gifts. 

We thank you, good friends, one 
and all, and we wish for all of you 
a happy New Year. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS RE- 
CEIVED BY H. A. HAYES, SUPT. 
FOR WEEK ENDING DEC. 
23, 1911 

Mrs. J. L. Woltz, Rockford S. S., 
Rockford Circuit, $2.00; Mrs. J. H. 
Hatch, Tryon St. Bible Class, Char- 
lotte Station, $6.00; R. L. Bowman, 
Wadesboro Station S. S., $12.00; F. 
M. Kincaid, Mountain Grove S. S., 
Table Rock Circuit, $1.85; W. T. Pen- 
ry, Centenary Bible Class, Winston- 
Salem, $41.67; K. L. Craven, Central 
Church S. S., Concord Station, $27.00, 
C. D. Wilkins, Pomona Mill S. S., $1.; 
Guy Weaver, North Asheville Church 
S. S., work day offering, $32.17; To- 
tal, $123.69. Total reported to date 
for Fifth Sunday collections in Octo- 
ber, $1273.35. 

Cash 

W. H. Hobson, Liberty Church, 
Mocksville Circuit, $4.29; J. M. Niven, 
Waxhaw Church, Thanksgiving offer 
ing, Waxhaw Circuit, $5.50; J. H. 
Bost, Tryon Street Baraca Class, sup- 
port of Lionel Vaughan, $8.35; G. Les- 
ter Steele, Christmas offering, $1.00; 
R. H. Leonard, Central Church, Mt. 
Airy Station, $12.10; J. L. Wolfe, 
Trinity Church, Charlotte Station, 
$15.48; Tryon Street Church, Char- 
lotte Station, $53.65; W. E. Merritt, 
Mt. Airy, $5.00; W. L. Dawson, West 
Greensboro Charge, $26.00; J. H. 
Brendall, Walnut Cove & Bethlehem 
churches, Walnut Cove Circuit, $10.00; 
W. L. Killian, Christmas offering, 
$5.00; F. M. Kincaid, Table Rock Cir- 
cuit, work day offering, $2.35; L. L. 
Smith, Advance Church, support fund, 



$11.17; J. S. Martin, Central Church, 
Shelby Station, $9.28; J. T. Ratledge, 
Midway Church, Davidson Circuit, 
$3.00; Prof. E. C. Ward, Prin., Rock 
Hill High School offering, $1.00. To- 
tal, $173.17. 



REPORT OF JOHN F. KIRK, AGT., 
FOR WEEK ENDING DEC. 
23, 1911 

Paid on Subscriptions 

N. Wilkesboro: J. L. Turner, $25.00; 
R. M. Brame, $10.00. Greensboro: A 
Y. Bond, $5.00; W. J. Groome, $5.00. 
Miss Bertha M. Lee, $20.00. Winston 
Salem: H. G. Chatham, $100.00. Al 
bemarle: Miss Ida Ferguson, $5.00 
Lexington: W. C. Wilson, $5.00. Mt. 
Airy: E. C. Foy, $10.00. Rural Hall: 
Thomas James, $2.00; Lizzie James. 
$1.00. Monroe: John W. Yates. 
$10.00. Charlotte: W. H. McCabe 
$100.00. Morganton: W. A. Bailey, 
$1.00. Total, $299.00. 



COME TO SEE US 

Our friends are always welcome tc 
the Children's Home — every day ex- 
cept Sunday. 

On that day we receive visitors only 
from 4:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Come to see us. 

You will be glad to see the children 
The children will be glad to sec 
you. 



A BEAUTIFUL PROMISE 

"The fatherless and the widow 
which are within thy gates shall come 
and shall eat and be satisfied; that 
the Lord thy God may bless thee in 
all the work of thine hand which thou 
doest." 



HOLIDAY MEDITATIONS 

Rev. J. F. Kirk 
If there were serious doubt as tc 
the place that Christ holds in the heart 
of the modern world, Christmas ought 
to dispel it entirely. The world may 
keep its heart hidden for fifty week? 
in the year, but on the last two week? 
it throws aside its reserve and the real 
heart stands revealed. On almost 
every face there is depicted gladness, 
in almost every home there is an add 
ed manifestation of love for one anoth 
er, and all the hustle and activity 
of getting ready for Christmas, there 
is seen a courtesy and a consideration 
for the comfort of others that must 
iprove to us that there is much more 
of goodness, of unslefishness, of love 
— of the Christ spirit in the world than 
we had judged. 

* * * 

Before the delivery clerk's desk at 
the express office on last Saturday, 
threre stood a waiting crowd of more 
than a hundred, of all classes and con- 
ditions, of all hues and colors. As 
quickly as one was served another 
stepped up to take his place. Three 
courteous young men were doing all 
in their power to find Christmas bun 
dies for the crowd. But there was 
little or no signs of impatience. It 
was almost Christmas. Every one has 
a spark of human kindness somewhere 
concealed, and on this particular day 
the spark was aglow and ready to 
flame into a smile or a word of cheer. 

* * * 

The writer was in the crowd await- 
ing his turn to sign for the express 
to the Children's Home. And when the- 
time came, he had to sign and sign 
again, and yet again. The clerk smil- 



ingly asked, "How many wagons have 
you here?" We had only the spring 
wagon, and for this trip it was suffi- 
cient. But there were boxes of toys, 
boxes of apples, boxes of oranges, box- 
es of candies and on top of the load, 
chanticleer to express the exhuberant 
joy of the folks out at the home. 
• • * 

And we believe there was joy In 
the heart of the Master. "Inasmuch 
as ye have done it unto one of the 
least of these, ye have done it unto 
me." Jesus rejoiced with the chil- 
dren, and because the children were 
happy. The joy did not stop there. 
There was joy at the Home, we believe 
there was joy in Heaven, but was then, 
not a glow in the hearts of those good 
kind people who packed those boxes? 
Yes, packed the boxes and prepaid the 
express charges. That was both kind 
and thoughtful. 

*-- » * 

Does Christmas pay? With all the 
?iving of presents, with all the ex- 
oenditure of money, with all the feast- 
ing, with all the hustle and bustle of 
preparation, does Christmas pay? Yes. 
a thousand times over. The fifty weeks 
of the year might well exist just for 
these two. We could well afford to 
'oil and save for all these weeks, in 
order that for two weeks we might 
?pend. It is really better to give than 
to receive. It is better to open the 
heart occasionally, to smile without 
-alculation, to give without counting 
■oo carefully the cost. It pays in the 
increased heart throbs, the widened 
sympathy, the deepened love. Almost 
everybody enters, at least in some sort, 
into the spirit of Christmas. At this 
reason, we are almost, if not altogeth- 
er Christian. Let us thank God for 
the hold that Christ has on this seem- 
ingly sordid and material age. 



THE TOUCH OF SYMPATHY 

We were a little tired the other day 
— tired of the fight — to be frank, tireo 
of trying to do just right when so 
many things seemed to go just wrong. 
li course we had been praying about 
it, but faith was not overcoming as 
it should have been, and we were 
-eaching out here and there for a lit- 
l le touch of human sympathy, when 
our eyes fell upon a little letter that 
Maltbie Babcock once wrote to some 
one in a similar condition of mind 
and state of life. It seemed like a 
oersonal message to us. We had in 
other years felt the real touch of that 
true and generous soul of sympathy. 
3eing dead he was yet speaking. Ah, 
how it lifted and rested! Here are the 
words: "I have thought of you more 
than once lately and wondered how 
things were going. It is a comfort to 
>ook back through the years and think 
what good friends we have been, anc 
then to make a jump into the future 
and know that there the real summer 
season of friendship comes. The best 
things we have known on earth can 
be but small beginnings, little eyes 
and buds on the tree of life that look 
onto the real unfolding of all that life 
and love can mean. I have no doubt 
that life is rather a wearisome thing 
for you nowadays, but comfort your- 
self by knowing that you will fight 
the fight bravely and keep the faith 
loyally." 

Ah, the touch of such a heart often 
changes the whole song of life. — North- 
ern Christian Advocate. 



Young man, my advice to you is, 
that you cultivate an acquaintance 
with, and a firm belief in, the Holy 
Scriptures. This is your certain in- 
terest. — Benjamin Franklin. 



FREE 

Windows of Heaven No 10 

Send me twelve names and address- 
es of music leaders or teachers, writ- 
ten plainly, and I will mall to you a 
copy of my new song book, No. 10. 
The book I have published. J. B. 
VAUGHAN, Athens, Ga. 



ANOTHER TEXAS LETTER 

Editor North Carolina Christian Ad- 
vocate: 

Will you allow a "Tar Heel," tho' 
living in West Texas, a few lines in 
your columns? I note your article in 
last week's issue concerning congrega- 
tional singing, and say "Amen" to it 
all. It is a shame for any preacher 
or choir to do anything to hinder the 
congregation in the song service. I 
don't think it is often done, but prob 
ably Is sometimes. In your commentb 
I think you stop too soon. The fault 
is not altogether with the preacher, 
choir, or congregation, but it is at 
least in part with the Hymnal. 

First, much of the music is very 
difficult, and only experts can sing it 
and many of our village and country 
congregations being void of such tal- 
ent, much of the music and many of 
the hymns are not available. Theti 
again many of the hymns would be 
marred, if not murdered outright, 
if sung even by experts to the music 
to which they are set, the music be- 
ing such as does not give proper ex- 
pression to the hymn. I give just a 
few instances: No. 96, that great hymn 
of Coopers, loses half its beauty and 
power if sung to the tune there print- 
ed. See 137 and you find same. This 
is especially true with 231, the fine 
hymn by Bishop Hoss. 382 separated 
from the old tune, "Bealoth," loses 
much of Its beauty. While to, at 
least, many Southern ears and hearts, 
309 is cold and dead in its setting and, 
"New Britain," not even in the book. 
There are at least a hundred fine 
hymns set to music that it is hard for 
a novice to sing and at least 90 per 
cent of our people are novices when 
it comes to singing. It seems to me 
that the committee had three things 
in view in preparing the music. One 
to please the city choir, another to 
get something new, and another to 
suit the northern fancy, so they put 
in much unsingable music, while they 
left out much that would be new to 
this generation and yet it fits the 
words of many of the hymns admira- 
bly. The last thing that I offer as to 
why many of our "people that have 
some idea of music don't sing, is, the 
words and music are too far apart. 
As a remedy I suggest thatwe have a 
revision of the music, selecting more 
familiar tunes and fitting those that 
we have, in many instances, to the 
word more adapted to their spirit, and 
require that our publishers put at 
least four lines of the words with the 
music. But this will not be a complete 
remedy. The gingling, trashy stuff 
that is pouring from many publishing 
houses, carried by the small singing 
teacher, working in the interest of 
such publishers, has got a mighty grip 
on many country communities and it 
is hard to shake them loose. I have 
been a country and a village preachet 
for 22 years. I used to be a stickler 
for the old hymns, and still insist on , 
using them when I can. But many 
are the times that I have lined my 
hymns and sung them through alone, 
to the most familiar tune I could 
think of with a regular singing class 
in the congregation and not one of 
them would open his or her mouth be- 
cause I would not use their book and 
let them rattle off their jigs that had 
no more of the spirit of worship or 
reverence in them than "Yankee Doo- 
dle" at a back woods frolic. A sense 
of the Holiness of God, and the sacred- 
ness of worship would help wonderful- 
ly in the song service of our churches. 
Let us have the improved hymnal. 
Let us not encourage the buying of a 
new book every few months for Sun- 
day school, but teach the children to 
sing our church hymns and possibly 
the next generation will return to con- 
gregational singing. 

C. D. West. 



We could not get a "Praise the 
Lord" out of some of you people if 
we put you through a wringing ma- 
chine. — Gypsy Smith. 



January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 





THE JOY OF THE NEW YEAR 

New mercies, new blessings, new light 

on the way; 
New courage, new hopes, and new 

strength for each day. 
New notes of thanksgiving, new chords 

of delight; 
New songs in the morning, new songs 

in the night. 
New stars for thy crown, new tokens 

of love; 

New gleams of the glory that awaits 

thee above. 
New lights of His countenance, radiant 

and clear — 
All this be the joy of the happy New 

Year. — Exchange. 



"THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT." 

"Mr. Conductor," said little Louis 
Rhodes, pulling at a guilt-buttoned 
sleeve, "please tell me a story." 

"Bless my life!" exclaimed Captain 
Sam, of Express No. 55. The train 
had just pulled out from Newcastle, 
and, as there was a long run without 
a stop, the tired conductor had drop- 
ped into a back seat to rest a bit when 
Louis came up and asked for a story. 

"Bless my life!" said Captain Sam. 
"I don't know a story to my name, ex- 
cept 'Here is the house that Jack 
built.' " 

"Don't tell me that," answered the 
little boy. "I know that myself," and 
he began to rattle off: " 'This is tht 
house that Jack built; this is the rat 
that lived in the house that Jack built; 
this is the cat that caught the rat' " — 

"Stop right there!" said the conduc- 
tor. "That reminds me of something. 
On my last trip east, as I went through 
one of the coaches to look at tickets, 
I found a little girl about your size sit- 
ting by herself. 'Tickets,' I said, with- 
out thinking. 'Mamma has 'em,' she 
said, 'an' she's gone to get a d'ink of 
water. But won't you please take my 
orange to that little girl back there 
with the red handkerchief on her head? 
Her mamma has forgot to give her 
any.' I looked for the girl with tht. 
red handkerchief, and saw a poor wo- 
man with five cuiildren. They didn't 
have on many clothes. They didn't 
look as if they had had much to eat, 
but nobody was paying any attention 
to them. 'Maybe your mamma won't 
like you to give away your orange,' I 
said. The little girl opened her eyes 
very wide and said: 'Why; Cap'n, my 
mamma loves me to give things!' 'All 
right,' said I, and I went back to the 
little party and gave the orange; and 
I said in a loud tone of voice: 'This 
is from a little girl whose mamma just 
loves her to give things.' At that ever 
so many mothers pricked up their ears, 
and presently I saw another little girl 
bring a box of lunch to the poor chil- 
dren. 'Ah,' said I to myself, 'this is 
like that old song about the house that 
Jack J?p.ilt. This is the cat'— When 
I got that far a lady pulled a pretty 
little cap out of her bag, and said: 
'Won't you let your little girl wear this 
tamo'-shanter?' 1 1 went on singing 
easy to myself: 'Where is the dog 
that worried the cat that killed the rat 
that lived in the house that Jack 
built?' And, sure enough, here was a 



boy giving something out of his pocket, 
I don't know what. So it went on till 
those forlorn little chicks had more 
things than a few, all because one little 
kind heart gave 'em her orange. Now, 
small boy, get off cf my knee. I've got 
to ring the bell for the engineer to 
whistle. Go and see if you can't start 
another 'house that Jack built.' " 
— Exchange. 



GETTING THE HARNESS 

The teacher of a girl's Sunday 
school class in Chicago — a class of 
seventy, who take great interest in 
missions, home and foreign — tells 
about sending a missionary box to 
Utah. It was a Christmas box, and 
they expected to spend fifteen dollars 
or so on it; but after they had raised 
that much by three weeks of self-denial 
the missionary's wife sent them an 
extra list, asking for a half-worn over- 
coat and a pair of gloves for her hus- 
band and a second-hand harness for 
the old horse he drove round the mis 
sionary district to his various preach- 
ing places. There were ninety chil- 
dren in the missionary school to begin 
with, so it can be seen that the fifteen 
dollars looked inadequate, to say the 
least, to accomplish the whole box. 
The harness especially was the crux of 
the situation. None of the girls' fam- 
ilies had such a thing. It looked as 
if it were impossible. But on the day 
the box was packed — and it was a 
good box, too, with the overcoat and 
gloves and two gifts for each child! — 
a girl came walking in with her broth- 
er in tow, carrying a harness in tri- 
umph. 

"Where did you get it?" came in 
chorus from everybody. 

"0," cried the girl, 'Iknew a man who 
bad some harness. I talked to him 
three days about it, and he gave it 
to me!" 

No wonder that class packed a gooo 
box. No wonder the man who gave the 
harness became interested in missions. 
Enthusiasm is contagious. That is 
nature. Whether the thing to be ob- 
tained be a harness, a new church, or 
a new Church member, enthusiasm and 
perseverance will do it; that is the 
combination that never fails of results. 
— Forward. 



A LITTLE GENTLEMAN 

A small boy was at a table where 
his mother was not near to take care 
of him, and a lady next to him volun- 
teered her services. 

"Let me cut your steak for you," 
she said — "if I can cut it the way you 
like it," she added, with some degree 
of doubt. 

"Thank you," the boy responded, 
accepting her courtesy. "I should like 
it even if you do not cut it the way I 
like it." — Exchange. 



GOD WOULD KNOW 

Annie and Lily were going home 
from school together one afternoon 
and Annie was teasing Lily to go off 
somewhere and play with her. 

"But mother told me to come right 
home from school," said Lily. 

"Well, she has gone away, and would 
never know," replied Annie. 

"But God has not gone away; Ht, 
would know," replied Lily. — Exchange. 



A HAPPY NEW YEAR! 

From Oregon to Texas, from Florida 
to Maine, 

The pleasant New Year's greetings are 

flying like the birds; 

And if we can remember 

All their meaning till December, 
We shall fill the days with kindly deeds 

and loving, thoughtful words. 

— Youth's Companion. 



THE AIR PLANT 

A surveying party in Florida was 
resting at noon in a forest, when one 
of the men exclaimed: "I would give 
fifty cents a swallow for all the fresh 
cold water I could drink." 

He expressed the sentiment of the 
others. All were very thirsty and there 
was not a spring or stream anywhere 
near. 

While the men were talking the sur- 
veyor saw a crow put his bill into a 
cluster of broad, low leaves growing, 
on the side of a tall cypress. The 
leaves were those of a peculiar air 
plant. They were green and bulged 
but at the bottom, forming an inverted 
bell. The smaller end was held to the 
tree by roots grappling the bark. 
Feeding on the air and water that it 
catches and holds the air plant be- 
comes a sort of cistern. 

The surveyor quickly sprang to his 
feet with a laugh. "Boys," he said, 
"that old crow is wiser than we. He 
knows that there are a hundred thou- 
sand water tanks in this forest." 

"Where?" they cried. 

The surveyor cut an air plant in 
two and drained nearly a pint of pure, 
cold water from it. The men did not 
suffer for water after that, for every 
tree in the forest has at least one air 
plant, and almost every air plant con- 
tained a generous drink of water. — ■ 
Exchange. 



MAGGIE'S OWN SECRET 

Mr. and Mrs. Squeaky were twc 
little gray mice. They lived away 
lack in a corner of a great, big, empty 
box in the cellar. 

One morning Mr. Squeaky went up 
the cellar stairs on tiptoe to hunt for 
some bread and cheese in the kitchen. 

All at once he heard someone talk- 
ing, and he hid behind the broom and 
was as still as he could be. 

It was the little boy Johnnie who 
lived up stairs. He had a big hammei 
and a saw in his hand, and he was 
talking to his little sister. 

"I think that big empty box down 
cellar would make a fine doll's house, 
Maggie. I can fix a little porch on it 
and make an upstairs and a down 
stairs," the little boy said. 

"O Johnnie, that will be lovely," his 
little sister said. "I'll do something 
c or you some time. Maybe — maybe — 
I'll draw a whole slate full of elephants 
for you to look at!" 

Then they started down the cellar 
steps. 

Mr. Squeaky was so frightened that 
he almost tumbled down the stairs. 

"O, my dear," he whispered, they 
are going to break up our house with 
a big hammer and a saw, and make a 
doll's house out of it! Let's run as 
fast as we can!" 

Poor little Mrs. Squeaky began to 
cry. 

"Where shall we go," she whispered 
"O, I am so afraid, and there are al- 
ways those dreadful traps around to 
catch us!" 

But they ran as fast as they could 
to the darkest corner. Mrs. Squeaky'? 
sharp little eyes saw a hole, and she 
ran into it, and Mr. Squeaky squeezed 
in after her. 

Now where do you think they found 
themselves? Right inside of an old 
shoe! The hole they came through 
was just a hole in the shoe and made 
a nice little door. And there was 
another hole a little higher up that 
made a nice little window to peep out 
of. 

"Why, this is the dearest little house 
so cozy and warm," Mrs. Squeaky 
said. "Nobody will ever find us here, 
I know." 

After they lived there a whole fam- 
ily of little pink baby mice came to 
live with them. The papa mouse and 
the mamma mouse were so proud and 
so glad, they got little bits of cotton 
and soft paper and rags and made the 
nicest little beds you ever saw. 

The little pink baby mice could only 
say "Squeak! squeak" and cuddle up 



under the warm covers, but Mr. and 
Mrs. Squeaky laughed, and thought 
they were the smartest babies in the 
whole world. 

"Why, I feel like the old woman 
who lived in the shoe and had so 
many children she didn't know what 
to do," Mrs. Squeaky said one day. 
She was sitting by the little window 
rocking the baby mouse and taking a, 
little rest. 

Mr. Squeaky had gone out to hunt 
for some supper, and the four other 
little mice were peeping out of the 
little hole in the toe of their shoe 
house, for papa to come home. 

All at once Maggie, the little girl 
who lived upstairs, ran into the dark 
corner to hide from Johnnie, just for 
fun. And what do you think she saw? 

The four little mice peeping out of 
the door, and the poor, frightened 
mamma mouse and the little baby at 
the window. 

Maggie stopped just a minute to 
whisper gently to little gray Mrs. 
Squeaky, "Don't be frightened, little 
old woman who lives in the shoe. I'll 
never, never tell anybody where you 
live. No, I won't even tell Johnnie or 
my kitty. They might try to catch 
you. It shall be my very own secret 
— and ours!" 

So nobody but little Maggie ever 
knew about Mr. and Mrs. Squeaky, 
and their little pink babies in the old 
shoe — until long afterwards, when she 
told me the story as I have told it to 
vou.— Sara Josephine Albright, in St. 
Nichols. 



Two little girls were playing togeth- 
er and fell to quarreling. One of them 
had snappy black eyes and the other 
had twinkly blue ones. 

All at once the one with twinkly 
eyes stopped and said in the funniest 
way, "Essie, I'm sorry you were 
eross!" 

Then the one with snappy eyes 
'aughed and said, "And I'm sorry you 

vere!" 

And that was the end of the quar- 
rel.— The Child's Hour. 



OUR DAILY LIFE 

Our daily companionship with Him 
should be the saving power of all our 
'iving. We should begin the day In 
irayer with him. It will strengthen 
us for the day's tasks and temptations. 
We should every morning read a few of 
lis words. They will go with us. 
sweetening all the day and making 
L ender and compassionate our hearts 
Reside setting the tone of all our 
transactions. Above all, true compan- 
ionship is to look at all men and all 
-iroblems through the eyes, to take 
his attitude toward life. This is to 
have the mind of Christ. Christ is 
manifested to the world not through 
sermons but by the daily witness in 
->ur lives. When Christians are all 
Christlike there may be more reproach 
of Christianity by the world. The 
world may not accept him, but it 
will know him as he is. Perhaps when 
he is thus shown forth he may draw 
ill men to him. The world's idea of 
Christ is largely formed from the lives 
if his disciples. — From the Congrega- 
ionalist. 



JUST HALF IN BED 

Clyde, Ky. — Mrs. I. A. Decker, writes 
from Clyde: "I recommend Cardui 
the woman's tonic, to any woman in 
need of a remedy. For five years, I 
was unable to do my own work. Half 
my time was spent In bed. At last I 
tried Cardui. Now I am well and hap- 
py, and can do my own work." Don't 
suffer pain, headache, backache and 
other womanly miseries, when your 
own druggist has on his shelf a meme- 
dy for such troubles — Cardui. Get a 
bottle for your shelf. As a great tonic 
for weak women, nothing has been 
found for 50 years that would take its 
place. Try it. It will help you. 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 4, 1912 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON I— JAN- 
UARY 7, 1912 



J& 1 he Birth of John the Baptist Fore- 
told. Luke 1:5-23 



Golden Text — Without faith it is im- 
possible to be well pleasing unto him. 
Heb. 11:6. 



A Home of Lonely Piety 

Zacharias and his wife came of 
pious, priestly stock. The families to 
which they belonged had been experts 
in the observance of religion for many 
an age, but more than this Zaeharia& 
and his wife were characterized by 
personal piety. The great things 
which they received by inheritance 
and heredity they made their own In 
deep appreciation and loyalty. It was 
a godly household, in which religion 
and worship were the great facts of 
life. 

But there were no children in the 
home. The walls had never echoed 
with the ring of childish mirth or the 
prattle of childish voices. All the 
sweet transfiguration of mature life 
through ministry to the needs of lit- 
tle children was lacking here. It was 
a home of stern dignity and nobly 
righteous purpose, but there was a 
heartache in it, for Zacharias had the 
heart of a father and Elisabeth had 
the heart of a mother, and yet there 
was no child. 

The two went on their lonely ear- 
nest way, filling their minds and 
hearts the more with the thought ot 
Jehovah and his righteous purposes, 
since their own desire was unrealized. 
They did not know that all this dis- 
cipline of disappointment was but pre- 
paring their home more perfectly for 
the coming of one of the chosen chil- 
dren of the world. The thought of 
this home of sincere and faithful piety 
is full of stimulus and inspiration. 
Such homes are the moral and relig- 
ious bulwarks of the world. What 
lpgislation fails to accomplish a home 
of noble earnestness can achieve. The 
moral atmosphere of a household is a 
matter of the most critical signifi- 
cance. It is something created by 
the man and woman who set about 
making the home. It is made up of 
purposes half articulate, of glances of 
the eye, o ftones of speech, of words 
and of deeds. It may be full of good- 
ness. It may be saturated with evil. 
In the home of Zacharias one found 
the shining of the light of God. 

The Supreme Hour 

The great moment in a priest's life 
came when he burned incense in the 
temple of the Lord. Only once in 
his priestly career did a man go alone 
into the temple to offer incense on 
the golden altar. This great exper- 
ience, long looked forward to, had 
come to Zacharias. With trembling 
reverence he went about his task, the 
sense of the nearness of God and the 
sacredness of his work full upon him. 
Suddenly a wonderful thing happen- 
ed. The priest was not alone. A 
bright angel stood beside him. Now 
fear filled Zacharias and he stood in 
a tremor of strange alarm. A gentle, 
reassuring voice fell on his ear. He 
was bidden to have no fear. The an- 
gel had not come as a messenger of 
doom, but as a messenger of joy. The 
cry of ^is lonely heart had been heard 
and God would give him a son. His 
wife Elisabeth would become a moth- 
er, and when the child was born it 
was to be called John. 

Zacharias had entered the templb 
to meet his life's great experience. He 
had met it indeed, but in a more won- 
derful sense than that which he toad 
anticipated. The vision and the 
promise seemed too good to be true. 



Life has a way of moving on in 
quiet rounds of steady activity. One 
year seems much like another and we 
fancy that it will be so to the end. 
Then comes a great hour, flashing out 
of the sky, full of meaning and full 
of destiny. Life is not a mere round 
of dull monotony after all. There 
have come the angelic voice and the 
angelic promise, but the years of pa- 
tient faithfulness lead to the great 
hour. If Zacharias and Elisabeth had 
not been building their home into full- 
er and more zealous piety year by 
year they could not have been trusted 
with John the Baptist. The hours of 
dull and earnest work bring the hours 
when angel voices and golden words 
ring on the ear. 

The Work of John 
It was not merely that Zacharias 
was to have a son. This son was to 
~ie a great messenger of Jehovah. He 
was to live the life of one set apart 
in a peculiar fashion for the service 
of God. His words were to break in- 
to the sluggishness of men's hearts 
and rouse them. He was to turn the 
^vil from evil ways. He was to turn 
the foolish from ways of folly. He 
was to be a reconciler of human dif- 
ferences through the triumph of a 
noble spirit. He was to prepare for 
the Lord the people who were not 
>*eady for any great and decisive reve- 
ation of God to men. The highest 
things in Israel's past were to cry out 
in the voice of John. The deepest de- 
sires of pious hearts were to be made 
articulate in his speech. The will of 
God was to be announced in his com- 
manding preaching. Once more a 
irophet was to speak to the people of 
Tehovah. 

All this represents a program not 
only for John, but for the herald of 
"ighteousness in every age. There are 
^reat words which need to be spoken 
in every country and in every time. 
There are noble memories which 
should be kept calling in men's ears. 
There are moral demands which 
should be hurled into the consciences 
of sluggish men. There is the fact of 
God to be made real and vivid to 
people inclined to forget Him. For 
-<,11 this a man is needed out of whose 
Ufe can come speech that summons 
and stings and burns. How shall such 
a man be found? 

When God wanted such a man He 
first sought out a home of deep ana 
mastering piety; He first sought out 
a man and a woman who could be 
trusted to train up the one who one 
day was to speak a great word. The 
Christian home is the cradle of Chris- 
tian leaders. When its altars are 
kept burning brightly and the chil- 
dren grow up familiar with the sweet 
seriousness of the Christian life, we 
may expect voices of spiritual power 
to ring commandingly over the lano.. 

The Speechless Priest 

Zacharias was a good man, but he 
still had battles to fight and wrong 
tendencies to correct and lessons to 
learn. Some unmastered spirit of 
doubt rose within him as he heard 
the words of the angel and he said: 
"Whereby shall I know this?" With 
signs and wonders flashing about him 
he asked for a sign. Some latent lack 
of complete responsiveness to the 
spiritual rose to the surface of his 
life and thus expressed itself. The 
heart of Zacharias was wholesome and 
devoted, but there was an unsound 
spot and it must receive treatment. 
The very hour of his highest spiritual 
privilege was the hour when a per- 
sonal weakness revealed itself. With 
a sort of noble irony the angel grant- 
ed the request of Zacharias. He should 
have a sign, and a very unmistaka- 
ble sign it was to be. He should be 
unable to speak until the child, fore- 
told by the angel, was born, and every 
time toe wanted to speak his tongue 
ue and lips refused to answer to his 
command, he would feel what aston- 
ishingly concrete things God would do 
and thus his doubt would vanish and 
his faith would grow. 



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It is often true that a good man has 
some moral lack in his life, because 
of which God sends to him a quick 
and vigorous discipline. It is all 
done in kindness. The months of 
speechlessness performed a great min- 
istry in Zacharias's life. When he 
did speak again he uttered such words 
as he had never spoken or had the 
power to conceive in all his life before. 
The discipline which comes like a sur- 
geon's knife to some unnoticed weak- 
ness, is one of the real expressions of 
the love of God. — New York Christian 
Advocate. 

Years of Suffering 

Catarrh and Blood Disease — 
Doctors Failed to Cure. 

Miss Mabel F. Dawkins, 1214 Lafay- 
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"For three years 1 was troubled with 
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medicine and was as well and strong 
as ever. I feel like a different person 
and recommend Hood's to any one suf- 
fering from catarrh." 

Get it today in usual liquid form or 
chocolated tablets called Sarsatabs. 



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/ 



.January 4, 1912 



There are some people who want 
ti.e best of everything. These 
ere the people who bu/ the 

ARTISTIC STIEFF 



Our special sale on Player Pianos is 
attracting much attention as 
well as _>u Grand Pianos 

The prices made on these instru- 
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the p.c ent #tock 

You had better take advantage of 
these bargains before the 
sicck is ->.l a tted 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the Artistic Stieff, 
Shaw and 3tieff Self-Player Pianos 

Southern Wareroom 
S West Trade St., Charlotte, N. C. 
C. H. Wilmoth, Manager 
Mention this Paptr 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SECRETARY'S 
REGISTER 



The best record book on the 
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and one section of 8 pages. 

Each one of the 28-page sec- 
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two pages for each of the thir- 
teen Sundays, and two for the 
Quarterly Report. Each report 
consists of two pages, one for 
statistical report, one for finan- 
cial. These are facing pages. 

The 8-page section, which 
comes last, has two facing pages 
for yearly report, statistical and 
financial; the remainder is de- 
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The two-year book consists of 
two one-year books In one bind- 
ing. 

PRICES : 
One Year Book - - $1.00 
Two Year Book - - 1-50 
POSTPAID 

^he jldvocate 'Press 

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Epworth League 



Editor of League Columns 

Miss Blanche Johnson 
435 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 



LESSONS FOR THE JUNIOR 
LEAGUE 

(Continued from last week.) 
By Walter W. Neal, Supt, Junior 
Epworth I eague, Holston Con- 
ference. 

NEW TESTAMENT 

1. How many books in tne New 
Testament? 

Twenty-seven books. 

2. Name the divisions of the New 
Testament. 

Historical, Pauline Epistles, Gener- 
al Epistles and Prophetical book. 

3. Give the number of historical 
books. 

Five. 

4. Name the historical books.... 
Mathew, Mark, Luke, John and the 

Acts. 

5. What do these gooks teach us? 
The life of Christ on earth and the 

acts of His Apostles. 

6. Give the number of Pauline 
Epistles. 

Fourteen. 

7. Name the Pauline Epistles. 

Romans, I. Corinthians, II. Corinth- 
ians, Galations, Ephesians, Phillipians, 
Colossians, I. Thessalonians, II. Thes- 
salonians, I. Timothy, II. Timothy, 
Titus, Philomen, Hebrews. 

8. Who is the author of these Epis- 
tles? 

Paul. 

9. Give the number of the Gener- 
al Epistles. 

Seven books. 

10. Name the General Epistles. 
James, I. Peter, II. Peter, I. John, 

II. John, III. John, Jude. 

11. What do these Epistles teach 
us? 

How to live for Christ. 

12. Give the number of Prophetical 
books. 

One. 

13. Who wrote the book? 
John the Apostle. 

14. Bound the following books: Ex- 
odus, Psalms, Luke. 

Exodus is the second book in the 
Old Testament. It is preceded by 
Genesis, followed by Leviticus. It 
was written by Moses; it contains 40 
chapters; the characteristic word is 
blod, giving the thought of our re- 
demption. 

Psalms is the nineteenth book in 
the Old Testament. It is preceded by 
Job, followed by Proverbs: David was 
the principal writer. It contains 150 
chapters. 

Luke is the third book in the New 
Testament. It is preceded by Mark, 
followed by John. It was written by 
Luke and contains 24 chapters. 

15. Name the books of the Bible. 
(For lessons to memorize use the 

Beatitudes, Matthew 5:1-12; Psalms, 
2nd and 23.) 



OUR VOWS AND PRIVILEGES 

1. Who may become members of 
the M. E. Church, South? 

Those who will (1) abstain from 
all evil, (2) constantly believe God's 
Holy Word, (3) do good of every kind, 
and (4) attend upon all the ordi- 
nances of God. 

2. What is meant by the pledge to 
abstain from evil? 

(1) to resist the devil and all his> 
tempting wiles, avoiding the things 
that have in them the least appear- 
ance of evil. 

(2) to resist the pomp and show of 
the world, and not to be so taken up 
with these as to forget our religious 
duties. 

(3) to control the appetites of the 
flesh, so that they may not bring us 
into sin. Our bodies and worldly pos- 



sessions as well as our souls are to be 
subject to the will of Christ. 

3. What is the only form of Creed 
to which you subscribe in becoming 
a Methodist? 

I believe in God the Father Al- 
mighty, Maker of heaven and earth; 
and in Jesus Christ, His only begot- 
ten Son our Lord, who was conceived 
by the Holy Ghost, born of the virgin 
Mary; suffered under Pontius Pilate, 
was crucified, dead, and buried; he 
rose again the third day; he ascended 
into heaven, and sitteth at the right 
hand of God the Father Almighty, 
and from thence shall come again to 
judge the quick and the dead; I be- 
lieve in the Holy Ghost, the Church 
of God, the communion of Saints, the 
remission of sins, the resurrection of 
the body, and everlasting life after 
death. 

5. What other promise mus t be 
given before baptism? 

To obiediently keep God's holy will 
and commandments, and walk by this 
rule all our days. 

6. Must you promise to be subject 
to the discipline of the church? 

Yes. 

7. What is implied by this? 
Obedience to its government. 

8. Can a church exist without some 
form of government? 

No; that would be anarchy. There 
must be order in every organization. 

9. What are the ordinances of the 
church that you promise to attend 
upon? 

(1) The public worship of God. 

(2) The preaching and reading ot 
the word. 

(3) The supper of the Lord. 

(4) Family and private worship. 

(5) Searching the Scripture. 

(6) Fasting or Abstinence. 

10. How often should Methodists 
observe a fast day? 

Once a quarter, on Friday before the 
Quarterly Meeting. 

11. What are some of the institu- 
tions of the church? 

The ministry, missions and other 
benevolent enterprises. 

12. Why must we agree to support 
these? 

Because they are necessary to the 
life and growth of the church. 

13. What is . the church? 

The church is God's agency for con- 
verting the world. 

14. What has the church done for 
us? 

It has brought us the benefits of 
tbe gospel, and we should show out 
gratitude. (Here name some benefits 
of the Gospel.) 

15. Does our church require any 
fixed sum from each member? 

No. The offerings are entirely vol- 
untary. 

16. What do you think is the small- 
est amount a Christian ought to give 
to the Lord's work. 

One-tenth of all his income should 
be the least offering. 

Note: The teacher should explain 
more in detail these answers; all the 
children should be made to fully com- 
prehend these solemn obligations. 



CHURCH GOVERNMENT 

1. What is the meaning of Con- 
ference in Methodist government? 

A formal meeting of ministers and 
members to do church business. 

2. What are similar meetings in 
other churches called? 

Assemblies, conventions and coun- 
cils. 

3. How many kinds of Conferences 
are there? 

Five Conferences. 

4. Name the Conferences. 

The General, Annual, District, Quar- 
terly, and Chruch Conferences. 



GENERAL CONFERENCE 

1. What is the highest Conference? 
The General Conference. 

2. How often does it meet? 
Once every four years. 

3. What are the powers of this 
body. 



It has full power to make the laws 
for the church. 

4. Who compose the General Con- 
ference? 

The bishops and ministerial and 
lay delegates, elected by the several 
Annual Conferences. 

5. How long does a session of Gen- 
eral Conference last? 

About four weeks. 

6. Who presides at the General Con- 
ference? 

One of the bishops. 

7. Where and when was the first 
session held? 

Baltimore, Dec. 1784. It is com- 
monly known as the Christmas Con- 
ference. 

8. What church was organized by 
this conference? 

'The Methodist Episcopal Church. 

9. What led to the delegated form 
of the General Conference? 

As the church grew, it became in- 
convenient and costly for all the min- 
isters to meet in one place. 

10. Where and when was the last 
General Conference held? 

(To be supplied.) 

(Continued next week) 



THE SIN OF FRETTING 

When I see a woman with thf.t 
beautiful countenance which won the 
heart of her husband darkened by a 
frown, constantly fretting and mak- 
ing all about her uncomfortable be- 
cause there will be "dirt" somewhere, 
the maid servent is slow, and does not 
understand herbusiness; baby is cross, 
always Grossest when much is to be 
done; children unreasonable, and so 
on — I am tempted to exclaim: "Hush, 
dear woman, these useless repinings: 
Examine yourself; perchance the 
blame lies at your- own door, after all." 

There is a talisman possessing a 
magic charm which will scatter all 
these evils. It is cheerfulness. The 
maid servant has quickened and im- 
proved by kind, encouraging words. 
The very cast of your countenance, the 
tone of your voice, has its effect on 
your little ones. Then let your hub- 
band see that instead of a fretter his 
wife is gentle, kind, self-denying,shed- 
ding peace and happiness around his 
heart, and brighten his home by the 
sunlight of her smiles. A man of sense 
is not slow in discovering the gentler 
virtues of his wife. The secret of her 
influence over him lies here. It Is the 
mystic tie binding him to her, which 
naught but death itself hath power to 
sever. — United Presbyterian. 



A boy reading the verse, "An dthose 
who live in cottages are happier than 
those who sit on thrones," startled 
the crowd by reading thus: "And 
those who live in cottages are happier 
than those who sit on thorns." 



Two-year-old Harry had never seen 
a live lamb, his only knowledge fo 
that animal being derived from a toy 
one on wheels. While visiting grand- 
pa on the farm, he was taken to the 
sheep pen to see the lambs. After 
looking at them for a few minutes, he 
looked up at grandpa with a puzzled 
expression, and asked: "Where's the 
wheels?" 



HELPLESS AS A BABY 

Valley Heights, Va. — Mrs. Jennie B. 
Kirby, in a letter from this place says: 
"I was sick in bed for nine months, 
with womanly troubles. I was so 
weak and helpless, at times, that I 
could not raise my head off the pil- 
low. I commenced to take Cardui ana 
saw it was helping me, at once. Now, 
I can work all day." As a tonic, for 
weak women, nothing has been found, 
for fifty years, that would take the 
place of Cardui. It will surely do you 
good. Cardui is prepared from vege- 
table ingredients, and has a specific 
curative effect on the womanly organs. 
Try a bottle today. At your drug- 
gist's. 



Paga Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 4, 1912 



Farm and Garden 



WINTER GARDEN NOTES 



W. F. Massey in Progressive Farmei. 

I am trying some cauuage plants 
yn the Georgia Station method, o> 
iftetting tnem in open turrows. Thej 
Hound, at tne Georgia Station tna.. 
there was less loss in tne. open turVowa 
than on eitner side of tne riages, 
though they lound, too, that tneit. 
was less on the north side than ou 
the south side, as 1 have tound. 

* * .* * 

1 set lettuce plants last year in open 
furrows and they wintered well, uy. 
the spring weather turned oft so ho. 
early that the plants bolted to seeu 
without heading well. Under norma, 
spring conditions they would havt 
headed in late April. 

I have now Black-Seeded Big Bos- 
ton and the Improved Big Boston let- 
tuce in trames under glass sashes, 
thin them to ten inches, tor early cut 
daily. 

In other frames I will not sow seea 
in rows 8 inches apart, and will thin 
them to 10 inches, tor early spring 
heading. These are under douuit 
glazed sashes that keep out all frost. 
In another frame I will sow earl} 
in Decemoer under the double sashes 
seed of early radishes and beets in 
alternative rows 6 inches apart. The 
radishes will come out early and tne 
beets will then have a foot between 
the rows and will come off in March 
and April. 

* * * * 

Just now we have a fine substitute 
for green onions, in the leeks. The 
seed for these were sown in May ana 
the plants transplanted in July. They 
are good but would have been much 
larger had the rains come -earlier in 
summer. The rows have been earth- 
a -ed up somewhat after the manner oi 
celery to give longer white stems, ana 
from now until the green onions are 
ready they come in very acceptably. 

* * * * 

The onions planted from sets in 
September are now a foot tall ana 
will give- us green onions in the earl} 
spring, the date depending on the win- 
ter weather. Last winter we were 
eating green onions in late February. 

* * * * 

Then we are now getting plentiful 
supplies of spinach and kale, and as 
I have before said, we get something 
fresh from the garden every day ic 
the year, and the ground is kept so 
clean of weeds that there is no harboi 
for the cutworm moths to lay theii 
eggs, and we are not bothered by cut- 
worms as those who let their gardens 
run to weeds in the fall always are. 
A garden in the south should be a per 
petual feast and can easily be made so 
by a. little attention. 



A YOUNG LADY'S CORN CROP 

This year, just to see what I could 
do, I planted my first crop of corn, 
one and one-fourth acres. Being a 
young lady, I was afraid that people 
would laugh at me should I make a 
failure, so for months before the land 
was planted I studied your paper care- 
fully and read every article I could 
find on corn culture. 

My land was seeded down last fall 
in crimson clover, but failed to catch 
a stand, so with no green crop to 
turn under I had to resort to manure 
and fertilizer alone. It was plowed 
ten inches deep, and owing to the shal- 
low cultivation it received, the contin- 
ued dry weather injured the corn very 
little. 

My yield, as weighed and measured 
by Mr. Frank Newell, the demonstra- 
tion agent for this county, was 71 
bushels — not a record-breaker by any 
means, but I am proud of my first 
attempt and hope to do better next 
year. 



This little venture in farming has 
been beneficial to me in many ways. 
I really believe, from the time it was 
planted until it was stored in the crib, 
I got fifty dollars' worth of pleasure 
out of my "corn patch." Oh, the joy 
of seeing that corn grow! And now I 
can fully appreciate with Riley, "When 
the fodder's in the shock." Financial- 
ly, the fodder, shucks and five bushels 
of corn will pay all expenses and I 
nave shared 66 bushels of corn at one 
dollar a bushel. Have you among 
your readers many experienced farm 
rs who will clear $66 on one and a 
4uarter acres of cotton this year? 
Miss Lucy T. Webb, in Progressive 
Farmer. 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 



Entered according te the Postal Laws 
and Regulations la tke M i htw la 
Greensboro, N. C, *■ mall pattter ef 
the aecend claaa. 



STARTING A HOG FARM 

A South Carolina reader says he 
aas 100 acres of land that will grow 
a third of a bale of cotton per acre 
on which he wishes to graze the pro- 
duce of three sows, which he estimates 
will raise 20 pigs, spring and fall. His 
plan is to put 5 acres in parmanent 
pasture and divide the balance in b 
one-acre lots. 

His questions are, (1) will this lana 
jraze this number of pigs and the 
iows, and (2) what crop should he 
plant? He says he will use about a 
on of fertilizer on the land and feed 
ome corn in connection with the graz- 
ing crops. 

1. Will this land graze this number 
of pigs? Yes, it should do so, if from 
a fourth to a half ration of concen- 
trates such as corn is fed. His esti- 
mate of raising 40 pigs a year from 
three sows is rather high, but may bt 
done. One litter of pigs will be eight 
months old before the next litter is 
weaned and if the pigs are marketed 
at from 10 to 12 months of age there 
will only be from two to four months 
in each year that he will have the 
maximum of 40 pigs on hand and halt 
of them will be small. 

Of course, the quality of the land, 
the crops sowed, the seasons and the 
amount of concentrates or corn feed, 
will determine the number of hogs 
ior which the land will furnish graz- 
ing. 

2. For the permanent pasture we 
suggest Bermuda, and bur clover, 
with white clover and other legumes 
if they will grow. The Bermuda ana 
our clover should be allowed to get 
well set and to a good stand before 
they are grazed at all closely. 

"This land that will only make a 
third of a bale of cotton per acre' 
will not furnish large crops, and in 
South Carolina alfalfa and red clover 
a.re probably not to be grown on such 
Land. For the five lots we suggest 
the following: 

I Lot 1. Oats or rape sowed early in 
the fall; followed by spring rape, fol 
lowed by soy beans. 

Lot 2. Oats, wheat or barley in 
the fall, followed by soy beans or pea- 
nuts in the spring. 

Lot 3. Rape or some of the cereals 
in the fall, followed by spring rape, 
and by peas or soy beans in the sum- 
mer. 

Lot 4. Rape or some of the cereals 
in the fall, followed by soy beans oi 
peanuts in the spring. 
: Lot 5. Some of the cereals or rape 
in the fall, followed by peanuts or 
soy beans in the spring. 
I On such land as described, rape and 
wheat and barley are not likely to do 
well enough to furnish much grazing; 
therefore oats are probably the best 
for the fall sowing unless the land has 
increased in fertility under the rota- 
tion and liberal fertilization, as it 
surely will. After the land Is made 
more fertile then rape and wheat and 
barley will give more and better graz- 
ing than oats. 

We advise the use of fertilizers on 
permanent pasture also, until it has 
become more productive under pas- 
turage and this fertilization. If this 
is done, perhaps a ton and a half or 
two tons of commercial fertilizers 
should be used for a year or two, in- 
stead of only one ton. — Ex. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

On* ysar SI. I* 

91s monttaa Tl 

Te all preacher* af the Ooaaal at ll.M 

per year. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION (Inc.) 

D. B. Colt rune, President Caaeerd 

Rev. J. R. Scrosaa, Y.-Praa Charlett* 

NT. L. Sure, Secretary Oreensbere 

>V. O. Bradchaw High P»lot 

r. C. Hoyle Oreeaabare 



SALISBURY DISTRICT 

J. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder 
Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 
Saliebury Circuit, Mt. Tabor, Jan. 6, 

Spencer Station, night Jan. 7, 

Bethel— Big Lick, Bethel Jan. 13, 

Concord, Central Jan. 14, 

Concord Circuit, Olivet Jan. 20, 

Concord, Forest Hill Jan. 21, 

Weodleaf Circuit, Woodleaf .. Jan. 27, 
Mount Pleasant, at Mount Pleasant, 

Feb. 3, 

Salem Feb. 10, 

New London, at New London, Feb. 17, 




ASHEVILLE DISTRICT 
D. Atkins, Presiding Elder 

Weavervllle, N. C. 

Mlcaville, Shoal Creek Jan. 6, 7 

Burnsville Jan. 7 

:iltmore and Mt. Pleasant.. Jan. 13, 14 

Bethel Jan. 14 

Mars Hill, Beech Glen Jan. 20, 21 

Marshall, Marshall Jan. 27, 28 

Hot Springs, Jan. 2S, 29 

Central Feb. 4 

Haywood Feb. 4 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 
J. R. Scroggs, Presiding El ler 
Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

Weddlngton, Weddlngton Jan. 6 

vVaxhaw, Waxhaw Jan. 7, 8 

viorven, Bethel Jan. 13, 14 

\Vadesboro, Wadesboro Jan. 14, 15 

Prospect, Bethlehem Jan. 20 

Monroe, Central Jan. 21 

Monroe, N. Monroe Jan. 21 

Vnsonvllle, Ansonville Jan. 27, 28 

Ulesvllle, Lilesville Jan. 28, 29 

Marshvllle, Marshville Feb. 3, 4 

Polkton, Polkton Feb. 4, 5 

Jnlonvllle, Zion Feb. 10, 11 

Oerlta, Derlta Feb. 17 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT 
J. E. Gay, Presiding Elder 
Franklin, N. C. 
First Round 

Bryson and Whittler, at Bryson, Jan. 6, 7 
Oillsboro and Sylva Circuit, at Sylva, 

Jan. 13, 14 

Webster Circuit, at Webster, Jan. 20, 21 

Vndrews Jan. 27, 28 

ludson Circuit, at Judson .... Feb. 3, 4 
Murphy Circuit, at Roger's ..Feb. 10, 11 

Murphy Station Feb. 11, 12 

Waynesvllle Circuit, at Ledford's, 

Feb. 17, 18 

The District Stewards and the Pastors 
ire called to meet at Bryson City Thurs 
lay, January 5th, at 7:30: This meeting 
vvill continue through Friday, and Is for 
•onference and prayer. 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT 
W. R. Ware, Presiding Elder 
Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

Ramseur and Frankllnvllle, 

Frankllnville 6, 7 

Liberty Circuit, Liberty Jan. 7, 8 

Coerldge Circuit, Concord . . Jan. 13, 14 



MORGANTON DISTRICT 
R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

Old Fort, at Oreenlees ...... Jan. «, 7 

Marion, at night Jan. 12, 14 

McDowell, at Murphy's Chapel, 

Jan. IS, 14 
North Catawba, at Capernaum, 

Jan. 12, and S p. m., 14 
Bakersvllle, at Bakersville, . . Jan. 20,21 
Spruce Pine, at Mt. Vernon ..Jan. 27, 28 

Table Rock, at Oak Hill Feb. 3, 4 

Morgan ton station, at night ..Feb. 2, 4 
Morganton Circuit, at Gilboa, Feb. 10, 11 
Connelly Springs and Rutherford Col 

ege, at Harmony, Feb. 17, 18 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT 
R. M. Taylor, Presiding Elder 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

Tadklnville, Longtown Jan. 7, 

Dobson, Stony Knoll Jan. 14, 15 

Jonesville, Jonesvllle Jan. 21, 22 

Eikln Station Jan. 22, 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain, 

Jan. 28, 29 
NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 

M. H. Vestal, Presiding Elder 
North Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

Laurel Springs Circuit, Laurel Springs! 

Jan. 6, 7 

N. Wikesboro Circuit, Miller's Creek, 

Jan. IS, 14 

Wilkes Circuit, Beulah Jan. 20, 21 

North Wllkesboro Station .. Jan. 28, 29 
Wllkesboro Station Feb. 4, i 



SHELBY DISTRICT 
8. B. Turrentlne, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

Polkville, RehoBeth Jan. 6, 

Bessemer City, Bessemer City, Jan. 13, 
King's Mountain anil ElBethel, 

King's Mountain, Jan. 13, 

Belwood, Palm Tree Jan. 20, 

South Fork, Plateau Jan. 27. 



STATESVI LLE DISTRICT 
Lee T. Mann, Presiding Elder 
Lenoir, N. C. 
First Round 
West Statesvllle, Bethlehem .. Jan. «, 7 

Troutman, Troutman Jan. 7, 8 

Maiden, St. Paul Jan. 14, lb 

Newton Jan. 14, IS 

Caldwell, Hudson Jan. 20, 21 

Granite Falls Jan. 21, 22 

Lenoir Ct., South Lenoir ..Jan. 27, 28 

Lenoir Jan. 28, 29 

Whltnel, Whitnel, 3 p. m Jan. 28, 29 

Mooresvllle Ct., Falrview Feb. 3, 4 

Davidson Feb. 4, S 

Mooresvllle Feb. 11, 12 



WAYN ESVILLE DISTRICT 
L. T. Corded, Presiding Elder 
Waynesville, N. C. 
First Round 

Bethel, Spring Hill Jan. 6, 7 

Sulphur Springs, Pleasant Hill, 

Jan. 13, 14 

Spring Creek, Spring Creek, Jan. 20, 21 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Jan. 27, 28 

Mill River, Avery's Creek Feb. 3, 4 

Fines Creek, Fines Creek Feb. 10, 11 

Brevard Ct., Rosman Feb. 17, 18 

Brevard Station Feb. 24, 25 



WINSTON DISTRICT 
Plato Durham, Presiding Elder 
Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

Farmington, Bethlehem Jan. 6, 7 

Advance, Advance Jan. 7, 8 

Linwood, Bethel Jan. 13, 14 

Lexington Jan. 14, 15 

Davidson, Good Hope Jan. 20, 21 

Lewlsville, Sharon Jan. 27, 28 

Grace Jan. 28, 29 

Davie, Hardison Feb. 3, 4 

Mocksville Feb. 4, 5 

Cooleemee Feb. 4, 5 

Kernersvllle, Kernersville Feb. 10, 11 

Southside and Salem, Salem Feb. 11 

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kindness of writing us for a free sample. 
No medicine chest is complete without 
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Gray's Ointment. Address Dr. W. F. Gray 



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January 4, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 




RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, the Great and Supreme 
Ruler of the Univeise has, in His in 
finite wisdom, removed from this 1L 
to the life beyond our taithlul an. 
much loved friend and Sunuay SciKX 
Supt, Mr. A. L. Sharpe; and wherea 
in his dtath we nave sustained iL 
loss of a noble friend and leader c 
Troutmans, one wno was always reau 
to ihelp and sympathize with tho- 
who were in trouole or distress. Hi 
life was one of great usefulness. 

Therefore be it resolved, 1st: Tha 
in our grief and sorrow tor the loa 
of one so true, we find a consolatio. 
in the gloiious belief, that while hu 
body is sleeping in the silent grave 
his sweet spirit is with Jesus. We 
deeply sympathize with those who ai~ 
bound to him by the nearest and deai 
est ties. We siiare with them tiu 
hope of a resurrection in the beauti 
fut ceyond, wbere sad parting comu 
no more. 

Resolved 2nd: That we as a Sundaj 
School extend our sincere sympathy 
to the bereaved family in this, then 
greatest atiliction, anu commend thtL. 
to the tender care of our Heavenly 
father, who is ever ready to heal ou, 
sorrows, and hear our griefs. 

Resolved 3rd: That a copy of thest 
resolutions be sent to the North Caru 
lina Christian Advocate, a copy to the 
family, and a copy spread upon thi. 
minutes of our Sunday School. 

Rev. J. J. Edwards. 
Mrs. J. N. Johnston, 
Mattie Sherrill. 

Committee. 



AZOR M. SLOAN 



Azor Monroe Sloan, fourth son of 
J. G. and Nancy Sloan was born in 
Iredell County, N. C, July 6th, 182? 
and died at Statesville, N. C, Dec. 7th, 
1911 in the eighty-fifth year of his age. 
He was one of a family of nine broth- 
ers and six sisters, two brothers, Jere- 
miah, of Bryantsville, N. C. and Abijah 
of Missouri, and one sister, Mrs. Roo- 
ert Johnson of Oregon, survive. 

He was married to Mary J. Scroggs 
of Scotts Cross Roads, Dec. 22, 184 1, 
who died in less than a year. On Nov. 
29th, 1849, he was married to Mary 
L. White. This last union was blessed 
with five children, four of whom are 
living: W. Reese, James L.., Robert 
L. and Mrs. M. L..' Lentz. 

After forty nine years of happy 
married life Sistier Sloan died quite 
suddenly in 1898. 

Besides the four children Brother 
Sloan left 17 grand-children and 13 
great-grand-chi)dren. 

Before the war he was drummei 
boy for the Iredell Blues and met with 
them at all tjae old time musters and 
played the fife or beat the drum. On 
account of ajge and trade he was em- 
ployed in the Confederate service as 
a mechanic. After the surrender he 
returned to his little farm near Stony 
Point and lived a quiet frugal life. 

He was one of the charter members 
of Stony ;Point Methodist church and 
a Sunday school superintendent and 
steward for a long time and for over 
forty yet>rs led the singing at all the 
various services there. One of the 
most faithful members, both he and 
his good wife were beloved by all, for 
their kifndly ministries had been a 
blessing; in many a home of sorrow. 

Brother Sloan was a life-long read- 
er of tine Advocate and enjoyed its 
weekly 'visits as one who was intense 
ly interested in all th ework of the 
churcty. One of his chief delights 
even in his last days after it was very 
difficult for him to see was to peruse 
its pagfes that he might know how the 
battle ipf the Lord progressed. 

Hi)fe 'last days were days of quietness 
andy peace and when the end came he 



almly fell asleep to awake amid the 
light of a perfect day. 

Surely his life verified the promise 
that "The work of righteousness 
ihall be peace and the effect of right- 
jousness, quietness and assurance for 
jver." H. T. 

Statesville, N. C, Dec. 21, 1911. 



EAGLE 

Jospeh Eagle was born in Rowan 
iounty, December 6th, 1839, departed 
lis life July 9th, aged 71 years, 7 
lonths and 3 days. He leaves a wife, 
1 children, 62 grandchildren, 18 great 
.randchildren, and a host of other rel- 
tives and friends to mourn their loss. 
Ve feel that our loss is his eternal 
,ain. He was a true Christian man, 
i good husband, a kind father and 
teighbor. He was also a true Metho- 
list. He will be missed by our preach- 
rs. His home was always the preach- 
er's home. The church at old Liberty 
A^ill miss him in the prayer meeting. 
Sunday school and all other church 
services. Brother Eagle suffered for 
six months or more and showed pa- 
cience in the great suffering he endur- 
ed. On his dying bed he always ex- 
pressed himself as being ready and 
willing to go. Said he had nothing 
to fear as he always tried to live right 
xnd said he wanted to go home. May 
jod's blessings rest upon his dear 
•ompanion and loved ones. May they 
live so as to meet him in heaven. 

Nancy Eagle. 



IN MEMORY OF MRS. SARAH DA- 
VIDSON TATUM 

Twice death has entered our Home 
Mission band and taken away valued 
members — about four years ago that 
excellent woman, Mrs. Carrie Tatum 
eiill — and now another one is gone. 

We, as members of the Olin-Iredell 
Circuit Home Mission Auxiliary, wish 
.o express our esteem for the estima- 
ble character of Mrs. Tatum, and to 
offer this tribute of affection to her 
memory. In all the walks of life she 
oore herself with gentle Christian 
dignity. We believe our loss is her 
gain, and are glad th,at this is true, 
yet we miss her faithful ways; and 
the fragrance and beauty of her life 
linger with us yet, for she being dead 
yet speaketh. 

As we journey to the better land, 
may a remembrance of her beautiful 
Jhristlan example refresh our spirits, 
and encourage our faith. 

Mrs. Holland, 

Mrs. Gill, 

Mrs. Stikeleather. 



ACHI LEY 

Linnie Lee, infant daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel H. Achley, was born 
June 5, 1911, and died Dec. 20, 1911, 
aged 6 months and 15 days. 

The earthly remains of little Linnie 
Lee was laid to rest in the cemetery of 
Old Pisgah Church, December 21. 
Loving hands bore her to this last 
resting place, loving voices sang the 
comforting old hymn, "Nearer My God 
to Thee," but there was a vacancy in 
some hearts that could not be filled. 

Our hearts go out in the deepest 
sympathy to the bereaved parents ana 
we pray that the God of peace may 
give them the comfort that we were 
unable to give. Be comforted parents, 
for the spirit of your little one is in 
the hands of Him who loved little 
children and said, "Suffer the little 
children to come unto me, for t>f such 
is the Kingdom of Heaven." 

J. E. Womack, 
Thermal City, N. C. 



Soft words are best; true kindliness 
will lend; 
Even to a rebuke a tender glow; 
A bitter, cruel speech may cost a 
friend; 

But gentle, loving words may win a 
foe. 

— Earle William Gage. 




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Page Sixteen 




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THE WAY IT SOUNDED 

"Mamma, I'm never going to plaj 
with Amy again," said Ruth, coming 
into the sitting room with tears in hei- 
eyes. "She is too selfish for anything. 
She wants everything her own way or 
she won't play." 

"My dear, it doesn't sound very 
nice to hear you say such unkind 
things. And, besides, they are not 
true, for you will want to play with 
Amy to-morrow, I am sure. You have 
said so many times that you did not 
intend to play with her again, and the 
next day you was ready to have a 
good time with her." 

"But this time, mamma, I really 
mean it. She pulled Geraldine's hand 
off, and was just as naughty as she 
could be. I never want to play with 
her again." 

That afternoon Ruth's cousin Helen 
came to visit her, so she did not see 
Amy all the afternoon, and the next 
morning the little difficulty was still 
unsettled. Mrs. Roberts and her sister 
sat with their sewing on the porch 
near the two little girls, who were 
making clothes for their dolls, and 
Ruth had forgotten all about her quar- 
rel with Amy in the good time she 
was having. 

"This seems to be a very quiet neigh- 
borhood," said Mrs. Appleton. "Are 
there no children in it? I should 
think Ruth would be very lonely." 

"There is a little girl across the 
way," said Mrs. Roberts, "but I am 
not anxious to have Ruth play with 
her. She is so naughty and selfish 
that I am afraid Ruth will be spoiled." 

"Mamma! There's Amy out under 
the apple tree looking this way," said 
Ruth with very pink cheeks. "I'm so 
afraid she'll hear you." 

"Well, what if she does?" asked Mrs. 
Roberts easily. "Maybe it will do her 
good. Yesterday she was so naughty 
that Ruth says she never will play 
with her again. I have been thinking 
perhaps we ought to find a new home 
so we would not have — " 

"Please, don't, mamma!" cried Ruth, 
running to fling her arms about her 
mother's neck. "I see now how naugh- 
ty it sounds to be always talking about 
folks. I was badder than Amy yester- 
day, and I want to run down to the ap- 
ple tree and tell her so. May I?" 

Of course Mrs. Roberts told her to 
run and bring Amy to the porch, and 
the three little girls had a good time 
together. "Mamma, I was so 'shamed 
this morning," said Ruth at bed-time, 
"and so sorry I had said the unkind 
things about Amy. I'm going to try 
very hard to remember how things 
sound after this when I am tempted 
to be naughty. I am glad you helped 
me, but I hope you'll never have to 
again." — Hilda Richmond. 



In the Detroit Conference, Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, out of 316 ap- 
pointments made at its recent session, 
only ten were for more than the fifth 
year, the former pastoral time limit. 
This does not look as if the removal 
of the limit has done much for the pas- 
tors of that conference if longevity of 
pastoral service without change of ap- 
pointment is a thing to be desired. — 
Exchange. 



The better acquainted I become 
with Jesus Christ the more I am be- 
coming an hilarious optimist. — Gypsy 
Smith. 



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Other lamps cost more, but you cannot get a better light than the low-priced Rayo 
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The Rayo is made of solid brass, with handsome nickel finish — an ornament anywhere. 
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The Foos engine is what you need for feed 
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PETERSBURG. VIRGINM 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as information and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:30 a. m. No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special, through Pullman sleeping 
and observation cars New York to 
Birmingham and Kichmond to Bir- 
mingham. Dining car service. 
12:48 a. m. No. 32 daily, the Southern's 
Southeastern Limited, Pullman 
sleeping cars from Jacksonville, 
Augusta and Aiken to New York. 
Dining car service. 
12:45 a. m. No. 112 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Pullman sleeping car 
from Winston-Salem to Raleigh 
open at 9:15 p. m. 

2:10 a. m. No. 30 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman sleeping and ob- 
servation cars from Birmingham 
and Asheville to New York and 
Birmingham to Richmond. Dining 
car service. 

2:25 a. m., No. 31, The Southern's South- 
eastern Limited, Pullman sleeping 
cars from New York to Jackson- 
ville, Aiken and Augusta and New 
York to Asheville. Day coaches. 
Dining car service. 

3:45 a. m. No. 45 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and 
points south. 

7:10 a. m. No. 8, daily local for Rich- 
mond, connecting at Danville with 
Norfolk train. 

7:20 a. m. No. 37 daily, New York 
Atlanta and New Orleans Limited, 
Pullman drawing room, sleeping 
cars and club and observation 
cars New York to New Orleans. 
Pullman sleeping car New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte and Macon. 
Pullman chair car Greensboro to 
Montgomery. Solid Pullman train. 
Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Durham 
and Raleigh. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11, daily local through 
to Atlanta, sleeping car from Rich- 
mond to Charlotte and Norfolk to 
Asheville. 

7:45 a. m. No. 154 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

8:15 a. m. No. 237 daily for Winston- 
Salem and daily except Sunday for 
North Wilkesboro. Pullman sleep- 
ing car Raleigh to Winston-Salem. 

9:30 a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 
and points North. 

9:30 a. m. No. 144 dally for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro, handles Atlanta-Raleigh 
sleeping car. 
12:30 p. m. No. 21 daily for Asheville, 
Waynesville and local points, 
handles coaches and chair car 
through to Asheville and Waynes- 
ville. 

12:50 p. m. No. 130 daily for Sanford, 

Fayetteville and Wilmington. 
12:55 p. m. No. 7 daily for Charlotte and 
points south. 

1:40 p. m. No. 36 daily U. S. Mail for 
Washington, New York and points 
north, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars from Birmingham and New 
Orleans to New York and Pullman 
sleeping car Asheville to Richmond. 
Pullman chair car Greenville to 
Wshington, day coaches, dining 
ear service. 

2:20 p. m. No. 207 daily except Sunday 
for Winston-Salem, making con- 
nection for North Wilkesboro. 

2:30 p. m. No. 151 daily except Sunday 
for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

3:35 p. m. No. 132 daily for Sanford. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Handles chair car to 
Goldsboro. 

4:55 p. m. No. 131 daily for Mt. Airy. 

6:10 p. m. No. 35 daily U. S. Fast Mail for 
Atlanta and points south. Pullman 
sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans and Birmingham and sleep- 
ing car Richmond to Asheville 
which can be occupied until 7 
o'clock a. m. Pullman chair car 
Washington to Greenville, S. C, 
dining car service. 

6:35 p. m. No. 235 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta. 
Sleeping car and coaches to At- 
lanta. 

10:30 p. m. No. 38 daily New York Atlanta 
and New Orleans Limited. Pull- 
man sleeping cars ana club and ob- 
servation cars New Orleans, Ma- 
con, Asheville and Charlotte to 
to New York and Pullman chair 
car Montgomery to Greensboro. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car 
service. 

10:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Winston-Sa- 
lem. 

10:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local for Rich- 
mond, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars for Richmond and Norfolk. 

E. H. COAPMAN, V. P. and G. M. 

Washington, D. C. 
S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M., 

Washington, D. C. 
H. F. CARY, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, D. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
W. H. McGLAMERY, P. & T. A., 

Greensboro, N. C. 



THE CROSS 

Nothing has ever convinced the 
world of forgiveness like the Cross of 
Christ. Nothing has so melted the 
hard unbelief with which fear and 
sin ihave surrounded our nature, as 
this sweet message of God's redemp- 
tion, in giving up his only son for us 
all. Like the ice upon some Alpine 
peak that has resisted the stormy 
winds of winter, but flows down in 
sparkling rivuplets when the warm 
breezes of spring blow, so hearts long 
congealed with fear and remorse will 
melt and flow down in gentle grief 
and holy aspiration because of the 
warm influence of divine love. The 
changed spirit begins to thrill with 
the emotions of pardon and expectancy 
as we hear of this transaction of in- 
finite pity revealed in the Savior's 
death. This cross proclaims the re- 
lease, which all who have fallen un- 
der the bondage of sin require. And 
there can be no more peaceful, no more 
stimulating message than that which 
the church is emboldened to give be- 
cause of this cross, "I believe in the 
forgiveness of sins." — Folconer. 



It estimated that the tipping habit 
in this country costs the commercial 
travelers alone in a year $50,000. No 
wonder the president of the Commer- 
cial Travelers' League has started a 
war on this dishonest habit. Add to 
the amount the commercial travelers 
have to pay for tipping what the oth- 
er people who ride on the railroads 
and steamships have to fork over for 
service in addition to the legitimate 
cost of travel and the sum is enor- 
mous. We wish the commercial trav- 
elers the fullest success in their cru- 
sade. — Ex. 



The story is told of how a young 
girl prayed that her classmates might 
like her. For months she prayed 
with apparently no effect; but out of 
her prayers the understanding came 
to her, suddenly, that unles sshe 
made herself lovable she could not 
hope to be loved. So she added ef- 
fort to her prayers, and soon found 
herself with many friends. Is there 
not here a hint for some who pray 
and nothing more — and who are dis- 
couraged accordingly? — Selected. 



"If none were sick and none were sad, 

What service could we render? 
I think if we were always glad, 

We scarcely could be tender. 
If sorrow never claimed our heart, 

And every wish were granted, 
Patience would die and hope depart — 

Life would be disenchanted." 



The South Georgia Conference raised 
last year for Conference Claimants 
$1,100 more than the assessment. 
The claimants were paid one hundred 
and twenty-three per cent, on appor- 
tionment. This was a most excellent 
showing and should be an inspiration 
to workers in other conferences, 
year. 



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LEADING JEWELERS 



As sheep do not show the goodness 
of their pasture by giving up the grass 
they have eaten, but by the excellence 
of the meat and fleece they afford, so 
must you approve the excellency of 
your doctrines to the world, not by 
disputes and plausible speeches, but 
by digesting them into practice and 
growing strong in virtue. — Epictetus. 



We all require to feed in the pas- 
tures and to drink at the wells of 
Holy Scripture. — William Ewart Glad- 
stone. 



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TETTERINE 50 cents at druggists, or 
by mail from Shuptrine Co., Savannah, 
Ga. • 





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ask your druggist about Milam. A 
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No blood remedy should contain 
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Board of Publication 



of the 

Western North Carolina Conference 
M. E. Church, South 

has charge of the publication of the Advocate. They also con- 
duct a General Printing Business, and are equipped for all lines of 

Job Printing 

The building and printing plant, situated at 1 1 0 East Gaston 
Street, belong exclusively to the Western North Carolina Con- 
ference; and all profits accruing from the publication of the 
North Carolina Christian Advocate, as well as from the General 
Printing Business, go to ^ superannuated preachers and wid- 
ows and orphans of d preachers of the Conference. 
The Board appeals to the n 0 ^ bers of the Church througout 
the Conference to give loyal re ftase to the pastors in their 
efforts to increase the circulation oi our paper, also to the busi- 
ness public to turn their Job Work, as far as possible, into this 
channel. 

Mail Orders for Job Work 

can be safely entrusted to us; and every order sent in helps a great enterprise of our Conference 

Stationary of All Sorts 

Posters, Circulars, Pamphlets, Programmes, Invitations, Cards, Church Envelopes, Circular 
Letters — in fact anything in the line of Job Printing. 

Specialties 

We have a special arrangement for binding. Preachers or others who have old books need- 
ing rebinding, or pamphlets, or magazines, which they desire to have bound, will find what they 
want here. 

IJ We also keep for sale the following Church requisites: 

1. Sunday School Register, approved by the most intelligent secretaries. 

2. Certificates of Baptism. 

3. Certificates of Membership. 



H. M. BLAIR, Treasurer, 
GREENSBORO - - - - N. C 



North Carolina 

Christian Advoc 

ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 




Thursday, January 11, 1912 

















THE MEN AND RELIGION 
FORWARD MOVEMENT 



"The Men and Religion Forward Movement 
is the biggest and boldest evangelistic move- 
ment ever planned in this country. We have 
watched evangelism outgrow the local church 
and grapple with whole cities. This move- 
ment plans to cover our whole vast country. 
Our industrial and commercial organization 
has ceased to be local and is becoming na- 
tional in its scope. Our religious organiza- 
tion is keeping pace. Men say the church is 
dying. This movement is a reply. The en- 
ergy of religion is inexhaustible. Like fire, it 
only needs freedom and the troubling storm- 
wind of necessity to fan a few live coals into 
flaming splendor. To tackle the impossible 
with a cheer is not a symptom of death. This 
movement is a front attack on that part of the 
enemy's lines which was supposed to be 
most impregnable — the men. Attack is the 
best kind of defense." „, 7j D , , , 

— W alter Kauscnenbuscn. 


















The Guilford Range 



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We are exclusive dealers for this section. We have handled a great 
many carloads of these ranges, and believe, without question, that 
they contain the best value on the market. You do not need to pay 
an agent $65.00 or $75.00 for a Range, as a large proportion of the 
price goes for profit and selling expense, neither do you need to 
order from a catalogue house a range you have never seen. The 
long distance means delay and extra danger of damage in transpor- 
tation. Later, when you need extra parts, it will be very inconven- 
ient and expensive to obtain them, and your local merchant can sell 
you the Guilford Range at a price which will give you better value 
than you can obtain from a catalogue house. As a baker, the Guil- 
ford has no superior. You cannot buy a range which will give you 
better service, no matter how much you pay for it. Those, having 
city, or private water supply, will find it unexcelled as a water 
heater, owing to the excellent water front. It can be furnished with 
reservoir also, for use where there is no water pressure. 

If your dealer does not carry the Guilford, write us for cata- 
logue, and give us his name. We shall be glad to send our handsome 
stove catalogue, showing not only the Guilford Ranges, but stoves, 
and other useful household articles, to any interested, provided 
this paper is mentioned. 



ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



IT IS THE DUTY OF EVERY MAN * 

To invest his savings where they will be safe and yield satisfactory returns. 

We are in position to offer those desiring to invest small or large amounts, 
carefully selected bank stocks, or preferred stocks in industrial companies, paying 
seven to eight per cent, annual interest. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

SOUTHERN LIFE AND TRUST COMPANY 

A. W. McALISTER, President A. M. SCALES, Vice-President and General Counsel 

R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President S. A. KERR, Assistant Manager 



Are you going to get married? 

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Invitations, Announcements and Enclosure Cards. Our engrav- 
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from us you know you are getting the best at a moderate price 



The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C 



ESTABLISHED 1S55 



h. m. blair. Editor Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South 



Volume LVII. GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY II, 1912 Number 2 



* 

j EDITORIAL 

I i > 

ECHOES OF A NEW YEAR HOMILY 

There is nothing wrong in the attempt to start 
anew in the New Year except the failure to keep 
on going. So many of us have only the warming 
of good impulses which do not reach the point of 
a fixed resolution. Perhaps there are few who can 
truly adopt the language of the Psalmist and say, 
"My heart is fixed, O God, my heart is fixed." 

Among the recent resolutions for a better life 
toward the fulfillment of which many of our read- 
ers are now struggling there is the effort to leave 
some unpleasant and regretful things behind. The 
editor of the Outlook, in a New Year's Homily, says: 

The praises of memory have been often sung. 
But to be able to forget what should be forgotten 
is as advantageous as to be able to remember what 
should be remembered. We praise a good forget- 
tery. 

Forget your enemies. Forget the wrongs that 
have been done you, the insults that have been of- 
fered you, the injuries you have suffered. Or re- 
member them only to seek out some occasion for 
helping him who has wronged you. You have vow- 
ed he shall never have an opportunity to insult 
you again. Right. One way is to avoid him; the 
other way is to make him your friend. 

Forget your faults and failures. Or remember 
them only to learn the lesson they have to teach, 
the frailty or folly or wickedness of spirit which 
they should disclose to you — the vanity and weak- 
ness, the pride that hardens, the greed that cor- 
rupts. Let your past be not a ball and chain tied 
to your ankle to keep you back, but a journal to 
tell you what road you have traveled. Then, look- 
ing back only long enough to see where you are 
and what your course should be, forget the things 
that are behind and press forward. 

Forget not your sorrows. You can not forget 
them. You do not wish to forget them. But for- 
get their bitterness. Forget the despairing, failing 
battle against them. Forget the doubts of God's 
goodness and life's value which they awakened in 
you. Remember the alleviations the consolations, 
the love of the loved one in the past, the sympathy 
of friends in the present, the comfort of God's pres- 
ence in all. Call to remembrance your songs in 
the night. 

To remember the enmities of the year is to cul- 
tivate the spirit of hate; to remember the sins of 
the year is to indulge in the bitterness of remorse; 
to remember the unavailing struggles against ap- 
proaching sorrow in the year is to continue the 
struggle after the issue has been determined. 
• Only a little of our life is spent in the present. 
Most of it is spent in memories of the past or in 
anticipations of the future. You can mane these 
memories sorrowful, or joyful, these anticipations, 
fears or hopes. 



THE DOINGS OF A DOLLAR— A LESSON IN 
ECONOMICS 

On the first day of the month a one dollar bill 
started on its journey when Mr. Smith promptly 
paid Mr. Brown what he was due him. Brown 
paid the dollar immediately to George Green, who 
in turn paid it to William Hart, who was owing 
John White the same amount and passed the dol- 
lar on. Here we lost sight of that busy dollar of 
good money just as it went into the pocket of 
William Grip. It had now discharged five dollars 
of indebtedness and could have just as easily gone 
on its happy mission till fifty creditors would have 
been smiling; but William Grip held on to the dol- 
lar notwithstanding he owed that amount to John 



Goodsoul, his next door neighbor, who, in the cold 
days of December had loaned him the amount to 
get a load of wood that his family might not suf- 
fer. 

William Grip decided to hold on to the dollar as 
he said he "lowed it mout be a good long spell" oe- 
fore he got hold of another. So that dollar was 
retired from the happy mission of doing its part as 
a portion of the circulating medium, and the ma- 
chinery in the great system of commerce dependent 
upon it stood still. 

This is a fable, intended to show how the wheels 
of business are made to stand still and the happi- 
ness and prosperity of the whole country blighted 
by worthless fellows who will not pay a debt when 
they could do so. Our whole system of credit is 
very much of a delusion and a snare. Everybody 
would be happier if all would pay as they go, and 
it is a crime against society to pocket and hold on 
to a dollar which we owe to another. 



A GREAT PERIODICAL 

We are glad to add our mite to the almost uni- 
versal commendation of the work of Dr. Gross 
Alexander, editor of our excellent Quarterly Re- 
view. We see no periodical, which in our judg- 
ment, excels this in able and very readable discus- 
sion of the living questions of the day. Our pas- 
tors would do a great service to many of their in- 
telligent laymen by calling their attention to the 
Review. 

The editor of the Christian Guardian, referring 
to the Review, says: 

"We would like most heartily to commend this 
publication to the ministers and thoughtful lay- 
men of our Church. 

Most unhesitatingly we say that we do not think 
it is surpassed by any publication of its kind in 
the world. Under former management it was good, 
but Dr. Alexander seems to have brought to his 
task of editing it especial gifts and qualifications 
that have given it an altogether new and distinc- 
tive quality. Sound and constructive in scholar- 
ship; diversified and comprehensive in its discus- 
sions; alert to appreciate the currents of thought 
and living topics of the times, it is such a publica- 
tion as can well serve the interests of any earnest 
Methodist. 

"Dr. Alexander was a member of the recent Ecu- 
menical Conference. His paper on "The Social 
Teaching of the Old and New Testament" was one 
of the treats of the Conference, and served well to 
show his scholarship and ability. Those who met 
him at the Conference for the first time were de- 
lighted to find in him not only the able scholar, 
but the genial brother and friend as well." 



MENACE OF THE ROMAN HIERARCHY 

The present generation is not aware of the dan- 
ger which threatens our free institutions on ac- 
count of the rapid growth of the Roman Catholic 
Church. The Average American thinks of this 
great organization only as a church, whereas it is 
a Hierarchy and one of the wealthiest and most 
consummate political machines on earth. There 
is perhaps now no country on the globe where it 
is receiving more encouragement than in ours, and 
there are evidences of increasing purpose to get 
possession of governmental agencies for propaga- 
tion. 

The Catholic World of New York, one of the 
leading defenders of the Catholic faith is quoted 
as saying: 

"The Roman Catholic is to wield his vote for 
the purpose of securing Catholic ascendency in this 
country. All legislation must be governed by the 
will of God unerringly indicated by the Pope. Ed- 
ucation must be controlled by the Catholic authori- 



ties, and under education the opinions of the indi- 
viduals and the utterances of the press are includ- 
ed. Many opinions are to be forbidden by the secu- 
lar arm, under the authority of the Church, even 
to war and bloodshed." 



INTO THE HIGHWAYS AND HEDGES 

These were the places into which the gospel was 
to go with a compelling force. The parable 
in which Jesus uses the figure of the urgent call 
to a great supper is intended not only to expose the 
wickedness of those who spurn the invitation of di- 
vine goodness, but it likewise shows the futility 
of all efforts to save that are lacking in intensity or 
aggressiveness. The feeble and half-hearted spirit 
which often characterizes the work of the ministry 
is sure to prove worthless in every case. Nothing 
but going after them with the spirit of determina- 
tion will yield to the minister the coveted reward 
of souls for his hire. 

It is a little strange that so many seem to forget 
that the best asset of the soul-seeker, whether he 
be layman or minister, is the spirit of earnestness. 
Such a spirit breaks forth in a zeal which is like 
that of John the Baptist, of whom it was said that 
even the least in the Kingdom of Heaven is greater. 
Under these latter-day evangelists "the Kingdom 
of Heaven suffereth violence and the violent take 
it by force." There is no easy-going or perfunctory 
service possible where the spirit of the modern 
prophet of the kingdom has taken possession of 
a man, or of the Christian men and women of the 
community. If the congregation has fallen off 
such zeal finds its way to the places of amusement 
or of public resort — into the highways and hedges, 
wherever the careless and indifferent have resorted 
in quest of pleasure, amusement or congenial com- 
panionship. Thus by a persistent following up the 
careless and indifferent ones, many of them, are 
compelled to give attention to the call of the gos- 
pel. 

The same is true not only in reference to the one 
matter of soul-saving which is the great matter of 
the kingdom but whatever is undertaken must be 
undertaken with the might of determination. If 
it is a missionary campaign, or a campaign for the 
circulation of religious literature, there must be the 
same zeal to reach and touch the remotest corners 
where men and women suffer from intellectual and 
moral destitution. None should be reckoned as too 
obscure or too benighted, nor should we turn our 
footsteps away from the doors of the godless rich. 
The gospel makes its appeal alike to all classes 
and we should never lose confidence in it as the 
power of God unto salvation whether in the palace 
or in the slum. The richest rewards of zealous ef- 
fort are often found in the homes of the lowly, 
and not infrequently among those whom godless 
wealth has separated from the society of the good as 
effectually as the squallor of poverty has separated 
the poor. 

The zeal that saves the world is the zeal that 
first dissatisfies us with any service which is mere- 
ly formal or perfunctory. Lord, give unto thy ser- 
vants such a zeal, that they may see the way which 
leads into the highways and hedges, where the 
multitudes are! 



The good results of only a few years of closed 
saloons in North Carolina have been plainly mani- 
fest during the holidays. The papers throughout 
the State have commented on the general absence 
of the usual amount of drinking and carousing. 
Webster's Weekly says: "To us the most gratify- 
ing feature of the Christmas holidays was the ab- 
sence of the old-time -scenes of drunkenness. Reids- 
ville has never known so sober a Christmas." The 
holiday shipments of liquor fell off fully one-half 
according to Mr. N. C. Thompson, agent of the 
Southern Express Co. 



Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 191! 



THE ADVOCATE IN EVERY HOME 

This is to be the rallying cry of preachers and 
laymen according to the resolution adopted at our 
last Annual Conference. The "Concord Plan" an- 
ticipates organization of the official board so as to 
put the paper in every home. We are now sending 
out thousands of sample copies so as to prepare 
the way for a successful canvass in every charge. 

A presiding elder wrote us some time ago that 
he did not think there was much room for increase 
in his district, yet his official list sent in since that 
time, shows that less than half the official mein- 
beis are taking the paper. Judging from the four 
official lists sent in by presiding elders, there are 
at least two thousand official members in the West- 
ern .North Carolina Conference who do not take 
the Advocate. Is it time to stop pressing the Ad- 
vocate circulation while such a state of things ex- 
ists? 

Only four presiding elders and twelve preachers 
have complied with the resolution of the Confer- 
ence by sending the lists. How can we do our part 
of the work by furnishg sample copies unless pre- 
siding elders and pastors will furnish us the lists? 
We reprint that part of the report of the commit- 
tee on Books and Periodicals referring to this work 
as follows: 

"We feel that we have a paper that is worthy of a 
place in all our homes and that the time has come 
for a concerted effort to place it in every family 
represented in our membership. With this in view 
we suomit the following recommendations: 

1. That we adopt the Concord plan of circulat- 
ing the paper. 

2. In order to prepare the way for the effective 
working of this plan, each presiding elder is urged 
to furnish the Advocate office full lists of the offi- 
cial members in his district with postoffice address- 
es; also the pastors are requested to furnish 
the office with the names and addresses of all fam- 
ilies not taking the paper and that this informa- 
tion be furnished not later than January 20th, next. 

3. That February be designated as Advocate 
month, when an earnest effort shall be made to 
place the paper in every home." 

We trust that it will not be necessary to repeat 
this call for the lists and that before our next is- 
sue we will have received lists from every pastor 
and presiding elder in the Conference. 



THE DAY OF OPPORTUNITY IN CHINA 

Let no one lose heart because China is rent by 
revolution. As we said last week these agitations 
are but the growing pains of a nation thoroughly 
awakened. We might say with propriety that they 
are the birth pains of a new nation. Mr. William 
T. Ellis, who has made many tours of the world, 
says: 

"Assuredly, China has broken with the past: 'be- 
hold, all things are made new.' Shall Christian 
missions rise to this opportunity? An entirely new, 
systematic and comprehensive scheme of operation 
is called for. All individual enterprises should be 
related to the whole. A unified scheme of educa- 
tional and medical work, and a nation-wide plan of 
uniform and inter-related evangelism, are plainly 
demanded by the present unique conditions. The 
leaders of the Church in China should meet the new 
government with a formal statement of what Chris- 
tianity is and what it offers to China. In this criti- 
cal hour of the centuries, ancient China is on trial; 
but no more so than the Christian church." 



DR. WILBUR F. CRAFTS VISITS GREENSBORO 

Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, 
a crowd that filled the auditorium of West Market 
Street church turned out to hear Rev. Dr. Wilbur 
F. Crafts, who delivered his third lecture of the 
day at that place on last Sunday night. 

Dr. Crafts' talk, which dealt mainly with the inter- 
state liquor traffic, was full of encouragement to 
those who are striving to free our State from this 
government-protected curse. He said that the only 
obstacle now in the way of the passage of a bill 
prohibiting the inter-state shipment of liquor was 
getting it under the consideration of the House. 
Dr. Crafts urged the people, individually and col- 
lectively, to impress upon the Congressmen, by let- 
ters and telegrams, the importance of this bill. 
"If the bill once gets a hearing, it will be passed," 
said Dr. Crafts. The only thing left to be done now 
is to enthuse our people with a determination to be 
free from the inter-state liquor traffic, and that is 



Dr. Crafts' object is visiting this state. It is use- 
less to say that he succeeded in stirring the con- 
sciences of those who heard him. 

Dr. Crafts spoke at the First Presbyterian 
church in the morning and at Centenary Methodist 
church at 3 o'clock. 



THE PREACHER AND HIS LIVING 

The following note is from the Winston Repub- 
lican of January 4th: 

"Rev. G. E. Eaves, pastor of Main Street Metho- 
dist Church, High Point, resigned his charge last 
week and left for Chicago, where he will be con-, 
nected with a publishing house. In an open let- 
ter to the public Mr. Eaves says he finds it impos- 
sible to make a living for himself and family at 
the salary he was receiving, but that he will prob- 
ably take up evangelistic work later on." 

Similar references to the departure of Brother 
Eaves have appeared in many of the papers, and 
we deem it but just to the people of S. Main St. con- 
gregation as well as to Methodists of the State that 
exact facts should be stated as to the support given 
the pastor of this church for a number of years. 
The congregation some years ago erected a splen- 
did house of worship and near by an elegant home 
for the pastor. The house is roomy, well construct- 
ed, and equipped with all modern improvements 
and the pastor, of course, occupies this home free 
of rent. The average salary for a number of years 
has been $900.00 including an appropriation of 
of $100.00 by the Board of Missions. According to 
the report published in the minutes, Brother Eaves 
received $950.00 last year, and his salary presuma- 
bly would not have been less if he had remained. 
Brother Eaves has a wife and two children. Rev. 
O. P. Ader, with a wife and four children, occu- 
pied this pastorate for three years preceding Mr. 
Eaves. 

Now we do not contend that the salary at South 
Main Street is sufficient to keep a family without 
close economy, but the publicity given this inci- 
dent without specific statement of the facts, 
is calculated to do the brave little congregation 
of 336 members at South Main Street an injustice. 
Besides, it ought to be said in a general way that 
a man who cannot live under such conditions and 
keep free from debt had better keep shy of the 
ministry in any denomination in North Carolina, 
or anywhere in the world. Hundreds of capable and 
consecrated men are serving faithfully and re- 
ceiving less. 



MULTIPLYING CHURCH MACHINERY 

A letter from a presiding elder some time ago 
intimated a good degree of perplexity on account of 
the large number of specialists now in the field 
trying to help push forward the work of the king- 
dom. There was an intimation that the mails were 
.bringing stacks of letters from special agents, sec- 
retaries of boards, movements and the like telling 
the elder what to do till life had become a trifle 
miserable. 

Now the Advocate has been trying to keep some 
w.here in sight of the procession and has never 
felt willing to antagonize any agency or organiza- 
tion set up by the conference or the church at large. 
It does seem, however, that we are in danger of 
losing sight of the fact that our system of pastoral 
work and presiding eldership, (better named dis- 
trict superintendent by our Northern brethren j, 
provides for ample representation of all interests, 
and that the presiding elder should be encouraged to 
magnify rather than discredit his office by parcel- 
ing out the work among various other agencies. 

The Wesleyan Christian Advocate quotes Bishop 
Candler as saying that our Church is being so sup- 
plied with machinery that he is afraid to walk 
across the platform lest his feet become entangled 
with some of the wires which are designed to con- 
duct the power of the different machines that are 
to do the work of the church. To the same purpose 
are the following words from Bishop Anderson, of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church: 

"I am amazed at the confusion that exists among 
us, uttering itself in a whole lot of so-called 'move- 
ments.' A good Methodist told me the other day 
that what between Epworth League Societies, 
Christian Endeavor Societies, and Laymen's Mis- 
sionary Movements and all that sort of thing, he 
could not find the Methodist Church. And, I tell 
you, it is going to be a great loss to American life 
if it loses that for which the old-fashioned Metho- 



dist Church used to stand. No, we have so manj 
movements going on — Laymen's Missionary Move 
nrents, Laymen's Forward Movements, Men anc 
Religion Movements, Brotherhood of St. Andrew 
Movements, Social Study Class Movements — w< 
have so many of those things going on that, really 
we are in danger of not being able to see the woods 
for the trees." 

After all, there are two sides to the question 
Possibly the exigency of the times demands some- 
or all of these special organizations and agenciei 
and they deserve our encouragement and co-opera 
tion if they are accomplishing the work needec 
for the time being. Nothing should be condemnec 
because it is new, nor should one cling to anything 
simply because it served well a former generation 
The intelligent man gives the church credit for al 
movements that are working for good, because the: 
could not exist without the church. 



OBSERVATIONS 

The Minutes of the last Conference are by thi! 
time generally distributed. It was my expectatioi 
to have them all issued a week before the holiday.' 
but circumstances over which 1 had no control de 
layed the work till after the new year began. Then 
are a few minor errors discovered too late to bi 
corrected. It seems next to impossible to get th< 
proof perfect when we remember that the proo 
sheets of Webster's Dictionary were read seventy 
five times before all the errors were discovered. 

By an oversight on the part of the Bishop anc 
his cabinet, and then by the Secretary who is will 
ing to share his . part of the blame, the name o 
Rev. L. B. Abernethy, our Educational Secretary 
does not appear in the list of appointments. Thi: 
discovery was made after the appointments wen 
read and attention was called to it verbally ii 
the rush of the appointments, so that I failed t< 
promptly enter his name in the Waynesville list 
but it is now properly recorded in the official min 
utes. 

All the statistical work was done by three ex 
perienced and accurate bookkeepers. The financia 
statistics were tabulated by Mr. F. B. Bunch, cash 
ier of one of the Statesville banks, the membershii 
table was worked by Rev. J. F. Harrelson and thi 
Epworth League and Sunday School table by Rev 
W. F. Sandford. 

These brethren deserve thanks for faithful service 
for I know they all did their work as well as it has 
ever been done. Errors however, may be discover 
ed as it is so hard to make anything absolutel; 
perfect in this world. 

* * * * 

In the study of the statistics we discover somi 
important truths which should encourage us in ou; 
work. In 1890 when our Conference was organize! 
the reports show that we had 56,524 members an( 
every year since has marked a steady increasi 
showing an average annual net gain of 1,888 mem 
bers or a total increase for the twenty-one years o 
39,647, so that now we have a gross membershi] 
of 95,171. During the past year the number re 
ceived on profession of faith reached 5,575 and thi 
net gain for the year was 2,835. In 1890 our Con 
ference was but an average in membership but i 
has grown from 130 to 225 pastoral charges anc 
from 56,524 to 95,171 in membership taking rani 
among the largest Conferences in the connection. 

Since 1890 we have gained 184 Sunday schools 
1,478 Sunday school teachers and 37,202 Sunda: 
school scholars. 

In 1890 our Woman's Mission work was so poor 
ly organized that the statistics were not furnishei 
but in 1911 we had 190 Woman's Foreign anc 
Home societies with 5,915 members who raised $29, 
273.00 in money to extend the kingdom which ii 
equal to about a $5.00 per capita contribution. Thi 
work of women in these societies has not only de 
veloped in them the grace of liberality but increas 
ed their knowledge of the needs of mission field: 
and so broadened their sympathies that they have 
liberalized the men to the extent that our Confer 
ence contributions to missions, foreign and domes 
tic has grown from $12,000.00 in 1890 to $36,000.0( 
in 1911. 

* * * * 

In 1890 the total amount paid for the support o 
the ministry was $62,000.00, the average salar; 
of the preachers was $476.00 and there were bu 
six charges that paid as much as $1,000.00 to the 
pastor. Asheville — Central paid $1,750.00, Tryoi 
St. Charlotte, and Centenary, Winston, paid $1,50( 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE Page Three 



January 11, 1912 



each. West Market Street, Greensboro, $1,250.00, 
Reidsville, $1,150.00 and Central Church, Monroe, 
$1,000.00 and only seven other charges paid as 
much as $800.00. The amount raised that year for 
all purposes was $160,000.00 an average per capita 
contribution of $2.85 and the value of all our 
church property was $790,000.00. In striking con- 
trast to these figures it is interesting to note that 
last year the total amount raised for pastors reach- 
ed $162,000.00 and the average salaries were $718.00. 
But there were 78 of these preachers whose salar- 
ies ranged from $800.00 to $2,500.00 striking an 
average of $1,191.00 while the remaining 147 preach- 
ers received average salaries of $467.00. 

Last year we raised for all purposes $505,000.00 
being an average per capita contribution of $5.31 
and the value of all our church property has reach- 
ed the significant sum of $2,400,000.00. 

The study of these figures reveals the further 
fact that while our people give the preachers much 
better salaries in the main than they did twenty 
odd years ago there were last year of the above 
number, fifty-two preachers none of whose salaries 
exceeded $400.00 and many of them ranged from 
$150.00 to $300.00 each, but of course these received 
additional but stinted help from the mission board 
and the charges they serve are doing far better 
now in this regard than they did in the former 
years. 

* » * * 

From all this we discover that during all these 
years our membership has increased 70 per cent 
while our gross contributions to ministerial sup- 
port have increased 160 per cent, but we have near- 
ly one hundred more preachers on the roll than we 
had then, which brings down the average salary to 
a point below what the gross increase would in- 
dicate. In other words we had 130 pastoral charges 
in 1890 against 225 in 1911, so that a much larger 
number of preachers participate in the contribu- 
tions now. The value of our church property has 
increased 350 per cent. All this indicates lift, 
growth, progress, and we should "thank God and 
take courage." But with it all our people are more 
able to give liberally to the church than they ever 
have been hitherto. I have not the statistics at 
hand but am safe in the statement that our Meh- 
odist people in Western North Carolina have heap- 
ed up and increased their property holdings far 
more than 350 per cent, in the past two decades. 
No part of the nation has grown at such leaps and 
bounds in the past twenty years as our own sec- 
tion. Great manufacturing communities have been 
built where poverty abounded before and vast com- 
mercial enterprises have been developed so that 
wilderness places have been converted into busy 
marts. All over our territory the people have 
caught the twentieth century quick step and we are 
just beginning to realize the vastness of our possi- 
bilities. 

Just stop and think for a moment what progress 
has been made in Charlotte, Winston, Greensboro, 
High Point, Thomasville, Salisbury, Concord, Gas- 
tonia, Albemarle, Hickory, Statesville, Canton, 
Asheville, Monroe, Wadesboro and all the other 
towns for that matter since 1890 and this growth is 
but an index of what has taken place in nearly 
every township, within our borders, through which 
a railroad has been built. I could almost count on 
my fingers the number of banks in Western North 
Carolina twenty-five years ago, while today there 
is a banking house in almost every hamlet. Vast 
progress has been made in material development 
and Methodist people have had much to do with 
bringing these things to pass and they are too 
active and frugal a folk not to have received their 
full share of the profits. 

* • * • 

In all our material growth let us never forget 
that we owe our first obligation to the church of 
Jesus Christ. It first lays the foundation upon 
which we must build before we can go forward in 
any worthy endeavor. The church is the conserver 
of order, the teacher of morals, the propagator of 
the truth and the builder of noble character and 
without these we can have no progress or even a 
spark of civilization. The church has therefore 
blazed the way and cleared the path by first laying 
the foundations of character, of uprightness and 
self-denial in the very fibre of the men who have 
accomplished these marvelous wonders in com- 
mercial growth. 

The people therefore owe to the church a debt 
of loyalty and gratitude which can be met only by 
upright living and generous giving. Have we really 



done even our duty so far? Has the church kept 
in front or abreast of the commercial world in the 
march of progress, or has it lagged a little way be- 
hind? It has been the forerunner of every real 
blessing that has come to the human family and 
we should remember the source of blessings. 

This is all written to show that the church has 
made progress and from a study of the figures on- 
ly, great progress; but we could not be content 
with anything less than we have done when we 
consider the general growth of the country. In 
these years splendid temples have been built to 
the glory of God — great improvement has been made 
in our church architecture, better parsonages pro- 
vided for the preachers and the furnishings in them 
are greatly improved, vast missionary enterprises 
launched at home and abroad, our educational work 
greatly enlarged, our people have had a much wider 
vision of the kingdom and many thousands have 
been added to the church. 

The rank and file of our membership are not rich, 
many who are poor in this world's goods are rich 
in faith, but giving to the point of self-denial have 
received rich blessings in return. But the average 
Methodist is able to give more now than twenty 
years ago and he does give a good deal more, not 
only because he is able to, but because he has 
grown in the grace of giving and wants to give. 
* * * * 

In studying the financial problem of the church 
we must remember that while the totals contribut- 
ed today far exceed the past and while many 
preachers get better salaries than formerly, that 
the money does not go near so far proportionally 
as it used to for the purchasing power of a dollar 
is not anything like it was in 1890. Then too, the 
preacher whose income has not increased has a 
very serious and constant problem to solve. The 
increased cost of living is not only higher prices 
for the actual necessities but an increase in the 
necessities. People generally live better than they 
used to. They have better houses and furnishings, 
wear better clothes, travel more, and have far more 
comforts and conveniences. The luxuries of a gen- 
eration ago are the absolute necessities in these lat- 
ter days. This is a sign of progress. This has 
most to do with the increased cost of living. With- 
out an increased income it requires intense econ- 
omy to make ends meet. W. L. S. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— A movement is on foot for the Men and Relig- 
ion Forward Movement in Greensboro, a commit- 
tee having been appointed who will have charge 
of the campaign. 

— Rev. and Mrs. H. H. Jordan most delightfully 
entertained on Friday night the young people of 
the Methodist church who are attending school in 
other towns and were spending the holidays in 
Morganton. The presence and graciousness of 
Miss Lucy Jordan added much to the pleasure of 
the guests. — Morganton News Herald. 

— The Henrietta Correspondent of the Rutherford- 
ton Sun says: "The new Methodist pastor for this 
pastoral charge, Rev. J. F. Armstrong, is making a 
fine impression upon his people. 

— Rev. Graham H. Lambuth is now managing ed- 
itor of the Richmond Christian Advocate, having 
taken charge January 1st. Admirably equipped for 
the work he will no doubt make a strong paper. 

— Judge W. J. Montgomery, of Concord, went 
to the Charlotte Sanitorium last week for treat- 
ment. The judge has not been so well recently 
and we sincerely hope he may find relief in treat- 
ment at the sanitorium. 

— We note with sincere regret the death of Mr. 
J. T. Montgomery, of Lenoir, which occurred at his 
home in that place on Thursday of last week. Mr. 
Montgomery was a loyal member of the Methodist 
Church and will be greatly missed. 

— The two sons of Rev. C. M. Campbell of the 
Methodist church are here on a visit to their fath- 
er's home. Prof. Mack Campbell is superintendent 
of the public school at Jonesboro and Mr. Weaver 
Campbell is a student at Weaverville College. — 
Davidson Cor. Charlotte Observer. 

— Mr. H. T. Hudson, of Shelby, eon of the late 
Rev. Dr. H. T. Hudson, has been appointed to a 
clerkship at Washington under Senator Lee S. Ov- 
erman. Brother Hudson has for some time been 
serving as Recorder and Auditor of Cleveland Co. 

— Rev. T. E. Wyche, who had charge of the Rural 
Hall Circuit during the last two years has been 



assigned to the Mount Pleasant Circuit, North 
Carolina Conference. This circuit lies in Wilson 
and Nash counties and the parsonage is at Bailey, 
on the Norfolk and Southern Railway. 

—Rev. B. T. Hurley, of the North Carolina Con- 
ference, and pastor of the Methodist church at 
Mebane, was maried on Wednesday morning, 
Dec. 27th, to Miss Ruth Tate Franklin, of Haw 
River. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. 
R. C. Beaman, presiding elder of the Durham Dis- 
trict. 

— After twelve months of service, Rev. Edward 

F. Ley retires from the editorship of the Florida 
Christian Advocate. He gave to Florida Method- 
ism splendid srevice in that important work, and 
we note with regret his retirement. We extend 
the right hand of fellowship to his successor, Rev. 
D. B. Sweat. 

— Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Coltrane, of Concord, have 
announced the engagement of their daughter, Ruth 
Louise, to Mr. Charles A. Cannon. No date for 
the marriage has been set. Miss Coltrane has many 
friends in Greensboro, where she attended Greens- 
boro Female College, graduating from that institu- 
tion last year. 

— Mr. E. G. Moseley, editor of the Danville Meth- 
odist, called to see us on Friday. He was on the 
sad mission of conveying the body of his brother, 
Mr. J. B. Moseley, of Winston-Salem, to Danville 
for burial. He spoke in the strongest terms of ap- 
preciation of the exceeding kindness of the mem- 
bers of Centenary church, who did everything for 
the comfort of the stricken family. 

— Rev. Robert S. Howie, who was appointed 
nominally as junior preacher of the Pineville Cir- 
cuit, has by Presiding Elder Scroggs been assigned 
as preacher in charge of Calvary church, Charlotte, 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Rev. W. 
P. McGhee. Brother Howie is a graduate of Trini- 
ty College, of the class of 1895, and a preacher of 
first rate ability, who, we feel sure will render good 
service at Calvary. 

— On Monday, Jan. 1st, at 10 a. m., at the home 
of the bride's parents, at Franklin, N. C, Miss Mar- 
garet Gay, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. J. E. Gay, 
was happily married to Mr. J. G. Hickerson, of 
Andrews, Rev. J. E. Gay, father of the bride offi- 
ciating. Mr. Hickerson is the son of Col. and 
Mrs. Hickerson, of Andrews, and is cashier of the 
Bank of Andrews. The Advocate joins their many 
friends in congratulations. 

— The Lenoir Topic says: "The attention of the 
Topic has been called to the fact that Mr. and Mrs. 
Giles Tolbert, of Little River township, will cele- 
brate the 67th anniversary of their marriage next 
July. Is there another couple in Caldwell county 
who have lived together so long?" Blessings on 
these good old faithful people! When a little boy 
the editor of the Advocate knew them as among 
the most loyal of the elderly people in Cedar 
Valley church. 

— The Granite Falls correspondent of the Lenoir 
Topic January 1, says: "The Methodist pulpit 
yesterday at 11 a. m. was filled by Rev. P. L. Ter- 
rell and at night by Mr. L. B. Hayes, a son of Esq. 

G. W. Hayes. Young Mr. Hayes is a ministerial 
student and is at home through vacation from Em- 
ory and Henry College. His sermon last night 
was a most excellent one, and everything points 
toward his being one of the foremost preachers of 
the Conference. 

— We have learned with deep regret of the death 
"of Mr. Lindolph Parks, of Roaring River, Wilkes 
County. Mr. Parks was one of the. landmarks of 
Methodism in Wilkes and one of her best citizens. 
No truer man ever lived. His wife, who was Miss 
Lucinda Petty to whom he was married in 1850, 
preceded him to the home above many years ago. 
He was in his 86th year. His death occurred on 
December 20th, and his funeral was conducted Dec- 
ember 22nd by Rev. M. H. Vestal. 

— Mr. W. H. Swift, of this city, who was elected 
field secretary of the North Carolina child labor 
committee at a meeting held in Raleigh last week, 
will soon start upon his work of organization in 
the state. He will begin in Greensboro, his home 
town. Mr. Swift will visit all of the counties of 
the State that have mills or large towns in them. 
He is very sanguine, believing that North Carolina 
people will rally to the support of this cause in the 
interest of the children. Mr. Swift has peculiar 
gifts which we believe specially qualify him for 
this work and we hope to see him accomplish a 
really great work for which there is a great oppor- 
tunity. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 1912 



NOW AND THEN 

Occasional Notions as They Occur ; 

i By Trojan < 
j. « ^ 

"When we look Into the long avenue of the fu- 
ture and see the good there is for each one of us 
— to do, we realize after all what 
/ a beautiful thing it is to work, 
/ , gig. \ and to live, and be happy." He 

vsifedP^ •'• I wll ° gave utterance to the fore- 
I! going exquisite words was at the 
jH time sick unto death and knew 
^HBSjjPlta^sf it; but this knowledge did not 
^B^^'H^ retard the growing of a spirit ot 
good cheer that has been a bless- 
ing to many others who have been called to live and 
work in the shaddow of what we call death. 

* * * * 

"Those who bring sunshine into the lives of oth- 
ers, cannot keep it from themselves." My friend 
comes ocassionally to see me and his visit is not 
a pop-call. He is a great-hearted man and the sun- 
shine he brings into my room is not concealed from 
him. It is good to have such a friend and it makes 
us think of the old times when this friendly visit- 
ing was much more general than at the present. 
This is not a wail from one who thinks the old 
times much better than the present but the rush 
after and nursing the dollar spirit has shut out 
much of the old fashioned social life. 

* * * _ * 

Some friend sent us a turkey Christmas and it 
was a very suitable remembrance and we all en- 
joyed it of course. There is no other meat equal 
to turkey and we always have a certain amount of 
sympathetic interest in the man who doesn't have 
a turkey and says he really "likes chicken better." 
Chicken is good if not too tough but there is 
nothing to take the place of turkey at Thanksgiving 
and Christmas. One of my boys expressed the best 
of thanks for this gift when he jumped up, cracked 
his heels together and said: "I am so glad some- 
body sent us a turkey!" His daddy was glad too. 

* * * * 

Any one who reads the Greensboro Daily News 
must be convinced that Col. Phillips, "who writes 
the snappy paragraphs, is fond of pie. There is 
no season of the year not having some pie suited 
to his taste but he appears to get exuberantly 
happy over a pumpkin pie. Right there is where 
we can't keep up with him on the pie question. We 
have been willing at times to try a little for polite- 
ness sake provided there was sufficient seasoning 
in it to curtail the taste of the pumpkin. Now if 
it be cherry pie with the crust "crispus", as my 
cook used to say, that's what I call pie that is pie. 

* * * % * 

"Those who live in the mountains have a longer 
day than those who live in the valley. Sometimes 
all we need to lighten our day is to rise a little high- 
er." Apropos of this, my friend writes me as fol- 
lows: "What we call the new year marks the pas- 
sage of time, and suggests to all of us both retro- 
spect and prospect. Looking backward and count- 
ing the years I am reminded that I have passed 
the meridian of life, and am now facing the setting 
sun. But I see no lengthening shaddows, for I 
am looking up and not down, as I expect to meet 
my sunset on the mountain top. The pathway so 
far has been often rough and sometimes steep. The 
rough places have taught me caution and patience, 
while the steep places have led up and not down. 
I find only occasion for thanksgiving and no room 
left for repinings." 

My friend who wrote as quoted in the foregoing 
paragraph, has been a busy man for many years 
and his strength is by no means yet abated. He must 
have felt good when getting up that card he sent 
to other friends. He could not well have written 
it had he felt otherwise. But it helped me, for each 
day that comes it is my lot to try and see through 
the cypress trees. But after all, whether we be 
strong or weak in the flesh "Its the songs you sing 
and the smiles you wear that makes the sunshine 
everywhere?" The life that is given to dark fore- 
bodings and that refuses to live hopefully is no good 
for this world. 

* • • • 

It is rather evident that our brother, Governor 
Wilson, is not much on the mountain top these 
days. Perhaps his happiest days were spent amid 



the classic shades of Princeton. His enemies are 
now after him. Few months ago it looked as if 
he was a winner for the nomination to the presi- 
dency on the Democratic ticket. He is a good man, 
a great- man, but as with all men going into politics 
he must pay the price. It frequently happens that 
a man gets the impession he is called to a great 
reform when the call was for some one else. This 
is not intimating he could not be a great president 
but the tide now seems to be against him. 

* * * * 

"Get into the habit of looking for the silver lin- 
ing of the cloud, and when you have found it, con- 
tinue to look at it rather than the leaden gray in 
the middle. It will help you over many hard 
places." Those of us who fail to see the lining 
of silver must miss much that is good in the short 
life to be lived here. One man, who had gone all 
to smash and was certain nothing had been left 
to him but darkness, saw the bright side of life 
as the train on which he travelled emerged from 
the tunnel. Figuratively, he had been in the tun- 
nel but discovered there was no sense in staying 
there when there was a great power to pull him 
out. 

* * ♦ * 

According to the New York World conservative 
estimates by hotel men of the cost of New Year's 
Eve celebration in New York Sunday night: Number 
of persons dining in the big hotels and restaurants, 
50,000; dinners at an average cost of $5. a plate, 
$250,000; wines and liquors, $150,000; taxicabs and 
other vehicles, $75,000; cloakroom and hat check 
tips, $10,000. $510,000. These figures do not in- 
clude the money spent in Brooklyn, the Bronx and 
the smaller resturants and hotels in Manhattan. 
This stupendous amount was on what is called "The 
Great White Way," but really, as New York peo 
pie said, "The Great Hell Way.' 

* * * * 

Terrible as is the sin of New Yrok it is not all 
to the bad and thousands of dollars were spent at 
Christmas and New Year's for the relief of suffer- 
ing. Six thousand persons who otherwise would 
not have feasted were given a bounteous New Year's 
dinner by Wm. J. Wollman, a broker, on Broadway. 
Says Mr. Wollmon: "My sole motive is to help all 
those poor people to start the new year at least 
with a good square meal and to encourage them to 
keep on trying to help themselves. If by helping 
them I can encourage them to help themselves, that 
is all the return I want. I intend to do this again 
next year." Good for Mr. Wollman. Fifteen hun- 
dred poor families bless his name and God grant 
him years of prosperity to do good. 

* « * * 

The Revival 

"Wilt thou not revive us again: that thy people 
may rejoice in thee?" Ps. 85:6. 

Revivals are absolutely necessary to the contin- 
ued life of evangelical denominations. "Revivals 
occur in all religions. When one takes place a 
large number of persons who have been compara- 
tively dead or indifferent to spiritual considera- 
tions, simultaneously or in quick succession be- 
come alive to their importance, alter spiritually 
and morally, and act with exceeding zeal in con- 
verting others to their views." That is the picture 
of what revival results should show. But a meet- 
ing protracted is not always a revival. The papers 
sometimes announce that doctor so and so will 
bold a revival when there will not be one to hold. 
There can be no real revival without an effusion 
of the Holy Spirit. "Revivals," though not called 
by that name, occurred at intervals from apostolic 
times till the reformation, the revivalists being 
sometimes so unsympathetically treated that they 
left the church and formed sects, which in other 
cases, and naturally in those of the founders of 
the monastic orders, they were retained and acted 
on the church as a whole. The spiritual impulse 
which led to reformation, and the antagonistic one 
which produced or attended the rise of the Society 
of Jesus, were both revivalist. It is, however, to 
sudden increase of spiritual activity within the 
Protestant churches of the English-speaking peo- 
ples that the term revival is chiefly confined. There 
were revivals in Scotland 1625-30, and the enter- 
praise of the Wesleys and Whitefield in England 
from 1738 onward was thoroughly revivalists. There 
were revivals at Northampton in Mass., in 1734, 
and thdoughout New England in 1740-1, the Rev. 
Jonathan Edwards being the chief instrument in 
their production. A great one arose in America 
in 1857, after the financial crisis of the year. It 



spread in 1859 to Ulster, and in 1864 to Scotland 
and to parts of England. Since then various re- 
vivals have from time to time occurred, and nearly 
all denominations aim at their production. The 
means adopted are prayer for the Holy Spirit, 
meetings continued night after night, often to a 
late hour, stirring addresses from revivalists, and 
after meetings to deal with those impressed. Ul- 
timately, it is found that some of those apparently 
converted have been steadfast, others have fallen 
back, while deadness proportioned to the previous 
excitement temporarily prevails." 

The Methodist church is the product of the re- 
vival and big as it is it would die spiritually with- 
out it and without this spirit could answer no pur- 
pose in the salvation of sinners. When the dead- 
ness occurs it is time for the prayer to the Lord 
to revive us again. It is good to be in a revival. 
Good for the church to be stirred; good place for 
the back-slider to be reclaimed; good time for the 
wavering to be established; and a great place for 
the sinner to be converted; and the very place for 
all to rejoice in the Lord. 

It is not the idea of this writer that the present 
generation has lost faith in God, and revivals, but 
it is a fact that we do not have the great sweeping, 
sin destroying, and soul-converting revivals in this 
country as were characteristic of twenty-five to fif- 
ty years ago. Especially is this true as to condi- 
tions in the cities and towns where many moral 
men and society crazed women are in the lead. 
Too many are like the brother in the church who 
never failed in the experience meeting to testify 
that he didn't know exactly where he stood but 
believed most of the time he was on the fence. He 
was a good singer, member of the church for years 
before his death, considered a good man, but he 
never knew exactly where he, personally, stood. In 
1892 the writer was a visitor to Weaverville Col- 
lege and heard a fine debate by four students, two 
were Zeb and Ben Curtis, and the question was so 
ably handled by these boys that it was difficult 
to tell which side was entitled to the verdict. The 
writer was asked his opinion and declared himself 
in a quandary more or less illustrated by the story 
of the old man and his son who went out to hunt 
for a lost cow. Said the old man to the boy: "You 
go up that side and I will go up this for she is such 
a contrary old thing she is liable to be on both 
sides." So according to much evidence it looks 
as if it is a rather difficult matter for many of our 
church members to take the desired stand. Here 
is where the revival must first begin, in the church. 
What business has a Methodist woman to be con- 
nected with bridge clubs and dancing parties? 
This question of amusement is perplexing but when 
prominent women of the church indulge in all these 
things it must have a bad influence on the outsid- 
ers. Take up any secular paper and read the so- 
ciety or social departments and in every instance 
you will find many of our leading women giving or 
attending card parties and other places of question- 
able propriety considered from the viewpoint of 
church membersihp. Sometime ago a distressed 
man wrote a letter to a secular paper stating that 
his wife was at club meetings four times a week 
and he wanted to get some law to change the meet- 
ing hour of the club so his wife could get home by 
supper time and help him with the children. He 
got home from business at 6 o'clock and was 
very lonesome because she was not there. He just 
had an idea he would like to see his housekeeper 
when he got home from his business. 

The writer does not recommend any special 
method for a revival but here is a condition that 
must be met to get one of the right character: 

"If my people which are called by my name, 
shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my 
face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I 
hear from heaven, and will forgive their sins, and 
heal their land." 2 Chron. 7:14. 

Prayer, humility, seeking, turning from wicked- 
ness these will bring a big revival any time and 
anywhere. No need to say it is not needed. 

"Turn us again, O God of Hosts," and cause thy 
face to shine; and we shall be saved." 

I was waiting for a midnight train at Weldon 
and wanted the Seaboard. The train rolled in and 
I got on and soon the conductor asked for my mile- 
age and I said: "Littleton." "You are on the wrong 
train," he said. "This is the A. C. L.." He rang 
the bell and I got off of course and turned to the 
other train. Many of us in the church need to be 
turned if we are to be saved. Don't you think so? 
We are running on the wrong track. 



January 11, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



IS THE USE OF TOBACCO WRONG? 

By Rev. J. W. Clegg 

The discussion of much mooted questions like 
the above demands the exercise of the spirit of 
moderation to an unusual degree. For extremists, 
though helpful in promoting conservatism on the 
one hand or accentuating progress on the other, 
on account of limited vision and a dominating bias, 
are rarely able to declare the whole truth. No 
longer a matter of indifferent propriety and a foot- 
ball of the casuists, the subject of tobacco has be- 
come distinctively a moral question, as evidenced 
by various civil and ecclesiastical enactments in re- 
striction of its use. If these enactments are cor- 
rect in asserting by implication even that it is 
wrong for the child or the minister to use tobacco 
they establish by conclusive proof that it is wrong 
for anyone to use it. For every moral obligation 
has a universal application. 

Many conscientiously claim that there is no 
harm in tobacco since it is used by so many good 
men, men of unquestioned integrity. Their syl- 
logism would run thus: 

Many good men use tobacco. 

Good men can do nothing wrong. 

Therefore the use of tobacco is not wrong. 

The minor premise is evidently faulty and in 
consequence the conclusion is false. Men are good 
in spite of their use of tobacco and would be bet- 
ter men if they didn't use it at all; just as good 
men who indulge in improper words and tempers 
are good in spite of such indulgence and would be 
better men if they didn't indulge in them at all. 
To be satisfied with a lower good is one of the 
commonest and most insidious temptations of mod- 
ern life. Our God demands the very best possible 
always. In the words of the German proverb: 

"The good is the greatest enemy of the best." 

Some claim that tobacco possesses medicinal 
properties, acting both as a stimulant and an anaes- 
thetic. Few indeed begin and continue its use 
simply and exclusively for the benefits to be gain- 
ed. These medicinal properties are so unimportant 
that medicinal science has made little or no use 
of them. 

No one would seriously claim that tobacco is a 
food. Of animated life seeking sustenance upon the 
bosom of nature all give it a wide berth except two 
worms. "Thou worm Jacob," let it alone. Stand 
up, be a man. Thou worm of the green crawling 
variety rest secure in thy rights, enjoy the weed 
thy God hath made for thee. 

Granting all that may be claimed in the use of 
tobacco the habit must nevertheless be disapproved 
upon the following grounds: 

1. It entails a useless and not unfrequently a 
vicious expense. All legitimate property is a 
sacred trust from God designed to minister to the 
utilitarian, the aesthetic, the educational and the 
spiritual needs of mankind. The use of tobacco 
does not contribute in the least to any of these, 
but interferes directly and indirectly with them 
all. 

2. It should be abstained from on the ground 
of personal cleanliness. Not even the strongest 
advocate of its use would claim that it is a nice, 
clean and exemplary habit. If "cleanliness is next 
to Godliness," then the use of tobacco is next 
to ungodliness. 

3. Tobacco is a recognized poison, but a peculiar 
poison in thai when one gets inoculated with it he 
becomes comparatively immune from it afterwards. 
While a sufficient amount of nicotine injected into 
the system would destroy the strongest life, the 
weed is taken in such small quantities that the 
poisonous effects are largely obviated. 

4. The use of tobacco is a sacrilege. To expec- 
torate the essence of tobacco upon the floor and 
walls of the house of God and to saturate its at- 
mosphere with the fumes of nicotine would be con- 
sidered a pollution and profane to the last degree. 
How much more sacreligious is it to pollute and 
profane in the same way the most sacred of all 
God's temples — the human body. "Know ye not 
that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost?" 
1 Cor. 6:19. 

5. The use of tobacco is undesirable on the 
ground of influence. A good influence is one of the 
best endowments from God. To lessen, to weaken, 
to destroy such an influence is one of the worst 
forms of suicide. It should be borne in mind that 
the use of tobacco is offensive to the sight, the 
olfactories and the consciences of those of refined 



sensibilities. The more acute consciences of oth- 
ers demand your abstinence from this habit for 
their sakes. What an exemplar was Paul: "If 
meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh 
while the world standeth." And the Master lifts 
up a fearful warning against "offending one of 
these little ones." 

6. The use of tobacco often makes association in 
the best society unpleasant, to say the least. A 
minister of the gospel, addicted to the weed, was 
once traveling along a public road in Indiana when 
he was overtaken by a shower. Being unprepared 
for the rain he stopped at a cottage by the road- 
side, seeking shelter. A lady came to the door 
and eyeing him suspiciously said, "I don't know 
you." The good man replied, "Sister, the good 
book says, 'Be not forgetful to entertain strangers, 
for thereby some have entertained angels una- 
wares.' " 

"You needn't tell me that," she replied, no 
angel would come down here with a big quid or 
tobacco in his mouth." Whereupon she closed the 
door in his face, leaving him to the mercy of the 
storm and his own reflections. Now if it is im- 
proper for an angel of heaven to come to this 
world "with a big quid of tobacco in his mouth," 
would it not be equally unbecoming for a saint of 
earth to go to heaven in the same predicament? 
If we aspire to angelhood up there should we not 
begin to grow our angel wings down here? Surely 
we can at least meet the negative condition of such 
a growth by "abstaining from all appearance of 
evil." 1 Thess. 5:22. 

CALIFORNIA LETTER 

C. P. Moore 

When Bishop R. G. Waterhouse called the Pacif- 
ic Annual Conference to order on the 18th day 
of October, 1911, in the city of Sacramento, there 
was opened the sixty-first session of that body. The 
session was well attended and the reports of the 
preachers showed that their labors had not been 
in vain, and that there had been advancement along 
all lines during the year. The statistics show a 
total membership of 7737, who are ministered to 
by eighty-five preachers, of whom seventy-seven 
are regular and eight local. The sixty years of 
history that has been written by this conference 
is of great interest and deep significance. It shows 
how God has used our church and blessed our work 
during these years while he has called on us to la- 
bor on this great field under circumstances and 
amidst surroundings that have made it, not one of 
the most, but the most difficult of all our home 
fields. 

The work of our church on the Pacific coast can- 
not be understood from afar, nor can it be meas- 
ured by its numerical strength. The real results 
of the faithful, unfaltering ministry of our preach- 
ers and laymen will never be revealed this side of 
eternity's shore. Our church has ever stood true 
to her calling as an evangelical church, and has 
not sought to curry popular favor or patronage by 
participating in the secular or political strifes of 
the day. True to her ministry she has ever ex- 
alted the Lord Jesus Christ and sought to turn men 
from sin unto righteousness, rather than to enroll 
them on the membership roll of the church. No 
church has been more true to the real call and mis- 
sion of the church of Christ in the world than has 
our church on this coast. With this one object ever 
uppermost in their minds the preachers of South- 
ern Methodism have gone and are going up and 
down this goodly land seeking for the lost souls of 
men and women, that they might point them to the 
Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. 

The work on the coast is somewhat differently or- 
ganized from that of the east. For instance, in the 
Pacific Conference we have no large circuits as you 
have them in the east. With but few exceptions the 
number of preaching points on a California circuit 
will not exceed three. The people do not take 
kindly to monthly, nor even semi-monthly appoint- 
ments. And then again this is a state of great dis- 
tances compared with the east (although we soon 
get to think nothing of this) and the men cannot 
get around to so many places, nor so readily as they 
can with us. Our districts requre much more 
travel from the Elder than in the well settled dis- 
tricts of the eastern conferences. As an illustra- 
tion, on my trip between December 7th, and 12th, 
I visited three pastoral charges and held their Quar- 
terly Conferences together with preaching and 



communion services at each place. In doing this 
I traveled 520 miles by train and 85 miles by horse 
and buggy. This, I will say, however, is the long- 
est and hardest of my trips, but I have to make 
many others that involve from 250 to 300 miles of 
travel between Saturday morning and Monday 
night. The land area covered by the Colusa Dis- 
trict is about the same as that of the State of 
Maine. It embraces the entire valley of the Sacra- 
mento river, one of the most fertile valleys of the 
world, when properly brought under irrigation and 
cultivation. In this district we have twenty-two 
active charges, and in it there are whole counties 
in which ours is the only Methodism that is minis- 
tering to the people. Over fifty percent, of our 
members in this district are from other commun- 
ions, particularly from the Methodist Episcopal 
and the Canadian Methodist churches. This being 
true you can readily see that there is no sentiment 
of birth, or section, or politics that has any bind- 
ing ties in holding these people to our church. It 
is only because we are true to our mission, preach- 
ing the pure Gospel of Christ, that they remain 
with us. And you will also readily see why we of 
the coast deem it a most desirable if not an abso- 
lutely necessary thing, that we have a change of 
name of our church. And this change must be 
one that is more than a distinction without a dif- 
ference, one that carries with it no ambiguous 
meaning. This is a country of broad vision and 
liberal views, and The Methodist Church is the 
only name that will ever find favor on this coast, 
even should the two co-ordinate branches of Meth- 
odism be re-united as one great church. Now; 
with such a field open before us, who shall say 
that we as a church have no place in this terri- 
tory? Yea — we have a place and a work and Al- 
mighty God will hold us as recreant to our trust 
if we should falter or withdraw from one foot of 
the ground over which we have gone and which 
we have sanctified with the labors and lives of 
our brave, noble, self-sacrificing pioneer brethren. 

Of course if we are here merely to build up our 
own peculiar ecclesiasticism, make a denomination- 
al home for Southern sympathizers, who happen to 
be here or come this way, then I will agree, that 
we are out of place, for we would be merely fos- 
tering human sentiments or prejudices and not 
seeking to build up the Kingdom of Christ in the 
midst of the people. This would be wrong, yes, 
sinful, and we ought never to spend another ounce 
of energy or another cent of money on this west- 
ern work. But just so long as there are precious 
souls to be saved and large communities to be min- 
istered to in religious things we have our place in 
this field, and it behooves the church at large to 
recognize these facts and come to the support of 
this field in a way that is commensurate with the 
task in hand, and not sit around and grumble 
about the cost, and mutter about not knowing 
whether we've got any business out there or not. 

At the late conference there was launched an en- 
terprise which if it is successfully carried through 
will mean much for the future of our work on the 
coast, and do more to give us standing and enlarge 
our sphere of usefulness than anything that has 
been done for many years. To those who know, or 
have any grasp of the California situation whatever 
it is plain that the Bay cities of San Francisco, 
Oakland and Berkerley are the great central points 
from which must radiate the greatest influence and 
command the greatest prestage. With this fact in 
mind the last Conference launched an eterprise 
looking to the building of two good representative 
church buildings, one for Oakland to be known as 
the Pioneers Memorial Church and the other for 
San Francisco to be known as the Fitzgerald Me- 
morial Church. For this purpose that a sum of 
$100,000 be raised by popular subscription on the 
home field and through the church at large. Of 
this enterprise I shall have more to say at some 
future time. 

We have had some very gracious revivals in the 
conference since the new year began, some were 
union meetings and some in our own churches and 
quite a numebr of accessions are reported by the 
preachers. Pray for us that we may build up 
churches, not by a system of ecclesiastical canni- 
balism, proselyting from other communions, but 
by the means of grace given us to use whereby 
men are saved into the kingdom through repent- 
ance and faith. 



When God withholds a thing from us, he always 
gives us something better in its place. — M. W. S. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 1912 



From the Field 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Trinity church, Charlotte, gave a reception in 
honor of their pastor, Rev. T. F. Marr and wife, 
last week. Some two hundred callers were pres- 
ent. 

— Dr. Marvin Wells, a native of Shelby and son 
of Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wells, of that place, has 
moved from Mebane where he has been practicing 
medicine for some time to Cliffside, Rutherford 
county, where he will continue to practice his pro- 
fession. Dr. Wells is a nephew of Rev. W. R. 
Ware, and his wife is the daughter of Rev. R. M. 
Hoyle. 

— The new pastor of the M. E. Church, South, 
Rev. J. W. Long, preached his first sermon Sunday 
at the Methodist church. His coming has been de- 
layed by sickness of his aged mother, and also by 
his personal illness. He made a good impression 
upon his hearers, and we bespeak for him and the 
church a good work in the town for the ensuing 
year. He comes to us with the best of cheer, and 
the people will accord him a hearty welcome. We 
are fortunate in securing the services of such a 
capable, good, and efficient worker as he has the 
reputation of being. — Andrews Sun. 

— : Mr J. B. Moseley, a member of Centenary 
church, Winston-Salem, and a brother of Mr. B. G. 
Moseley, of Danville, Va., died very suddenly "at 
his home on Thursday morning at 12:50 
o'clock. Mr. Moseley was held in high esteem by 
all who knew him. He was born in Bucking- 
ham county, Va., sixty-seven years ago. He is sur- 
vived by two sisters who lived with him, also by 
two brothers, Mr. Robert D. Moseley, of Winston- 
Salem, and Mr. E. G. Moselev, of Danville. The 
funeral was conducted on Friday morning by Rev. 
E. L. Bain, the pastor, and the remains were -in- 
terred in Green Hill cemetery at Danville on Fri- 
day afternoon. The Advocate joins in expressions 
of sympathy for the bereaved ones. 

— On December 24th Mr. Moses Stroup, of the 
Concord section, while reading the paper thought 
he heard a rap at his door, but being quite feeble, 
Mr. Stroup did not respond immediately, and very 
soon a negro man, Galloway by name, uninvited 
entered the room ostensibly to get Mr. Stroup to 
give him two half dollars for a whole, that he might 
pay a debt of fifty cents to another negro on the 
place. Mr. Stroup arose and went to a window to 
more clearly see to give him the change. The ne- 
gro who bad followed snatched the purse from Mr. 
Stroup's hard and made a hasty retreat. He was 
later captured at a corn shucking and the purse 
that at first contained fifteen or eighteen dollars 
was recovered together with about half the money. 
— Gastonia Gazette. 

Mr. Stroup is a prominent Methodist Layman, 
well known to many Advocate readprs. This should 
put all on their guard about handling money in the 
presence of negroes. 



grandchildren and great grandchildren. — Morgan- 
ton News-Herald. 



BETHEL AND BIG LICK 

I will write a few lines to let the people know 
where we are this year. The Bishop sent us back 
to the same field. When the people heard 
that we had returned they began pounding and 
have not stopped yet. Some one comes every few 
days with a fresh supply. This is one of the lar- 
gest fields in the Salisbury District, one church in 
Cabarrus and four in Stanley. There is plenty of 
work to do but no charge has any better people to 
serve than we have and with the proper cultivation 
this -will soon be one of the best circuits. I am plan- 
ning my work to get my Conference course out of 
my way so that I may be free to launch out into 
the field and gather a good harvest of souls this 
fall. 

Married, Dec. 20th, Mr. C. M. Barbee and Miss 
Ozelle Howell. 

December 21st, Mr. Charles W. Barrino and Miss 
Atha Tucker. 

R. K. Brady. 



FROM CONCORD 



Rev. W. T. Albright, writing to the Concord 
Times, says: 

"Ever since coming to Concord Circuit in Novem- 
ber there has been an almost continuous stream of 
good things coming to the parsonage. Chickens, 
eggs, butter, fresh meat, canned fruit — these are 
among the things that gladden the hearts of the 
preacher and his family. But on New Year's Day 
the climax came. Brother Shinn brought a large 
fat goose for dinner, and just when it was ready 
Brother Arthur Winecoff and Brother Ritchie drove 
into the lot with two well loaded wagons — corn, 
chickens, fruit — well, Olivet knows how to pound 
a preacher, and we have much goods laid up for 
many days, and there is included in our stock a 
fine fat 'possum. 

For all these things we are very thankful and 
we pray God's richest blessings upon every one 
who has so kindly remembered us. 



HELTON CIRCUIT 



The Death Angel visited this community last Fri- 
day, Dec. 29, and claimed for its victim Mrs. Johan- 
nah Penington. She was 91 years, 1 month and 
28 days old. She was an acceptable member of 
the Methodist church, South, over 52 years. She 
leaves one son and two daughters to mourn her 
death. 

Mr. Jim Perkins is and has been for sometime 
very sick, but it is hoped that he will recover. A 
special meeting is in progress at present in the 
Helton Methodist church. We respectfully solicit 
the prayers and co-operation of every Christian 
in this ^community to join with us and blend with 
ours your efforts in saving souls. 

Fraternally, 

J. E. McSwain, P. C. 



DEATH OF MR. C. D. GILES 

After an illness of several weeks Mr. C. D. Giles, 
of LinviTe township, passed into the great beyond 
earlv Friday morning, Dec. 29th, and was buried at 
Linville Methodist church on Saturday, the 30th, 
at 2 p. m., a large number of relatives and friends 
attending. Rev. Albert Sherrill, deceased's pastor, 
conducted the funeral. 

Mr. Giles was 85 years of age on Christmas day, 
1911, and was one of the landmarks of the county. 
Who did not know "Uncle Kip?" as he was famili- 
arly called. He was one of the best known, most 
substantial men of the county. His word was his 
bond and he leaves to his posterity the heritageof 
not only a good name but a good estate honestly 
made to be handed to his children, all of whom 
have proven unrieht, good citizens. He was a pil- 
lar in the Methodist church for years and passed 
peacefully away to his "rest under the shade of 
the trees." 

There were twelve children bv his marriage to 
Miss Delphia Winters, a sister of the late Marcus 
Winters, seven of whom survive. The wife died 
several years ago. The surviving children are Rev. 
M. D., W. N., and A. H. Giles, and Mrs. Hattie Go- 
forth, Mrs. Lizzie Beck, Mrs. Saphronia Beck and 
Mrs. Mamie Erwin, besides more than a hundred 



THAT TEMPERANCE REPORT AND DELE- 
GATES EXPENSES TO THE WASHING- 
TON MEETING 

As chairman of the committee on Temperance, 
I feel it my duty to write something on the above 
heading. The discussion of the report on Temper- 
ance in the Conference was so warm and lengthy 
that it caused the neglect of an important item, that 
of providing for the expenses of our delegates to 
the Washington convention, and as it was neglect- 
ed, then, I suggest that all of us take a collection 
on temperance day which is the second Sunday in 
April, and send to the treasurer of the Board of 
Missions and let him refund the expenses of all 
the delegates who attended the Washington Con- 
vention and what is left after these expenses have 
been met shall go to Rev. R. L. Davis for the League 
work. And if none of the delegates attended, let 
us take the collection and send it all to Brother 
Davis, for we certainly ought to stand by him and 
the Anti-Saloon League for the work of the League 
is not done but just well begun. If we are tem- 
perance people let us be consistent and stand for it 
in every way, cut out the paper that advertises 
whiskey and .furnish means to outlaw the demand 
of strong drink. 

Yours in Him, 
Mooresville, N. C. B, Myers. 



THE M. E. PEOPLE AT RANDLEMAN POUND 
THEIR PASTOR 

'Twas just before Christmas, 
And around through the house, 
The inmates were moving 
As still as a mouse. 

When all of a sudden, 
There arose such a clatter, 
The preacher looked up to 
See what was the matter. 

Saint Nich', in the person 
Of a dozen and more, 
Came filing right through 
The dining room door. 

They laid down their presents 
Many meats, a cut of steak, 
With a sack of flour, and 
A Christmas cake. 

And numerous bundles 
Of real "goodies" galore — 
They filled the table, 
And part of the floor. 

The "pounding" was over, 
And the people had gone; 
The family surveyed, 
And commented long. 

With heartfelt gratitude, 
The pastor oft spoke, 
"Wasn't this thoughtful 
And kind of the folk?" 

Rosamond Larbacher Taylor. 



OLD BOOKS IN A NEW DRESS 

Sometime ago I got hold of a very rare old set of 
Clarke's Commentary. It was published by T. Ma- 
son and G. Lane and was printed in New York in 
1837 by James Collard. A New York Methodist 
preacher bought it the same year and I suppose it 
has been doing service ever since. It was still in 
good condition when I got it from a member of our 
Conference last year, except that the binding of 
two of the volumes had broken on the back. I 
sent these two volumes to our Advocate office at 
Greensboro three weeks ago and they came back to 
me just a little while ago dressed up in a neat new 
suit of sheepskin, which has every look of useful- 
ness and durability. They look as if they belonged 
to a different generation from the other four, that 
stand beside them. These latter are dressed in 
old coats that show signs of much wear, being 
scratched and torn at the top. These old volumes 
on account of the length of their service, not to 
mention the merit of their contnets, deserve a new 
dress, too. I have a mind to give them one. I want 
to see them standing up there in their place as 
beautifully arranged as their comrades. A new 
dress would sit well on them, for while they have 
already passed their three score and ten years, 
they still wear their youth and are as fresh and 
up-to-date as the children of a later generation. 
What a great commentary it is! How I wish I 
had been using it for the past ten years. 



MOORESVILLE CIRCUIT 



We have made a start in our work on the Moores- 
ville Circuit. Were warmly welcomed for a second 
year and are going to work with high courage and 
good will. We are having a day in the week, either 
Saturday or Monday for Church Conference in the 
forenoon and stewards' meeting in the afternoon. 
At these conferences we elect our missionary com- 
mittee an dare planning, as we believe wisely and 
well, for our year's work. McKendrees Chapel is 
baking quite an interest in furnishing the parson- 
age, and further fitting it for the greatest comfort 
for their pastor and his family. We have a true 
and loyal people to serve and are very much in 
love with them and there are constant manifesta- 
tions of their love to us. We organized an Ep- 
worth League just before Conference at Triplett 
which is doing good work. I attended a public 
literary meeting on' Wednesday evening after 
Christmas which was good indeed. Our League at 
Centenary is doing good work. We are taking up 
the interest of the Advocate in our church confer- 
ences and hope to get a good list of subscribers 
this year. 

E. Myers 

Mooresville, N. C. 



January 11, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



REV. WALTER O. RUDISILL 

Walter O. Rudisill, son of John C. and Alice Rudi- 
sill, of Lincoln county, N. C, was born May 29, 
1911. 

When quite a young man Brother Rudisill fbelt 
moved to enter the high and holy calling of the 
ministry; and realizing that a call to the ministry 
meant a call to equip himself the best possible for 
that work, he entered Trinity College in 1898, where 
he pursued his studies for three years. The writer 
of this sketch was a college mate of his and can 
say that he was held in the very highest esteem 
by the college community, and his work in the 
class room and in the society halls were of a high 
order. 

After completing his junior year in college he 
accepted the principalship of Belwood Institute 
where he did excellent and most satisfactory work 
as a teacher. 

On August 2, 1904, Brother Rudisill was happily 
married to Miss Angie Ware of King's Mountain, 
N. C. Shortly after his marriage he accepted an 
appointment to Clarksbury Circuit where he served 
until the assembling of the Annual Conference at 
Greensboro in 1905. He joined the Western North 
Carolina Conference that year. He served the fol- 
lowing appointments. Maiden Circuit, two years; 
Chadwick and Seversville, one year; Boone Circuit, 
one year. He was then appointed a student to 
Vanderbilt University, but he soon thereafter ac- 
cepted the appointment to LaFoyette St., Shelby, 
N. C. 

It was while serving as pastor at the latter place 
that his health gave way. He was then transferred 
to the Los Angeles Conference and was stationed 
at Temple, Arazona. While at this place there was 
some indications of his being restored to health, 
but Brother Rudisill felt that he couldn't give up 
his work. It was in February, 1911, if I mistake 
r.ot, he had made careful preparation to preach a 
special sermon on missions. Sunday morning came 
and found him not so well as he had been, but a 
large congregation gathered, and the preacher 
preached his sermon with unusual force and pow- 
er. He went home and was prostrated with a high 
fever. Brother Rudisill was really never able to 
preach again. 

Within a few months he returned to North Caro- 
lina, being transferred to the Western North Caro- 
lina Conference. He, with his faithful and devoted 
wife, spent several months in Asheville, hoping 
that he might regain his health. All hope of recov- 
ery being given up he was taken to his father's 
home where he died just a few days before the 
assembling of the Annual Conference which he had 
been hoping to attend. 

Mr. Rudisill bore his affliction without a word of 
complaint. He was a diligent student, a deep 
thinker, a strong and forceful preacher. He delight- 
ed in preaching the Gospel, which was the ambition 
of his life. Just before his death he gave instruc- 
tions that his library be donated to Weaverville 
College. May this gift, with the remembrance of his 
life and ambition, be an inspiration to another to 
take up the noble work that he regretted so much 
to lay aside. 

M. B. Clegg. 



RUTH ER FOR DTON 

No soner had appointments been read at States- 
ville than congratulations began to shower upon 
this preacher as one of the peculiarly fortunate 
ones. After a little more than a month's residence 
we are convinced that the people of the Ruther- 
fordton charge deserve all the "accusations" that 
have been "brought against them and more. 

We left Greensboro on the morning of Nov. 28, 
and after an all day trip by way of Blacksburg, 
having missed our train at Salisbury by only ten 
minutes, we reached Rutherfordton about 9:45. The 
parsonage was comfortable, and, no little to our 
surprise, considering the lateness of the hour, the 
house was full of people who vied with each other 
in making the new preacher and his family com- 
fortable. It was a cold night, but the welcome was 
enough to take the edge off zero temperature. The 
good ladies had a hot supper for us, and, notwith- 
standing the fact that we had three meals that day, 
we did justice to it. An investigation showed that 
the pounders had got in their work, and we thought 
they had done it well, but we soon found that this 
was only the first installment. We arrived on 
Thanksgiving eve and every day since has been a 
thanksgiving day. Who could not help loving such 



a kind and generous people? God bless them and 
help us to lead them to a great spiritual feast this 
year. 

Our first quarterly conference was almost rained 
out on Dec. 23, but our Presiding Elder was not. 
He preached a great sermon for us on Christmas 
eve. His subject was the Atonement. In addition 
to that he contributed to the success of our Christ- 
mas exercises by writing a very appropriate reci- 
tation. 

The unfinished business of the quarterly confer- 
ence was completed at a stewards meeting held last 
Monday at the parsonage. All of the out-of-town 
churches were well represented in spite of axle-deep 
mud. The spirit of these stewards is simply a re- 
flection of the spirit of the membership of their 
churches. Good congregations and a most respect- 
ful hearing of the message has been the rule at all 
appointments. The homes of the people have been 
thrown open for our reception, and there are few 
greater pleasures than to accept as many as pos- 
sible of the many invitations that come. 

Robert E. Hunt. 



FROM CHERRYVILLE TO McADENVI LLE 

The shortest and least expensive move I have 
ever made in my itinerant life of forty years. Only 
twenty miles — "a bee line." A little farther in dis- 
tance, but as short or shorter in time on the Macad- 
am road by way of Bessemer City and Gastonia — 
a drive with horse and buggy of little over three 
hours. I made the move with all my household 
goods in less than six hours. That much for good 
roads, running close by the parsonage doors at 
each end of the line. 

I took possession of the parsonage at McAdenville 
on Wednesday, November 22nd, and occupied the 
pqulpit on the fourth Sunday morning and evening. 
Have preached every Sunday morning and evening 
since, except on the evening of the third Sunday in 
December, the occasion of our first quarterly meet- 
ing, when Dr. S. B. Turrentine, our Presiding El- 
der, preached for us. 

I have had a kind reception and cordial welcome 
by the congregation and community, and have en- 
tered upon my work with encouraging hopes of a 
good year. 

There are two leading churches here — the Metho- 
dist and Baptist, with only one resident pastor. The 
Baptists appear to have pre-empted this country, 
and have the larger membership and congregation. 
But the Methodists have a good footing and a good 
church, centrally located, and there is an opening 
for them to do a good work which I believe they 
are trying to do. The membership is rather small, 
but we have a good number of intelligent and loyal 
people, and we are hoping for better things this 
year. 

This is one time in a pastorate of seven years 
that I know exactly where I am. Heretofore my 
charges have embraced parts of two or three coun- 
ties and very often I would be puzzled to determine 
my exact whereabouts. But now, I have one church, 
a station, and I itinerate in a limited circle in and 
around McAdenville, which is nestled among the 
hills on both sides of the South Fork River, spann- 
ed by a steel bridge, seven miles west of the Cataw- 
ba, altogether in Gaston county. And yet when the 
sun is not shining I have difficulty in locating the 
cardinal points. The sun does not appear to rise 
and set at the accustomed places, and the trains 
seem to run the wrong way. 

McAdenville is a mill town with a population of 
1,500 or more including the suburbs outside of the 
corporation. It is situated on the National High- 
way from New York to Atlanta, a mile and a half 
from the main line of the Southern Railway. But 
it has a railway of its own for the transportation 
of its cotton and manufactured goods with passen- 
gers also. It is unique, in that its cars are pulled 
by neither steam nor ele'ctricity. They are drawn 
by mule power one way and by gravitation the 
other. 

There are three factories here — two spinning and 
one weaving — doing a large business in the way of 
spinning and manufacturing plaids, shirtings, out- 
ings, cotton flannels etc. There appears to be no 
conflict between labor and capital. No strike. The 
managers have adopted the policy of cutting out a 
few holidays for the Christmas season, and treating 
the families of the operatives with turkeys for the 
Christmas dinner. Perhaps two hundred of these 
fowls are distributed among them every year when 
they can be bought on the market. The Methodist 



pastors share in these annual treats. The present 
occupant was the recipient of a fine young gobbler 
and it goes without saying that we fared sumptu- 
ously this Christmas and enjoyed it very much. 

They have good common school facilities. Three 
teachers are employed for eight months in the year. 
The Company pays $200.00 and the State pays the 
balance for their support. Tuition free. 

Gaston is a great county — one of the best in the 
State. Formerly it was noted for its liquor-mak- 
ing and dissipation. But the still houses have all 
disappeared, and it is now noted for its good roads, 
cotton factories, growing towns and Christian 
churches. There are more factories and more cotton 
spun and manufactured into various fabrics in 
Gaston county than any county in the State, or in 
the country at large. 

We have just passed through the happy Christmas 
festivities, and out of the old into the New Year, 
1912. This writing is on the morning of the New 
Year, and we congratulate ourselves on the peace- 
ful and oderly keeping of Christmas. There was 
less dissipation and fewer cases of intoxication 
than ever known before. James Willson. 

McAdenville, N. C. 



TO OUR CHURCH PEOPLE 

If you receive a sample copy of the Advocate 
this is an invitation to subscribe. We are sending 
out many samples, and we trust many will decide 
to send in their subscriptions at once. Send money 
direct to us or hand to you pastor. 

OUR ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

Report of new subscribers and renewals sent in 
by pastors to date, January 9th. 



Rev. G. D. Herman 1 1 

Rev. W. L. Sherrill 5 

Total — § £S» 1 

Franklin District 

Rev. J. F. Starnes 4 

Total — 4 

Greensboro Distric* 

Rev. S. T. Barber 1 

Rev. J. T. Stover 4 

Rev. A. L. Aycock 1 

Total — 5 — 1 

Morganion District 

Rev. D. S. Richardson 1 

Rev! R. E. Hunt 1 

Total .... — 1 — 1 

Mount Airy District 

Rev. Z. V. Johnson 2 

Total — 2 

North Wilkesboro District 

Rev. J. E. McSwain 1 

Total — 1 

Salisbury District 

Rev. J. W. Clegg 1 

Rev. W. T. Albright 1 

Total — 1 — 1 

Shelby Dist'ict 

Rev. J. H. Robertson 1 

Total — 1 

Statesviile District 

Rev E. Myers 1 

Rev. J. P. Davis 1 

Rev. T. E. Wagg 1 

Rev. C. M. Pickens 1 

Rev. J. W. Kennedy 1 

Rev. E. E. Yates 1 

Total — 4 — 2 

Waynes- ilie Disti ict 

Rev. J. H. Green 2 

Total — 2 

Winston District 

Rev. L. T. Hendren 1 

Rev. J. T. Ratledge 2 3 

Total .—3 — 3 

Grand total —22 — 16 



— Rev. P. C. Battle, who spent th epast summer 
in the vicinity of Black Mountain, we are glad to 
learn has greatly improved in health, and is now 
doing regular work as pastor of the Hot Springs 
Circuit. He moved his family to Swannanoa early 
in the fall where his children have the benefit of 
a good school. Brother Battle's friends will be 
pleased to learn that the family, is so comfortably 
situated. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 19 



Foreign Mission Department 

Mrs. D. M. Litaker, Press Superintendent, Hickory, N. C. 



i 



THE WEAVERS 

By Eleanor Duncan Woods 

In the long, low Eastern workroom 

The Weavers wove apace, 
Each on his separate pattern, 

Each in his cwn set place: 
Threads of the sunset's splendor 

In their sinewy fingers whirled, 
Under their hands, triumphant, 

Grew the Work of the World. 

Only one worked in silence, 

Only one head bent low — 
The best and blithest workman 

Who had welcomed the morning's 
glow; 

But the threads in his hands had faded, 

Tarnished the gold and green, 
And the work that should have crown- 
ed him, 

Foredoomed, grew poor and mean. 

Wondering, the others watched him; 

"Put by, put by," quoth they; 
"You shame your skill by such labor; 

Rest from the loom today." 
But he bent to his work in silence, 

Save when the whisper rose, 
"Surely the Master set the task, 

And surely the Master knows." 

In bitter pain and heartbreak 
He wove till his work was done, 

And the Master of all the Weavers 
Came at the set of sun; 

Then, as the others thronged him, 
Showing their patterns rare, 

The Master turned to him who had 
failed 

And laid a hand on his hair. 

"Well done, well done, my Weavers, 
And rich shall your guerdons be! 

But of all your beauteous patterns 
This one best pleaseth me; 

For the Red of Courage, the Gold of 
Faith 

Are woven whene'er a man 
Looks in the face of Failure 
And does the best that he can." 



The Japan Methodist Church closed 
its first quadrennium as a separate 
organization with the General Con- 
ference session of some two months 
ago. The present number of mem- 
bers, 14,569, shows a substantial gain, 
and more encouraging still was the 
report of a Sunday school membership 
of 25,980. In this is the promise of 
the growing in'uence of Methodism in 
that kingdom. — Nashville Advocate. 



TIMELY ADVICE 

If you are impatient, sit down quiet- 
ly and talk with Job. 

If you are just a little headstrong, 
see Moses. 

If you are getting weak-kneed, take 
a good look at Elijah. 

If there is no song in your heart, 
listen to David. 

If you are a policy man, read Daniel. 

If you are getting sordid, spend a 
while with Isaiah. 

n you feel chilly, get the beloved 
disciple to put his arms around you 

If your faith is below par, read Paul 

If you are getting lazy, watch James 

If you are losing sight of the future 
climb up the stairs of revelation and 
get a glimpse o" the promised land.— 
Christian Workers' Magazine. 



MIDWINTER BIBLE AND MISSION- 
ARY CONFERENCE 

As our paper goes to press, the Mid- 
winter, Bible and Missionary Confer- 
ence is in session at the Methodist 
Training School, Nashville. A good 
number of Conference Missionary Sec- 
retaries, pastors and presiding elders 
are here from the various Conferences 
and a most interesting and profitable 
session is being held. For the ses- 
sions through Monday of this week, 
the principal speakers have been 



Dr. E. Y. Mullins, of the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Dr. F. 
M. Thomas, Louisville, Ky.; Rev. John 
S. Jenkins, Atlanta, Ga.; Rev. J. W. 
Perry, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Dr. J. S. 
French, Rev. W. B. Ricks, Dr. John 
A. Kern, Prof. H. B. Carre, Prof. J. L. 
Cuninggim, Dr. John M. Moore, and 
Rev. J. M. Culbreth, of Nashville; 
Rev. S. E. Hager, of Japan; and Rev. 
M. Dickie, of Brazil. In connection 
with the Institute is being held a 
Workers' Conference under the aus- 
pices of the Womans' Missionary 
Council, and a good number of our 
deaconesses and other home mission 
workers are in attendance. We will 
have in our next issue an account of 
the interesting Conference now in ses- 
sion. — Nashville Advocate. 



GOOD RESOLUTIONS 

An exchange belittles the idea of 
good resolutions for the new year, and 
gives a pen picture of "the man who 
alway swalks breast forward," or, in 
other words, always does his best and 
does not need resolutions to do better. 
Incidentally it says that "hell is pav- 
ed with good intentions." 

We have heard this before, but we 
do not believe it. We say, rather, 
that the way to heaven is paved with 
good intentions; or, rather, that he 
who walks it is shod with good inten- 
tions. Likewise he is clothed with 
humility. 

He who walks so confidently and is 
so perfect that he needs no resolutions 
to improve is marching for a fall. So 
the Pharisee marched into the temple. 
He could recite his virtues and need- 
ed no confessions or improvement. 
The poor sinner who cried for mercy 
was on safer ground than he. 

Hell is not paved with intentions to 
seek the divine mercy. The publi- 
can's intention or resolution to do 
this found favor with the Master. It 
is not paved with intentions to accept 
the Savior or with resolutions to live 
a true, loyal Christian life or to be 
Jiligent in Christian service. 

The man who makes no resolutions 
makes no improvements. Hell is pav- 
■?d, not with intentions, but with fail- 
ares; not with promises, but with un- 
'aithfulness. 

Good resolutions are a good thing. 
The more one makes of them, the bet- 
ter; and the beginning of the year is 
a good time for them A better time 
T s right now. Let one say as he reads 
this: "I intend to be a Christian. I 
ntend to be a better man in the fam- 
ily, Church, and State, and in my se- 
cret life than I have been." Then 
let him pray the prayer of the. publi- 
can, "God be merciful to me, a sinner," 
ind add a petition for God's help to do 
God's will. — Herald and Presbyter. 



because the women shall have great 
faith, effectual prayer, and full con- 
secration to God and the extension of 
his kingdom. 



FROM MISS GIBSON'S PEN 

The year begins; and all its pages 
^re as blank as the silent years of the 
'ife of Jesus Christ. The year is full 
of gracious opportunities and won- 
irous possibilities if we but live in a 
?reat spirit that we may be ready to 
neet great occasions. This is true of 
our individual life, of the life of an in- 
stitution, and of a Christian organiza- 
tion. 

The Woman's Missionary Council 
has projected great advancement in 
1912. Its plans include every woman, 
interested or Indifferent, who is a 
member of our Church; and they ex- 
tend to every land in which the 
Board of Missions has work. There 
! s no time or place for faltering or 
doubt. In the new year now in its 
lawn may every woman serve in the 
newness of spirit, so that, great as 
the triumphant Jubilee of 1911 has 
been, the year succeeding may excel 



A SUGGESTION 

If all the Church women of a town 
would agree to hold their meetings 
on the same afternoon, it would solve 
many problems, or instance, no one 
would forget the day of meeting; there 
would be fewer interruptions, such as 
callers, social events, etc.; and there 
would be strength in the realization 
of the numbers gathered together for 
prayer and missionary work that day. 
In large cities this may not be so easy, 
but much could be done toward the 
adoption of such a plan. In some dis- 
tricts the same afternoon is used by 
all Methodist women for the weekly 
meetings, and many women have 
felt strength in unity. In one whole 
Conference this is done successfully. — 
Yearbook, 1912. 



NEW PUBLICATIONS NOW READY 

Miss Ellasue Wagner's second book 
of Korean stories, "Poqjumie," will 
be welcomed heartily by all readers 
of "Kim Su Bang and Other Stories." 
It will prove of even greater interest 
to those who prefer the one long story 
to a collection of short ones. It is 
tastefully and attractively bound. 
Send orders to Board of Missions, and 
enclose fifty cents. 

'The Yearbooks for Adult and 
Young Peoples' Auxiliaries for 1912" 
are now ready for use. A sufficient 
supply has been sent to each Confer- 
ence to furnish every auxiliary with 
one copy. A reserve is kept at the 
Publishing House, where they may be 
had at five cents each or thirty-five 
cents a dozen. 

"Helps for Missionary Societies" 
may be ordered at the same price. 

A list of the publications of the Mis- 
sion Board may be had free upon ap- 
plication. 



A NEW DEPARTMENT— THE BU- 
REAU OF LITERATURE 

The literature of the Mission Board, 
including that of the Woman's mis- 
sionary Council, has been gathered 
into one department to be known as 
the Bureau of Literature. This de- 
partment will make a specialty of sup- 
plying leaflets for distribution, helps 
for missionary programs, information 
on missionary topics, etc. It is to be 
under the direction of the Editorial 
Secretary of the Board of Missions. 
All orders or inquiries concerning lit- 
erature should be addressed to Miss 
Maggie Chesnutt, Bureau of Litera- 
ture, Methodist Publishing House, 
Nashville, Tenn. 



THE CALL FOR ADVANCE 

W. W. Pinson 

There is a well-nigh universal con- 
viction that the hour has struck for 
a missionary advance all along the 
line. The fields are white, the needs 
are urgent, the Church is awaking. 
By every token God is saying to the 
leaders: "Command the people that 
they go forward." 

After much thought and prayer and 
counsel a plan has been wrought 
for an advance movement in the 
whole church. It is not to be a fract- 
ional, local, nor spasmodic movement, 
but an effort to bring the whole 
Church face to face with the obliga- 
tion to give the gospel to the whole 
world. We shall, first of all, aim at 
four results: to set the facts of our 
missionary situation squarely before 
our people; to stir their hearts and 
consciences with the opportunity and 
obligation of the hour; to secure better 
organization and more effective meth- 
ods; and to enlist and train mission- 
ary leaders. 

Forces to be' Used 

The missionary Secretaries, bath 
women and men, have combined on 



this plan. Drs. McMurry and Ai 
erson, of the Board of Church Ext< 
sion and Education, will coopera 
Dr. Reid and his splendid force 
lay leaders will be in line. Return 
missionaries will be enlisted, and Cc 
ference Missionary Secretaries, bo 
men and women, will be strong allii 
In addition to specially adapted 1 
erature, we shall count among o 
strongest agencies the whole fam 
of Advocates They never fail us 
such a crisis. 

The Plan of Campaign 

We purpose to hold institutes in 
many centers as possible during t 
first four months of 1912. 

These will be arranged for befo 
hand and local arrangements plann 
for the largest results. 

The force of speakers and worke 
at command will be divided into grou 
suitably made up for the fullest a 
most forcible presentation of t 
cause. These several groups will cc 
duct institutes in various centers 
the same time. 

At the close of these institutes t 
workers will scatter, with availat 
local help, throughout the district a 
visit every church in the distri 
where meetings have been arrang 
for beforehand by the pastors. 

These groups of workers cann 
reach the entire Church the prese 
year. But a plan for carrying this i 
vance effectively into each conferen 
has been provided, and will be ft 
nished to those who desire it. 

Objectives 

The circulation of literature, inch 
ing the Missionary Voice. 

The organization of study classe! 

Making the Sunday School missic 
ary according to Discipline. 

The organization of new auxiliari 
of the Woman's Missionary Societi 
and the increase of membership 
those now existing. 

The organization and training 
missionary committees. 

Leading up to Every-Member Ci 
vass, to be conducted simultaneqais 
in towns and cities and througnc 
whole districts wherever possible. 

The encouragement and aid of 
worth Leagues in their missiona 
work, and especially in this great 
ban Mission Special. 

Financial Goal 

For the general work a voluntj 
goal representing the need and opp 
tunity of the fields and the ability 
the Church rather than the wholly 
adequate assessment. The slogan 
an average of two dollars per meml 
that has been adopted by the laym 
and by the Board is still neither 
reasonable nor extravagant. To pn 
this standard and move toward and 
it, leaving each Church to approximi 
it or exceed it as faith and abil 
may warrant will be our constant 
ancial aim. Collections will not 
taken during the institutes. 

Many Annual Conferences hi 
adopted the surplus plan, and hi 
set for themselves a high standard 
advance. These standards will be 
hered to and pressed in these inst: 
tes. The women have adopted as th 
motto: "Double our membersh 
double our offerings." This goal 
be kept to the front for their wort 

This program cannot be carried 
without prayer, and ought net to 
if it could. Hence we request 
Churches to set apart Thursday, 
uary 11, 1912, as a day of humiliati 
fasting and prayer. Let there be 
humbling of heart and a confession 
disobedience and a universal cry 
a fresh illumination and deepened c 
viction in this crucial hour. 

Preliminary Conference 

Those who will take part in 
movement and help either locally 
generally have been called to meet 
conference and final planning at 
Methodist Training School during 
Workers' Conference and Midwir 
Institute on Wednesday, January 
1912. 



January 11, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Home Mission Department 

Conducted by Mrs. W. L. Nicholson 



THE BEAUTY OF HOLINESS 

I love thy skies, thy sunny misis, 
Thy fields, thy mountains hoar, 

Thy wind that bloweth where it lists; 
Thy will, I love it more. 

I love thy hidden truth to seek 
All round, in sea, or shore; 

The arts whereby like gods we speak; 
Thy will to me is more. 

I love thy men and women Lord, 

The children round thy door, 
Calm thoughts that inward strength 
afford; 

Thy will, O Lord, is more. 

But when thy will my life shall hold, 

Thine to the very core, 
The world which that same will did 
mold 

I shall love ten times more. 

— George MacDonald. 



When the so-called Christian world 
does really "love the men and women, 
Lord" then will love manifest itself 
not only in relieving oppression and 
distress but in teaching these thy 
children. 



A CALL FOR FASTING AND PRAY- 
ER 

January 11, 1912, the Southern 
Methodist Church is called to definite 
prayer for the evangelization of the 
heathen world and the deeper Chris- 
tianization of those nations that we 
call Christian. Let every woman re- 
member to fast and pray that God 
may work a miracle in the Church 
this year, 1912, a miracle of quicken- 
ing every member to a sense of per- 
sonal obligation and privilege that she 
has in calling men to salvation. 



THE YOUNG CHRISTIAN WORKER 

In the last quarter's report of the 
home department, a record of the 
number of subscribers to the Young 
Christian Worker was conspicuously 
absent. This calls to our attention 
the fact that this excellent paper is 
now the organ of home department as 
well as the foreign; and the monthly 
programs for children's meetings are 
to be found nowhere else. There are 
copies taken among the juniors of the 
home department I know; but the 
great importance of having it widely 
circulated has not been sufficiently 
recognized. Miss Annie Maria Barnes, 
of Summerville, is the efficient editor 
but subscriptions should be sent Miss 
Lena Freeman, 810 Broadway, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. Price, twenty-five cents 
a year, no club rates. 



No more important work is under- 
taken by the Woman's Missionary 
Council than the school work, wheth- 
er that in foreign lands or within our 
own country. This week we print 
with joy and pride two items taken 
from the December Bulletin relative 
to the Sue Bennett School. 



GLAD NEWS FROM SUE BENNETT 
SCHOOL 

A letter, dated October 21, 1911, 
from our mountain school in London, 
ky., says: 

"I want to tell you that we began 
special services the Tuesday before 
last and the Lord was with us from 
the first. I am sure the Week of 
Prayer had brought us help. There 
was great conviction, and this week 
souls began to be saved, seven before 
yesterday. Then yesterday we had 
the most blessed day I ever saw here 
— about sixty were converted. We had 
no lessons from 9:40 a. m., but the 
work went on steadily until 3 o'clock. 
Brother Cheapson was converted and 
his father came up to the evening 



prayer-meeting so happy, so gracious. 
The teachers have been perfectly unit- 
ed and sympathetic and helpful. 

"Tomorrow the four churches (M. E. 
Church, Baptist, Christian and ours) 
begin a meeting together. Isn't that 
fine? If you want a refreshing I think 
you had better come." 



A MODEL SCHOOL 

The Federation of Woman's Clubs 
of Kentucky offered last year a prize 
of eight hundred dollars to the moun- 
tain school which came nearest touch- 
ing a model standard. This effort on 
the part of the women of the State 
to raise the standard of small moun- 
tain schools as well as increase the 
number met with hearty appreciation 
and earnest effort on the part of those 
who were conducting various small 
schools in the mountain sections. The 
prize was awarded to the school con- 
ducted by Miss Scoville, who is a grad- 
uate of the Sue Bennett School. This 
is some of the fruits of the effort of 
the women of the Southern Methodist 
Church to better the condition of 
mountain people. 



The following paper read by Mrs. 
Buckner on the joint meeting of the 
Asheville and Waynesville Districts 
in Waynesville was so fine that all 
who heard it wished a copy and, at the 
request of Mrs. R. W. Barber of South 
Carolina, it was seht to me for publi- 
cation. It should have a wide read- 
ing. — Editor. 



OUR SCHOOLS AND RESCUE WORK 

We who claim to be Christians 
must remember whatever we do, think 
or say in the spirit of the true service 
to our Lord is only the fulfillment 
and consummation of a work already 
begun by him, and this is a surety for 
its final success. 

There is not a kindly word spoken 
nor act performed of cheer, of com- 
fort, of mental or spiritual awakening 
for another that had not its origin 
in Christ; for truly "in Him we live, 
move and have our being" and, with- 
out Him we can do nothing. 

Jesus began to do and to teach 
while in the form of a man on earth, 
illustrating his teaching by his actions, 
by his daily commonplace life, more 
frequently than by the wonderful mir- 
acles that arrested the attention of 
all, and invested his personality with 
the peculiar charm of a perplexing 
mystery. His benign purpose was 
then, as it is now, for this work to be 
continued after his death. His resur- 
rection and ascension were the only 
conditions making this possible. There 
are no dividing lines between then 
and now; love is love always, but by 
Christ made a new and living way 
which he has consecrated for us. Faith 
is faith then, now and forever. Af- 
ter all their fears, the sorrowing dis- 
ciples bereft of their leader went forth 
and preached everywhere, the Lord 
working with them and confirming 
the Word with signs following. Just 
as He worked with them, he is ready 
to work with us. We cannot suppose 
Christ would limit his power by con- 
fining it to his immediate disciples 
and restricting it to his own genera- 
tion. 

By no other means than by this plan 
of special intelligence and sympathet- 
ic co-operation of his spirit with man 
could his work be perpetuated, so that 
all the world might have an oppor- 
tunity to hear of Christ and to know 
him as their Savior from sin. "Ye 
are my witnesses," said he, "go there- 
fore and teach all nations." Teach- 
ing is, at once, one of the noblest and 
most far-reaching of all professions, 
and at the same time, one of the surest 



from which to gather actual results. 
We cannot look into a school-room at 
a glance, and tell much, but watching 
pupils year after year, we may see 
"cornerstones polished after the sim- 
ilitude of a palace." 

Methodism's greatest battlefields 
for the future ar ewithin the realm of 
the childhood of the church, and among 
the poor we find multitudes of chil- 
dren with little hearts open, and 
minds just as receptive as they were 
when the Savior took them in his 
arms and blessed them saying, "Suf- 
fer little children to come unto me, 
and forbid them not, for of such is 
the kingdom of heaven." Not only is 
there the opportunity to save and pre- 
serve for the church the unfathered 
| and unmothered child, but through 
| this channel the tired, overburdened 
! mother may be touched, and there is 
a fine chance to reach the indifferent 
or besotted and sin-ridden father. 

The State winks at the commission 
of evil in the open saloons, disreput- 
able houses, lax divorce systems and 
an array of other evils, which manu- 
facture human wrecks; and then she 
provides asylums, hospitals, poor 
farms and kindred institutions to care 
for these broken lives. She is for- 
tunately learning that it is vastly 
easier to prevent these wrecks than 
to cure them after the crash has come. 
The open church with clubs, readwig 
rooms, social gatherings for old and 
young, night schools, elevating music, 
sewing school, cooking school, day 
nursery, pure milk station, ministra- 
tions of Deaconess and others sends 
out an uplifting and ennobling in- 
fluence through the community. All 
this supplementing faithful, construc- 
tive work along religious lines and 
the constant sounding of the evange- 
listic note will soon make some im- 
pression upon the entrenchments of 
sin in our land. Individual heart to 
heart contact today is just as effec- 
tive as it was in the early days of 
Methodism. A strong life saving sta- 
tion may become a constant recruit- 
ing center, furnishing members for the 
other churches. One of the first steps 
taken by the family, or individual af- 
ter being influenced for a better life 
is to find new environments, and prop- 
erly transplanted and nurtured they 
become a force in the new church 
home. 

More than six millions of foreigners 
have come to this country in the last 
six years. They are here largely at 
our invitation. Will we give them a 
Christian welcome? Will we show 
them how to prize the home, and the 
church, and the Sabbath? Will we 
give them the needed help and sym- 
pathy with their children in the mat- 
ter of moral and religious instruction? 
Divine providence is rolling this vast 
current of human life upon our shores 
to be received and evangelized by us. 
To us it becomes an open door of 
evangelistic opportunity. Let us not 
cease our efforts to send the gospel to 
the ends of the earth, for this is the 
inherent business of the church, but 
at the same time, let us remember 
that through immigration God is send- 
ing the ends of the earth to us. Here 
is an opportunity for us to exhibit ap- 
plied Christianity by offering school 
advantages, for they will seek the 
knowledge that will enable them to 
cope with other men in the business 
world and, while giving them this 
helpful knowledge, we also have an 
opportunity to give them a knowledge 
of Christ, "whom to know aright is 
eternal life." 

What is the Home Mission Society 
doing for these foreigners? We have 
three Cuban Schools, one the Wolf 
Mission, of Ybor City, Fla., was es- 
tablished in 1892 and has gone steadi- 
ly forward ever since, a beaconlight, 
a refuge for many a tired one. It has 
not been called Wesley House, but 
has always embraced many of the 
prominent features of a settlement 
home. Among other blessed results 
that have come from the work of the 
Wolf Mission, is the Italian Mission 



with far-reaching influence. In 1903 
a night school was established for the 
, Italians, but since that time a large 
work has gone on among the Spanish- 
speaking youth. We have the Sun- 
I day school, the Epworth Leagues, 
the Missionary societies, the lady 
j preachers and best of all, we see daily 
the transforming power of the gospel 
to change the lives of the believers, 
j Our Ruth Hargrove Institute is located 
at Key West, Fla. Key West has a 
| population of about 30,000, consisting 
of Americans, English, Cubans, Span- 
iards, Jews, Italians and negroes. It 
is through our school we must reach 
these people, for it is almost Impos- 
sible to reach the parents, the child's 
mind being more susceptible to In- 
fluence, hence the best soil for our la- 
bor and affords the best opportunity 
for an abundant harvest. 

In our mountain work we have three 
schools doing a wonderful work. The 
lack of passable thoroughfares is one 
of the greatest hindrances to educa- 
tional work in the mountains. Just as 
the rural free delivery has in five years 
raised the standard of intelligent and 
social life in thousands of rural com- 
munities, so would good roads prove 
a long step toward the redemption of 
the mountains. The condition of 
poverty is the first to be met. Wben 
the multitude became faint from hun- 
ger, Christ no longer taught them; so 
we must teach the multitude of the 
mountains how to feed themselves so 
as to nourish brain and muscle. Man 
to man, they are easily the equal of 
any people. The only sense In which 
these whites differ from other whites 
is that they constitute the purest An- 
glo-Saxon blood in the world today. 
The conviction grows and deepens 
that the Christian schools Is the solu- 
tion of the mountain problem. Fresh 
from the heart of nature with the iron 
of the hills in their blood, these moun- 
tain boys and girls respond to the 
touch of learning and the inspiration 
of moral truth and go out into the 
world to swell a higher and better 
civilization. Many of them return to 
their mountain homes to transform 
and uplift whole communities. Moun- 
taineers strong in mind as well as 
limb, wit ha sense of the Anglo-Sax- 
on's superiority, when educated, pos- 
sess the elements of leadership. Many 
of our ablest preachers, college presi- 
dents, legislators, lawyers, doctors, 
bankers, merchants and representa- 
tive men in the various walks of life 
are from the mountains, having caught 
the vision of a larger world in some 
modest school. The intelligent citi- 
zenship of the country has received 
a large contribution from our Sue 
Bennett Memorial School in London, 
Ky., our Brevard School in North 
Carolina, and our Industrial School in 
Greenville, Tenn., and in the discharge 
of a debt of gratitude, the public could 
well afford to endow and equip these 
splendid institutions. The invest- 
ments would declare perpetual divi- 
dends in educated men and women, 
and even in dollars and cents. 

In the Industrial work we have three 
schools, the Vashti Industrial School 
at Dallas, Texas; Payne Annex for 
negro girls* at Augusta, Ga. The girls 
at these schools are being trained in 
the household duties of laundry, cook- 
ing, sewing, in addition to the regular 
literary course; domestic efficiency 
and the ability to maintain themselves 
and thus better society, being the goal 
of our efforts for these dependent ones. 

When Christ walked the earth, he 
left a message of hope and forgive- 
ness for the prodigal girl, as well as 
for the prodigal boy; faithfully and 
continually we have sung the song of 
welcome home to the prodigal boy, but 
somehow we have not had enough love 
or consecration to open our hearts or 
homes to the prodigal girl. Many cen- 
turies have passed since Christ walk- 
ed the earth, but it was not until 
about 15 years ago that any evangel- 
ical church ever opened a door to 
the outcast girl. In every case where 



(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



Page Teu 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by H. A. Hayes, Superintendent 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS RE- 
CEIVED BY H. A. HAYES, SUPT. 
FOR WEEK ENDING DEC. 30. 

Rev. B. P. Hargett, Race Street S. 
S., Race Street Station, $2.73; V. A. 
J. Idol, Washington Street S. S., High 
Point Charge, $31.10; John J. Eagle, 
Spencer S. S., Spencer Station, $2.18; 
Rev. R. G. Tuttle, Elkin S. S., Elkin 
Station, $2.00; R. E. Biggerstaff, For- 
est City S. S., Forest City Station, 
$2.70; Wiley Thomasson, Oak Summit 
S. S„ Forsyth Circuit, $3.53; Total, 
$44.24; Total Fifth Sunday collections 
reported in October, $1,317.59. 

Cash 

Rev. J. A. Holmes, Denton Charge, 
$3.00; Rev. J. J. Barker, Biltmore 
Charge, Biltmore and Mt. Pleasant 
Circuit, $7.00; A. A. Johnson, Centen- 
ary church, Greensboro Charge, $35.46; 
W. C. Campbell, Southside-Salem Cir- 
cuit, $5.00; Rev. E. E. Williamson, 
Central Church, Shelby Station, $20.72; 
Mrs. J. S. Howey, Osceola, S. C, 
Christmas offering, $2.00; T. A. Ap- 
ple, Elks Lodge, Christmas offering, 
$25.00; Rev. H. C. Byrum, Kerners- 
ville Circuit, $7.00; Rev. W. H. Willis, 
Mt. Airy Station, $2.00; Mrs. C. C. 
Cornwell, Dallas church Aid Society 
offering, $10.00 Wm. Winkler, Christ- 
mas offpring, $5.00; Unknown, James- 
town, Christmas offering, $1.00; Miss 
Julia Albea, donation for "Mary Cath- 
erine Jones Library", $5.00; H. L. 
Chandler, Christmas offering, $10.00; 
Rev. J. W. Kennedy, Christmas offer- 
ing, $5.00; Hoil Flemming, Christmas 
offering to support fund, $2.07: Rev. 
Chas. A. Wood, Mt. Zion Charge. 
Charlotte District, $19.09; Rev. C. H. 
Curtis, Maiden. Circuit, $6.25; Total, 
$214.83. 

FOR WEEK ENDING JAN. 2, 1912 

J. W. Clinard, South Main st. S. S., 
High Point Station, $6.01; T. P. 
Snuggs, Randall S. S., Norwood 
Charge, 60c; W. F. Smith, Ramseur 
S. S., Ramseur and Franklinsville 
Charge, $8.00; Miss Shasta Abernethy, 
Denver S. S., Rock Springs Charge, 
$1.60; H. G. Clarke, Waxhaw S. S., 
Waxhaw Charge, $2.25; H. L. King, 
Mt. Pleasant S. S., Biltmore and Mt. 
Pleasant Charge, $1.99; W. J. Weaver, 
Marshall S. S., Marshall Charge, $1.67; 
Rev. G. H. Christenberry, Caraway 
Memorial S. S., Walnut Street and 
Caraway Memorial Charge, $2.36; M. 
W. Lee, Peachleand S. S., Polkton 
Charge, $2.00; J. D. Hull, Rutherford- 
ton, S. S., Rutherfordton Charge, $2.05; 
C. H. Dunn, Morven S. S., Morven 
Charge, $5.65; V. A. J. Idol, Washing- 
ton St. S. S., High Point Charge, 
$11.06; W. T. Green, Brevard Street 
S. S., Charlotte Charge, $3.00; E. D. 
Grubb, Walnut St. S. S., Greensboro 
Charge, $3.87; J. W. Kime, Forest 
Hill S. S., Concord Charge, $3.01; J. 
T. Britt, Pleasant Hill S. S., Morven 
Charge, $1.50; M. L. Lancaster, Lib- 
ertv S. S., Grace and Liberty Charge, 
$1.50; Geo. Rollins, Ca'roleen S. S., 
Henrietta and Caroleen Charge, $3.26; 
A. B. Beasley, Randleman and Naomi 
S. S., Randleman and Naomi Charge, 
$2.54; Mrs. L. C. Bickett, Newton S. 
S., Newton Charge, $8.05; J. M. Haw- 
kins, Acton S. S., Sulphur Springs 
Charge, $1.00; J. B. Mahaffee, Henriet- 
ta S. S., Henrietta and Caroleen 
Charge, $2.00; S. T. Barber, Gibson- 
ville S. S., East Greensboro Charge, 
$.68; J. C. Curtis, Pleasant Hill, S. S., 
Sulphur Springs Charge, $1.00; J. F. 
Clark, Dilworth S. S., Dilworth and 
Big Springs Charge, $6.35; Edwin 
Burge, Pattv's Chapel S. S., Fairview 
Charge, $5.00; C. C. Fincher, Bethle- 
hem S. S., Prospect Charge, 70c; Miss 
Jennie Luther, Asbury S. S., Sulphur 
Springs Charge, $1.20; H. A. Howard, 
Mt. Holly S. S., Mt. Holly Charge, 
$1.71; R. W. Shell, Whitnel S. S., 
Whitnel Charge, $3.00; E. F. Rector, 



Rector's Chapel S. S., Marshall Chge., 
$1.02;; John D. Lineberger, Shelby S 
S., Shelby Charge, $5.08; W. A. Grib- 
ble, Union S. S., Macon Charge, $.60; 
George L. Hackney, Lexington S. S., 
Lexington Charge, $12.83; D. F. 
Raines, Concord S. S., Coleridgt 

Charge, $3.00; W. A. Wagner, 

S. S., Weaverville Charge, 30.; 

E. J. Coltrane, Jamestown S. S., Po- 
mona Charge, $3.41; Mrs. Mary B. 
McLarty, West Market S. S., Primary 
Class, Greensboro Charge, $12.00; A. 
A. ohnson, Centenary S. S., Greensbo- 
ro Charge, $4.05; R. M. Ferguson, 
Crabtree S. S., Haywood Charge, $2.; 
S. T. Hodgin, Stoneville S. S., Stone- 
ville Charge, 65c; Will Robinson. 
Cestnut Grove S. S., Leicester Charge, 
$1.18; H. H. Hayes, Hopewell S. S.. 
Polkton Charge, $1.00; Lee English. 
Bright Hope S. S., Mars Hill Charge, 
45c; Mrs. J. L. Woltz, Stony Knoll S. 
S., Dobson Charge, 74c; Frank D. 
Hackett, North Wilkesboro S. S., N. 
Wilkesboro Charge, $2.25; J. R. Raper, 
Linwood S. S., Linwood Charge, 
$7.31; Mary L. Hix, Beula S. S., Wilk- 
es Charge, $1.55; W. H. Rogers, New 
"Mt. Tabor S. S., Salem Charge, 75c, 
John F. Hardin, Boone S. S., Boone 
Charge, $1.58; E. A. Caudle, Liberty 
S. S., Liberty Charge $7.20; C. C. Shell 
Lenoir S. S., Lenoir Charge, $1.56: G 

F. Ivey, First M. E. S. S., Hickorv 
Charge, $6.00: J. S. Myers, Bethel S 
S., Morven Charge, $3.25; Dr. J. E. 
Kerr, Lilesville S. S., Lilesville Charge. 
$3.27; W. J. Pruett, Brevard S. S. 
Brevard Station,' $4.26; J. A. Jones 
South Main St. S. S., Salisbury Sta 
tion, $1.41; Total, $184.21. 

Cash 

W. F. Smith, Ramseur-Franklinville 
Charge, $8.95; Rev. R. E. Atkinson 
Mocksville Charge, $12.75; J. F. Hard 
in, Boone Charge, Thank offering 
$212; Rev. E. Mvers, Mooresvillr 
Charge, $16.44; Rev. M. F. Moores 
Wavnesville Station, Thanksgiving 
and Christmas offering, $10.25; Gu->- 
Weaver, North Asheville Church 
$8.89; Miss Clara Bowles, Hickorv 
station "Light Bearers," $14.04; Rev 
F. L. Townsend, Leaksville Station 
$25.00; Mrs. W. S. Bradley, Trinit< 
Church Home Hission Society, Christ 
^as offering, Charlotte, $22.00; L. L 
Hardin, Main Street Church, Gastoni' 
Charge, $44.66; J. H. Bost, Tryon St 
Baraca Class, support of Lione' 
Vaughan, $8.35; Mrs. H. G. Chatham 
support of a child, $100. Rev. E. J. 
Poe, Rutherford College and Connel- 
ley Springs Charge, $4.35; J. T. Lam- 
bert, General support fund, $2.50; F 
M. Markland, Advance I. O. O. F. of- 
fering, $4.39; Total $294.69. 



DONATIONS IN KIND RECEIVED 
BY H. A. HAYES. SUPT., SINCE 
NOVEMBER 24, 1911 

Mrs. Geo. Cox, Winston-Salem, onp 
overcoat; Mt. Pleasant S. S., Clem- 
mons, one box jellv: Mrs. G. V. Bod- 
onheimer, Thomasville, one dress. 
Salisbury Cotton Mills, one lot cloth: 
F. H. Nowlen. one box merchandise- 
Mrs. Fdwin Martin, Washington. D 
C. and Mrs. Paul Bronson, New York 
City, one box Horn's candv; Mrs. E 
S. Wolfe. Candler, one box canned 
troods: W. H. M. Society of Pilot 
Mountain, six crates eroceries, fruits, 
etc; Mrs. M. A. Bright, Glen Alpine, 
one box cloth'ne a^d jellv, one quilt; 
Ruth Booe. Moeksville, one box cloth- 
ing: W .E. Stamps, Granite Falls, one 
coon chickens: Fnworth League of W. 
Market Street Church, Greensboro, 5 
rues, one box Christmas prpsents and 
fruits: Epworth Leaeue, W. Markpt 
St.. Greensboro, one lot elothin? and 
ouilts: A'd Sonipfv of Pattv's Chappl 
a"d Fairview Chaopl. one box fruit; J. 
K. Boone, Wavnpsville, one barrel ap- 
ples; W. H. M. Society, West Market 
St., Greensboro, one bolt cloth, one 



quilt; W. S. McGeb.ee, Winston-Salem, 
one shoulder meat; Ladies' Aid So- 
ciety, New London, one lot clothing 
for Lula Bobbitt; Spencer Junior 
League and Light Bearers, one box 
books and clothing; Ladies of Brysoii 
City Church, 3 boxes canned goods; 
Stokesdale M. E. S. S., one box fruit, 
Central Church, Albemarle, one box 
clothing and quilts; Mrs. Hugh Chat- 
ham, one lot clothing; Margaret Ray 
Patterson, Greensboro, one box Christ- 
mas articles; a friend at Statesville, 
one nice box Christmas presents; E. 
E. Gray, Winston-Salem, one lot cakes; 
Miss Swain, Centerville, one lot fresh 
meat; Cromer Bros., Winston-Salem, 
one box cakes; Ladies of Mt. Zion 
church, Cornelius, one box clothing; 
Elks of Winston-Salem, one box cloth- 
ing; Ladies' H. M. Society, Pine Hall, 
one Christmas box for Lelia Saunders, 
C. F. Morrison, Wilkesboro, one box 
clothing and Christmas articles; Hat- 
tie and Nellie Bobbitt, Winston-Salem, 
one lot Christmas articles for Herbert 
and Lula Bobbitt; Young Ladies' Mis- 
sionary Society, West End, Winston- 
Salem, one lot Christmas articles for 
Wayburn Phillips; Mr. and Mrs. Will 
R. Keiger, King, one box gloves and 
scarfs; Mrs. Varner, Miss Helen Var- 
ner and Mrs. J. W. Sears, Concord, 
one Christmas box for boys; Mrs. Ros- 
coe Phifer and children, one Christmas 
box; Y. W. C. A. of G. F. College, 
Greensboro, one box Christmas pres- 
ents; Mrs. E. B. Laird and S. S. Class. 
Charlotte, one barrel quilts and blank- 
ets; C. W. Jennings, Greensboro, two 
barrels apples, 3 boxes oranges; Cbas 
V. Troutman, Mooresville two heads 
bananas and one box oranges; B. B. 
Sparger Mt. Airy, one barrel apples; 
Or P. CarmichaeJ, Winston-Salem, one 
box oranges; Mrs. A. W. Kochtitzky. 
Monroe, one box oranges; Elkin S. S.. 
^lkin, one box Christmas goods, Beth- 

ehem S. S., Climax, one box quilts; 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ulrich, North 
Vilkesboro, one box apples; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. C. Douglas, Rusk, one box 
clothing and Christmas goods; Stone 
'ille Church, one box Christmas goods- 
t. C. Norman, Reidsville, one Rhode 
"sland Red Cockerel, Centenary Pri 
"nary Department, Winston-Salem, one 
buckpt oranges; Mrs. Geo. Cox, Win- 
ston-Salem, one quilt and one lot 

andkerchiefs; Class No. 17, Newton 
me box Christmas goods; Hugh Mil- 
'er, Asheville, one box oranges; W. J. 
Iroomc, Greensboro, one thorough- 
bred Wyandotte cockerel and 3 pul- 
lets; Some Methodists of Waxhaw, onr 
box linen and Christmas goods; Mrs. 
Tohn S. Roth, Elkin, one turkey; Mrs 
T. W. Griffith and the children of Mt. 
Pleasant S. S., Clemmons, one box 
"lothing and quilts; P. H. Hanes 
Winston-Salem, one box oranges; T 
T. Matthews, Winston-Salem, one box 
iranges; Mrs. Dr. D. N. Dalton, Win- 
ston-Salem, one box oranges, Dr. W. 
O. Spencer, Winston-Salem, one box 
oranges; M. J. Freeman, High Point, 
me box Christmas goods; Jamestown 
S. S., one rug, one quilt, one barrel 
fruit, and one lot Christmas goods: 
Y. W. C. A., State Normal College. 
Greensboro, one box Christmas goods; 
Trinity S. S., Trinity, one box sugar: 
Centenary S. S., Greensboro, one box 
blankets, handkerchiefs, mittens ano 
Christmas things; Hart's S. S., one 
box quilts: Morven S. S., one box quilts 
<md clothing; Unknown, one box 
Christmas things: A stranger, one box 
candy; W. G. Cranford, Winston-Sal- 
em, one barrel apples and one bag 
neanuts; Unknown, Hominy, 2 boxes 
apples; Unmarked, 3 boxes oranges; 
The Woman's Reading Club, one box 
quilts; Candler, one box oranges; a 
friend, one packasre handkerchiefs and 
ribbon: Baraca Class of First Church, 
Salisbury, one suit clothes for Hiatt 
Reeves: L. B. Davis, North Wilkes- 
boro, 1 Box apples. 



RFPORT OF JOHN F. KIRK, AGT., 
FOR TWO WEEKS ENDING JAN. 
6, 1912 

Paid on Notes 

E, W, Staples, $2.50; Cosmo Benson, 



$1.25; A. B. Kirby, $2.00; L. C. Street- 
or,*$2.50; J. E. A. Ratliff, $5.00; J. G. 
Watson, $5.00; B. M. Mellon, $2.50; 
T. C. Cox, $5.00; E. L. Griggs, $2.50; 
C. R. Payne, $2.50; Mrs. F. Tilley, $5; 
F. S. Thomas, $6.25; D. P. McLarty, 
$6.25; C. M. Robinson, $5.00; G. C. 
King, $10.00; L. C. Lawrence,, $2.50; 
R. K. Harris, $1; J. T. Shore, $1; R. 

A. Child, $10; S. S. Howie, $10; I. 
H. Hine, $10.00; J. W. Grimes, $5.00; 
F. Z. Morris, $5.00; R. B. Terry, $10.; 
L. E. Guion, $2.50; Mrs. J. A. Stewart, 
$2.50; J. E. Eflrd, $12.50; E. E. Howie, 
$5.00; J. M. Bickett,$2.50; J. W. Elliott, 
$5.00; A. J. Cloninger, $2.50; K. L. 
Lowning, $10.00; J. E. Kerr, $12.50; H. 
L. Kirby, $10.00; D. M. Kirby, $5.00; 
Guy E. Dixon, $25.00; J. W. Fowlei, 
$25.00; R. O. Phifer, $12.50; W. B. 
Brown, $5.00; E. L. Sells, $10.00; W. 

B. Houston,, $50.00; O. W. Kochtitzky, 
$5.00; W. L. Patterson, $5.00; J. W. 
$12.50; W. Lee, $25.00; R. B. Redwine. 
Love, $5.00; J. A. Jerome, $5.00; Mrs 
J. C. Carroll, $5.00; H. W. McGwyn, 
$5.00; H. G. Clarke, $5.00; H. A. How- 
ard, $5.00; W. H. Howie, $5.00; E. L. 
Niven, $5.00; H. L. Gore, $5.00; W. h. 
lendle, $5.00; W. S. Roberson, $5.00; 
W. T. Roberson, $5.00; R. A. Brown, 
$5.00; Bessie Aiken, $5.00; B. R. Joyce, 
?10.00; Dr. J. T. Taylor, $5.00; C. E. 
Miller, $2.50. Lincolnton: A. M. Win- 
gate, $5.00. Reidsville: W. A. Troi- 
L er, $12.50. High Point: W. J. Mc- 
Analy, $12.50. Union ville:. W. A. 
Love, $5.00. Lilesville: S. E. Hatcher, 
^5.00. High Point: J. R. Fitzgerald, 
$2.50. Concord: Herbert Ridenhour, 
S5.00. Henderson ville: W. S. Miller, 
'12.50. Monroe: T. J. Payne, 12.50. 
Granite Falls: L. W. Payne, $2.00; 
Mendersonville: H. C. Meyer, $4.00. 
Total collected from notes $531.25. 

General Building Fund 

Thomasville: W. S. Wood, $2.00. 
Monroe: T. J. W. Broom, $10.00; R. 

B. Cuthberson, $5.00. Shelby: Mrs. 
O. M. Harrelson, $5.00. Lilesville: 
Robert L. Lindsey, $5.00. High Poiat: 
T. P. Redding, $25.00. North Wilk's- 
boro: Prof. W. R. Absher, $5.00; W. 
V Sydnor, $2.00. Concord: Mrs. Jas. 
0. Fink, $4.00. Matthews: Miss Cal- 
'ie Squires, $5.00. Mooresville: J. W. 
Cohen, $2.00. Mt. Holly: Rev. J. A. 
Bowles, $5.00; J. W. Fisher, $5.00. 
Oreensboro: R. F. Rice, $6.00; O. S. 
Short, $7.00; M. W. Sterne, $12.50. 
Shelby: P. L. Hennessa, $5.00. Hick- 
ory: Mrs. J. F. Peterson, $2.00. 
Reidsville: R. L. E. Ellington, $50.00. 
Bryson City: J. Robert Long, $12.00. 
Elenboro: W. F. Blanton, $1.00. Con- 
nelly Springs: D. W. Alexander, $5; 
Rutherford College: Rev. E. J. Poe, 
M0.00. Cherry ville: W. J. Allran. $4, 
Greensboro: W. E. Johnson, $2.00. 
High Point: J. W. Harris, $50.00; W. 
L. Stamey, given credit for $16.50 on 
subscription, for printing done for 
agent. Hendersonville: Mr. and Mrs 
E. C. Ross, $6.25. Lawndale: Loula 
Belle Wilson, $3.00. Lenoir: Miss 
E. C, $5.00; Mrs. M. Tuttle Sigmon, 
$5.00; L. H. Tuttle, $10.00; Dr. W. P. 
T vey, $12.50. Lexington: Mrs. M. C 
Siceloff, $2.50. Madison: G. W. Mar 
Mn, $10.00. Monroe: Miss N. Isabella 
Starnes, $1.00. McFarlan: J. T. Britt, 
$5.00. Mooresville: J. Will Temple- 
ton. $1.25. Mt. Ulla: H. A. Erwin, 
$2.50. Norwood: Rev. J. W. Clegg, 
$25.00. North Wilkesboro: Mrs. M 

C. Gwvn, $25.00: L. Ulrich, $4.00 
Wilkesboro: G. W. Isley, $5.00. Ran 
dleman: Miss Lena Moore, $5.00 
Rutherfordton: J. L. Dobbins, $5.00; 
Salisbury: W. T. Burke. $1.00; W. A 
Fowler, $1.00: C. S. Morris, $1.00; 
Snencer: B F. Stephenson, $10.88; 
Shelby: Wibur H. Baber, $5.00 
Statesville: J. D. Holland, $2.0( 
Wavhaw: Miss Sadie Winchps^er 
$1.00. Wadesboro: W. P. Dunlap 
SI .25. Winston-Salem: West Fnd S 
S.. $4.40. Bostic: John G. Babpr, $2 
Cullosala: T. R. Gray, $5.00. Monroe. 
W. L. Rane. $1.25. Lenoir: Mrs 
Marv N. Grist, $12 50. Total $427.78; 
Total on notes. $531.25; Grand tota 
for two weeks, $959.03. 



January 11, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



Our Little Folks 



+ 




A LITTLE ORPHAN IN THE WOODS 

Ellen D. Masters 

One day when the Groome children 
were playing in the woods just beyond 
the big cornfield they found a poor lit- 
tle squirrel almost starved to death 
down at the foot of a tall hickory nut 
tree. The little fellow was frightened 
when he saw the children, but was too 
young and weak from hunger to run 
far, and Frank caught him very easily. 
Then he lay very still and seemed to 
be almost dead while Prank and Maud 
and Elsie curiously examined his soft 
gray fur coat and his cunning little 
paws and long bushy tail. They had 
never had a live squirrel to hold in 
their hands before. 

"It must be nearly starved," said 
Prank, "or it would try to run away." 

"Here are some hickory nuts," said 
little Elsie; "why didn't it eat them?" 

" 'Cause it's a little baby squirrel," 
said Maud. "You know little babies 
can't eat hard things." 

"If its mamma would crack them, 
it could," said Elsie. 

"I think maybe somebody with a 
gun has shot its mother," said Prank 
wisely. 

"O Prank," said Maud, very much 
shocked, "do you suppose its mamma 
is dead? Let's take it home and care 
for it." 

So they carried the little squirrel 
up to the house and showed it to 
their mother. 

"Poor little orphan!" she said. 
"We will see if we can feed it." And 
she warmed some milk in a little pan 
and coaxed the baby squirrel to suck 
up a little of it. Then they made it a 
bed in an old basket in the kitchen, 
and it went to -sleep. 

The next day the children named 
him Frisky. Mamma said the name 
didn't seem very suitable for such a 
half-dead little creature, but, very 
likely, if he did not die, he would be 
frisky before long. She fed the little 
squirrel herself for a few days unti 1 
he was stronger, then the children 
had the sole care of him. 

Frisky's name was not unsuitable 
long, for he soon became as cunning 
and playful as a kitten. He would 
sit on his hind legs, with his fluffy tail 
curled up over his shoulder, and nib- 
ble at anything the children gave him 
to eat. He seemed very much at 
home and was not afraid of any of the 
family. But papa said it was very 
likely that Frisky would go back to 
the woods when he was fully grown. 

The children did not like to think of 
giving up their pet and one day they 
held a consultation about putting 
Frisky in a cage to keep him from 
running away. 

"Jimmie Crane has a squirrel cage 
that we could buv," said Frank. "His 
pet squirrel died." 

"I would hate for Frisky to leave 
us," said Maud, "and I would hate to 
shut him up in a little cage when he 
likes to run and play so much." 

"He could run on the little wheel in 
the cage," said Frank. 

"I wouldn't like to be shut up in a 
little bit of a room all the time, with 
nothing but a wheel to run on," said 
Maud. "Yo" know vou wouldn't, 
v rank." 



"No, of course," said Frank; "but 
if Frisky is going to run away from 
us after we have gone to the trouble 
to bring him up, I don't know what 
else we can do." 

"Let's just let him do as he'd 
rather," said little Elsie. "Of course 
we want Frisky to have the best time 
of any squirrel that ever was." 

"Well," said Frank, "we will let 
him alone and see what he will do." 

And Frisky himself finds it hard 
to decide. He is a grown-up squirrel 
now and often runs away to the woods 
for several days; then he will come 
back to the Groome family and play 
about the trees in the yard and come 
into the house. 

Frank and Maud and Elsie are glad 
that they did not shut him up in a 
cage, for then they would not have 
known how fond he was of them. 



THE REAL VICTORY 

A little boy was in a very serious 
frame of mind; in fact, he was quite 
gloomy and dejected. To be sure, his 
side had not won the cricket match, 
but that was scarcely enough to ac- 
count for his present state of feeling. 
He had lost before, and usually had 
pretty good grace. But to-day no sym- 
pathy appealed to him; no cheerful 
encouragement won so much as a 
shadow of a smile. 

Mother waited for the situation to 
develop, and at last the silence was 
broken. Slowly, seriously, solemnly 
the boy said: "Mother, God was on 
the side of the bad boys, and they won. 
You see, we fellows thought we would 
try awfully, hard and not get mad 01 
cheat or say bad words- And not 
one fellow did. And the other fellow 
did. And they won , and we were 
licked. God was on their side all 
light, and it is not fair." 

Ordinary comfort and explanation 
availed nothing. The fact remained. 
The faithful little band that had tried 
to do right had been beaten by the 
rough little crowd that did not care 
anything at all about it. God was on 
the side of might, not right. This 
was self-evident and did not admit of 
explanation, and who wants comforl 
for injustice? After a while fathei 
came in, and before the boy saw him 
mother had presented the case. 

He thought cheerfully for awhile. 
Then his cheerful voice was heard 
"Well, my boy, I hear you won out to- 
day." 

"Well, then," in a voice of awful 
solemnity, ' you heard wrong, 'cause 
we didn't; we were licked." 

"O, but I heard that there were two 
contests; which did you win?" 

"Why, I don't know what you mean, 
father." 

"Mother told me about it. She told 
me you lost the match, but you won the 
most important thing; you didn't 
beat the other fellows, but you beat 
yourselves and conquered all the an- 
ger and unfairness and bad language. 
Congratulations, old fellow! You won 
out, and I'm proud of you." 

The boy's face was slowly undergo- 
ing a change. It was growing once 
more interested, happy, and hopeful. 
"Why, that's so dad," he said joyous- 
ly after a minute; "I didn't see that. 
And God was on our side after all, 
wasn't he?" 

"Greater is he that ruleth his spirit, 
than he that taketh a city," said the 
father with a smile. — Grace Duffield 
Goodwin, in the Little Christian. 



HOW EFFIE FOUND A FRIEND 

By Susy L. Bacon. 

Effie came from school one cold 
winter morning looking very cross. 
"What do you think, mamma?" she 
said; "my teacher has gone and put 
me right next to a horrid boy with 



the dreadfulest clothes. None of the 
children speak to him. An' I did have 
such a nice desk by Susy May. I 
think it's mean." 

"Well, dear," replied mamma, "I 
don't think I'd mind because he hasn't 
nice clothes, and perhaps you will find 
him nicer than you think." 

Effie did not answer but she looked 
out of sorts. 

A day or two later she came to mam- 
ma. "O mamma, that boy, Peter Ma- 
son, brings the worst things for lunch, 
just dry bread sometimes. An' they're 
so poor Peter sells papers out of school. 
I think it's horrid to have to sit by 
him." 

"Why, Effie," said mamma gravely. 

Effie pouted, but the next day when 
she opened her lunch basket there was 
an extra apple turnover. "I'll give it 
to Susy," thought Effie. She started 
over to where Susy May was talking 
to a crowd of children. Peter Mason 
was not among them. Effie stopped 
and wrinkled up her little forehead, 
thinking. Presently she carried the 
turnover to where Peter stood quite 
alone. "Here, this is for you," she 
said. She turned and ran away be- 
for Peter fairly understood that the 
delicious dainty was really for him. 
But after that a number of good things 
p ound their way from Effie's basket to 
Peter, who accepted them with a grati- 
tude which Effie did not even guess. 

One afternoon, a few days before 
Christmas, Effie's big sister, Mary, 
was going shopping, and the little girl 
begged to go too. The shops were 
very crowded and the toys so wonder- 
ful that Effie was bewildered. She 
stood enchanted before a case of doll? 
until Mary grew impatient. "Effie," 
?he said, "I must go to the handeker- 
"hief counter. But that is right by 
l he door, an you cannot miss me 
Come there when you are tired of the 
lolls." 

"All right," said Effie. 

But when she finally reached the 
loor there was no sign of Mary. Ef- 
fie peered outside, and was sure shr 
saw Mary's brown skirt and fur jack- 
et just ahead. So, without anothei 
thought, the little girl hurried out in 
o the crowded street. She raced alone 
through the busy shoppers. But when 
she caught up with the brown skirt 
it was not Mary at all. Effie was ter- 
ribly frightened and wanted to cry. 

Just then some one touched her arm 
She turned, and there was Peter, hi- 
napers under his arm and a grin on 
his freckled little face. 

"O you dear Peter," exclaimed Effie 
and she told him how se had lost 
Mary. 

"Come on," said Peter. "I know 
that store, an' I guess you jus' went 
to the wrong door." 

And sure enough when Peter had 
Tuided Effie to the big department 
■store, there stood Mary at the front 
door talking to a friend. • 

"Well, Effie, are you ready?" Mary 
said. And then she stared and stared 
at Peter. 

But Effie squeezed his hand. "I'm 
so glad I sit by you," she said. — Boys 
and Girls. 



AUNT FANNY'S STORY 

It was dinner-time, but Harold was 
huddled in the corner of the bath- 
room. "I don't want a clean face!" 
he declared stubbornly, while Aunt 
Fanny waited patiently. "Some one 
is always trying to wash me or put 
on my shoes or take them off!" he 
complained. 
"I want to tell you a nice story," 
The great mountains remind us of 
the stability, changelessners and eter- 
nity of a God who is before them, and 
back of them, and before them. "Be- 
fore the mountains were brought forth 
or ever thou hadst formed the earth 
and the world born from everlasting 
to everlasting, thou art God!" Who 
contemplates these grand old sentenels 
of all tae centuries without higher 
thought of God, and without being a 
better man? An old mountaineer 
gave as his reason for climbing every 



day to the top of a mountain that 
stood near his home: "Because it 
makes me feel so heaven-histed!" 
Who looks at them without heavenly 
aspirations? "As the mountains are 
round obout Jerusalem, so the Lord is 
round about his people from hence- 
forth even for ever." 

The great seas compel us to think 
of the wideness and the depth of di- 
vine compassino. Who has stood on 
the shore of the great ocean and looked 
away as far as eye would allow, and 
come away without a feeling of awe 
and humbe reverence? Few, I appre- 
hend. Just so we may be reminded 
of the length and breadth, and depth 
of divine mercy. 

"There's a wideness in God's mercy, 
Like the wideness of the sea: 
There's a kindness in his justice, 
Which is more than liberty. 

For the love of God is broader 
Than the measure of man's mind; 
And the heart of the Eternal 
Is most wonderful kind. 

If our faith were but man simple, 
We would take him at his word: 
And our lives would be all sunshine 
In the sweetness of our Lord." 

The rocks, those hugh Doulders that 
carry the mountains upon their backs 
awaken thoughts of God in the heart. 
Perhaps it was recollections of the 
rock where was the cave of Adullam 
that caused David to write such a 
thought as this about God: "Thou 
art my Father, my God and the Rock 
of my salvation." And we look at 
these great stones and sing: 
"Rock of ages cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in thee!" 

Even the tender grass and the little 
lowers by our pathway and in our 
gardens become his love tokens to us. 
r f we are anxious about tne morrow, 
hath he not said: "Consider the lilies. 
Even Soomon in all his glory was not 
trrayed like one of these. If God so 
"lothe the grass of the field, shall he 
not much more clothe you?" 

And then the little birds are tokens 
of his providing care. He also said of 
'hem, "Behold the fowls the fowls of 

•"he air your heavenly Father 

Vedeth them. Are ye not much better 
'han they?" Where now is your faith 
: n divine providence? Hear the ser- 
-non of the sparrow. 

Our bread is a reminder of our 
daily need of the bread of life, and 
f he water we drink is a token of our 
need of the waters of salvation full 
md free in Him. 

Prio to, and even at the timeof the 
crucifixion of the Christ, the Roman 
toss was a symbol disgrace, and death 
to persons guilty of crime. But His 
death sanctified the cross, so that now 
it is a token of divine reconciliation 
and love. Now, instead of bringing 
'eelings of horrow and dismay to the 
beholder, it becomes a token of love 
and may well be considered as a most 
appropriate and most beautiful charm 
with which to adorn a lover of Him 
who died upon the tree. 

What are those elements adminis- 
tered to us in our Lord? Supper but 
tokens reminding us as oft as we par- 
take, that only through His broken 
body and shed blood hove we remmis- 
sion of sin and life eternal? 

Let us thank God for every token, 
Mttle and large, of his love, compas- 
sion, mercy; and may they all have 
voices eloquent with tenderness call- 
ing us back to Him against whom we 
have sinned. Aad may our eyes be 
so purified for visions beatifie that we 
may realize that 

"Earth's heaven crammed, 
And every common bush is on fire 
With God!" 

F. L. Townsend. 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND 
BUILD UP THE SYSTEM 

Take the OM Standard Grove's Taste- 
|o<5<5 Phlll Tnnie. T"u know what you are 
taking. The formula Is plainlv prt->t°d 
"Ti every h^ttle, showing It Is simply 
<~>ulnlne and Iron in a tasteless form, and 
the most effectual form. For grown peo- 
ple and children. 50 cents. 



Pag« Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 19: 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON II— 
JANUARY 14, 1912 

The Birth of John the Baptist 
Luke 1s57-80 

Golden Text — Blessed be the Lord, 
the God of Israel; for he bath visited 
and wrought redemption for his peo- 
ple. 

The Coming of a Child 

The friends of Elisabeth were all 
full of words of eager congratulation. 
A spirit of joy filled the home in the 
hill country of Judea. A child had 
been born to Elisabeth and best of all 
from the Jewish point of view, that 
child was a son. The house which so 
long had been without the sound of a 
child's voice was silent no longer. 

The crowning gift of a Jewish wo- 
man's life had been received by Elisa- 
beth, and she lay silent and happy, 
with deep, brooding «yes and a won- 
derful consciousness of the child be- 
side her, filling all her heart. Added 
to the joy which always comes with 
motherhood was the deep feeling that 
in a peculiar sense this child was a 
gift of God, sent for God's work in 
the world. The presence of the little 
life entrusted to them was a seal of 
God's presence and favor in the home 
of Zacharias and Elisabeth. The birth 
of John the Baptist was not merely a 
secular event. It was fraught with 
deep and far-reaching religious signifi- 
cance. 

There is imething vetry beautiful 
in the thought of the solem and seri- 
ous way in which Zacharias and Elisa- 
beth received their gift of a son. A 
halo seems to rest on their home as 
we think of it. But one wonders if. 
after all, all fathers and mothers do 
not have the right to a share in the 
same reverent awe and worship as 
the gift of a child is received by them. 
Is not every little life a trust from 
God? Has not every mother a right 
to feel that the tiny bundle of life 
she holds so tightly in her arms is a 
gift of the heavenly Father? Is there 
any right way to receive a child ex- 
cept in awe and wonder and praver- 
ful gratitude? In truth every child is 
a gift and a trust and a revelation 
from the loving Father who presides 
over human lives. 

The End of Zacharias' Silence 

The good priest Zacharias had been 
silent for a long time. Days and 
weeks and months had gone by since 
he had seen the angel in the temple, 
and yet he had not spoken. A writing 
tablet had been provided for him, and 
so he haJ slowly communicated his* 
thoughts and wishes to his wife and 
his friends. All the while he was 
musing and meditating. His face had 
a still, solemn gladness upon it as he 
sat sometimes in the sunlight. It was 
clear that he was thinking deep and 
beautiful thoughts. If the period of 
speechlessness was in some sense a 
chastisement and a discipline to Zach- 
arias, it was also a gift of God. In a 
measure he was isolated with great 
thoughts. He was filled with a sense 
that the hand of God was upon him. 
God must be very near when he was 
making it impossible for him to speak. 
Then great events lay ahead. Zacha- 
rias was perfectly sure of that and he 
earnestly set about preparing himself 
for them. The period of silence was 
a time of praver and serious thought. 
Zacharias desired to be worthy to be 
the father of the son who was to be 
intrusted to his care. Many thoughts 
of God's purposes for His people and 
many words from the prophets and 
the psalms filled the mind of Zacha- 
rias. He was a sort of living sanctuary 
for priestly thoughts in the days when 
no words broke from his lips. 

Then came the day when he used 
the writing tablet for the last time. 



The house was full of hearty, bustling 
friends, discussing the strange desire 
of the mother that the little boy should 
be called John. They appealed to the 
father. He asked for the writing tab- 
let and wrote upon it, "His name is 
John." He was loyally carrying out 
the direction of the angel, though it 
may have been with a tug at his heart 
as he thought that the child was not 
to hear his father's name. He would 
have been glad to see another Zacha- 
rias growing up in his home, but he 
unhesitatingly submitted to the divine 
will. And suddenly the power to 
speak returned to him. The days of 
silence were over, and words of bless- 
ing and praise to God leaped from his 
lips. 

A Song of Gratitude 

The "Song of Zacharias" was first 
of all an expression of gratitude. It 
was filled with a sense of the presence 
of God and" the dawn of the Messianic 
age. The great day foreseen by proph- 
ets and promised of old had come. It 
was a day of deliverance. It was a 
day of salvation. It was a day of 
mercy. It was the inauguration of an 
era of righteousness and holy life. 
The man who can read over the words 
of Zacharias with an understanding 
mind and a glowing heart has much 
for which to be grateful. To be stirr- 
ed by high ideals and to believe that 
they are to be made real now is one 
of the greatest things in the world 
The man who believes in ideals, but 
does not believe in their realization 
becomes misanthropic. The man who 
is practically shrewd and efficient, but 
does not believe in ideals becomes a 
cynic. The man who believes in ideal? 
and in their power to conquer and 
make a place for themselves in the 
world's life can sing a song of grati 
tude like that of Zacharias. 

The gratitude of Zacharias is the 
gratitude of faith. What has actual- 
ly happened is the birth of a very lit- 
tle child. What the priest thank? 
God for is the complete transforma- 
tion of the life of his people. He i? 
singing a song of triumph beforehand 
His faith has taken wings and he 
thanks God for days to come. 

There is something nobly creative 
in such faith as this. It helps to 
bring the day which it foresees. It 
has a share in producing the glories 
over which it rejoices before they have 
come to be. The man who sang the 
"Benedictus" was just the man to be 
the father of John the Baptist. John 
did not get all of his message during 
his brooding days in the wilderness. 
Some of it came from his father with 
his far-reaching dreams. The man 
who stumbled at the word of the an- 
gel had become in a very real sense 
a man of faith. 

A Song of Anticipation 

The song of Zacharias focused at 
last on the share of his own son in 
preparing for the great day which 
was soon to dawn. It is a singular 
thing that the words of the father are 
full of the sense of moral ministry 
of his son. The old priest sees that 
the remission of sins is a matter of 
the most critical importance and that 
the new day is to be a day of salva- 
tion. How deeply he had meditated 
on these things we do not know, but 
there is a ringing ethical note in the 
last part of his song, quite in accord 
with the later ministry of John the 
Baptist. Then the story closes with 
a vivid word or two. One sees light 
shining w}th clear radiance where 
there was darkness and many feet 
walking in peaceful ways. Light and 
peace and salvation are to be God's 
gifts to men. Of these things Zacha- 
rias sang and many and many a time 
in the quiet evening we may be sure 
he talked of them to the growing boy. 
John drank in great thoughts and great 
hopes and a great sense of God in his 
earlist youth. No wonder he grew 
up to be a prophe-t. 

We would have a great many more 
prophetic preachers if we had more 
homes where the sense of God and His 



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NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



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SECRETARY'S 
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Editor of League Columns 
Miss Blanche Johnson 
135 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 



ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

1. What is the number of Annual 
Conferences? 

Forty-seven. 

2. How are they bounded? 

By natural, not by state lines. 

3. Who compose an Annual Confer- 
ence? 

The traveling preachers within its 
limits and the lay delegates. 

4. From whence are their names de- 
rived? 

A principal city, river, or the state 
in which they are situated. 

5. How often does the Annual Con- 
ference meet? 

Once a year. 

6. How long does a session of An- 
nual Conference last? 

About one week. 

7. Who presides? 
One of the bishops. 

8. What is the name of the Annual 
Conference in which you live? 

(To be supplied) 

9. Where and when was its last ses- 
sion held? 

10. Who presided? 

11. At what place will your An- 
nual Conference hold its next session? 

DISTRICT CONFERENCE 

1. What is a district? 

It is a portion of the territory of 
an Annual Conference, including a 
dozen or more charges, as circuits, 
stations or missions. 

2. What is a circuit? 

It is a collective name of several 
churches, under the charge of one min- 
ister. 

3. What is he called? 
The circuit preacher. 

4. How long is a preacher in mak- 
ing a round? 

Usually a month, preaching on week 
days, as well as Sundays. 

5. When is a circuit called a mis- 
sion? 

When it is not self-supporting. 

6. From what source do they re- 
ceive aid? 

The Missionary Board. 

7. Wherein does a station differ 
from a circuit? 

When the preacher has the charge 
of one or two churches, to which he 
ministers weekly, that is called a 
station. 

8. What is the name of the district 
in which you live? 

9. What church officer has the over- 
sight of a district? 

The Presiding Elder. 

10. Who is your Presiding Elder? 

11. What is the name of the station 
in which you live? 

12. Who is your pastor? 

13. When was your last district 
Conference held? 

14. Where will its next session be 
held? 



QUARTERLY CONFERENCE 

1. What is a Quarterly Conference? 
It is a meeting of the official mem- 
bers to attend to Church business. 

2. How often does it meet? 
Four times a year. 

3. What is the business of this 
body? 

It elects superintendents of Sunday 
schools, trustees and stewards. 

4. " Are the proceedings recorded? 
The minutes are kept by the secre- 
tary. 

5. When are the minutes read? 
At the close of the session. 

6. Of what value are these records? 
They preserve important facts in 

the history of the Church. 

7. What provision is made for pre- 
serving the journals? 

A recodring steward is elected. 



8. What is his duty? 

He records the minutes of the Quar- 
terly Conference, when approved. 

9. Where are the records of Quar- 
terly Conference sent for examination? 

To the District Conference. 

10. When was your last Quarterly 
meeting held? 

11. Was it the first, second, third 
or fourth Quarterly Meeting for the 
year? 

CHURCH CONFERENCE 

1. What is a church Conference? 

A meeting of the membrs and min- 
isters, for the transaction of Church 
business. 

2. Who presides over the Confer- 
ence? 

The preacher in charge. 

3. How often does it meet? 

On stations once a month, circuits 
every three months. 

4. What is the object of Church 
Conference? 

So all members may know what is 
done in church work, and what is 
needed to be done. 

5. At what time does it convene? 
At the call of the minister. 

6. Is any record kept of the pro- 
ceedings? 

Yes. A secretary is elected annual- 
ly. 

7. How do the stewards find the 
Church Conference useful? 

In giving correct information con- 
cerning the financial condition of the 
church. 

8. What interest have the poor in 
this Conference? 

Here inquiries may be made as to 
what is being done for the relief of 
the poor. 

9. How can the Church Conference 
be helpful to the Sunday school? 

By enlisting teachers and other 
workers. 

10. What is the main end of Church 
Conference? 

To put all the members to work for 
Christ. 

11. Can a true Church of Christ con- 
sist of preachers alone? 

No. A true church consists of many 
persons with various gifts, but of one 
spirit. 

12. Can all do something for the 
glory of God? 

Yes; all can do something. 

MISSIONS 

1. Who is a missionary? 

One sent to teach, preach or do oth- 
er Christian work. 

2. What is a foreign mission? 

A foreign country to which these 
Christian workers are sent. 

3. By whom are missionaries sent? 
By organizations called boards which 

usually represent some branch of the 
Christian church. 

4. When was the Missionary Board 
of Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
organized? 

In 1845. 

5. How is this board selected? 
The members are elected by our 

General Coneference. 

6. How are the affairs of the Board 
managed? 

By a secretary elected by the Gen- 
eral Conference, acting under the di- 
rection of the Board. 

7. How are the funds derived for 
the support of the Board? 

By collections taken in all the con- 
gregations, special donations and be- 
quests. 

8. What was the amount collected 
last year for the Board? 

9. In how many countries have we 
established missions? 

Six countries. 

10. Name the countries and date of 
opening. 

China, 1848; Mexico, 1873; Brazil, 
1876; Japan, 1886, Korea, 1896; Cuba, 
1898. 

11. Who was the first missionary 
to China? 

Dr. Charles Taylor, 1848. 

12. How many missionaries have 
we now in China? 

(Continued Next Week) 




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NEWS NOTES 

— Senator Bailey, of Texas, will de- 
liver the annual address before the 
State Bar Association at its meeting in 
June. 

— Judge Boyd has appointed A. H. 
Price, of Salisbury, standing master 
in equity for this district. 

— Rev. James Long, former pastor of 
the Baptist Church at Morganton, has 
accepted a call to Dunn. 

— In this year of our Lord nineteen 
hundred and eleven our government 
is spending 70 per cent, of its total 
revenue in paying pensions and in 
keeping up the army and navy. Over 
two-thirds of our revenue is soaked up 
by wars of the past and imaginary 
wars of the future. Assuredly there 
is need to preach the doctrine of peace 
on earth. — Ex. 

— Mr. Moore Pharr, who died in 
Charlotte a few weeks ago, left an es- 
tate valued at about $35,000, which will 
be divided among his brothers and 
sisters. 

— Rev. Dr. J. D. Hammond, late Sec- 
retary of the Board of Education of 
the M. E. Church, South, was formally 
inaugurated as president of Payne In- 
stitute, August, Ga., on Friday, Jan- 
uary 5th. 

— Mr. J. Tilden Hedrick, of Lexing- 
ton, has offered to build a Sunday 
school building to cost not less than 
$6,000 for the First Reformed Church 
of that town on condition that the 
church buy a lot for the purpose. 

— Mr. G. L. Jones, of Macon county, 
Assistant Attorney General, has re- 
signed that position and Mr. Thos. H. 
Calvert,, of Raleigh, has been appoint- 
ed as his successor by Attorney Gen- 
eral Bickett. 

— A half-million young men and wo- 
men of Kansas over 21 years of age 
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their State. Kansas puts more value 
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per capita valuation of her assessed 
property, and has fewer prisoners in 
her jails and fewer inmates in her 
lunatic asylums than any whiskey 
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— The North Carolina Railroad Co. 
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The majority of the stock in the com- 
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— Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, 
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North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws 
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Greensboro, N. C, as mail matter of 
the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.50 

Six months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 
per year. 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, (Inc.) 

D. B. Coltrane, President Concord 

Aev. J. R. Scroggs, v-Prus Charlotte 

N. L. Eure, Secretary Greensboro 

VV. G. Bradshaw High P^int 

T. C. Hoyle Grcensboio 



♦ Quarterly Meetings 

!.««««»».»»... ............ 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT 

D. Atkins, Presiding Elder 
Weaverville, N. C. 

Piltmore and Mt. Pleasant Jan. 13-14 

Bethel Jan. 14 

Mars Hill, Beach Glen Jan. 20-21 

Marshall, Marshall Jan. 27-k8 

Hot Springs Jan. 2S-29 

Central FeD. 4 

Haywood Feb. 4 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 

J. R. Scroggs, Presiding Elder 
Chanotte, N. C. 

Morven, Bethel Jan. 13-14 

VVadesboro, Wadesboro jan. 14-15 

Prospect, Bethlehem Jan.- 20 

Monroe, Central Jan. 21 

Monroe, N. Monroe Jan. 21 

Ansoriville, Ansonville Jan. 27-28 

Lilesville, Lilesville Jan. 28-29 

Marsh ville, Marshville Feb. 3-4 

Polkton, Polkton Feb. 4-5 

Unionville, Zion Feb. 10-11 

Derita, Derita Feb. 17 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT 
J. E. Gay, Presiding Elder 
Frankin, N. C. 
Dillsboro and Sylva Circuit, at Sylva, 

Jan. 13-14 

Webster Circuit, at Webster, ..Jan. 20-21 

Andrews Jan. 27-28 

Judson Circuit, at Judson Feb. 3-4 

Murphy Circuit, at Roger's Feb. 10-11 

Murphy Station Feb. 11-12 

Waynesville Circuit, at Ledford's, 

Feb. 17-18 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT 
W. R. Ware, Presiding Elder 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Coleridge Circuit, Concord Jan. 13-14 



MORGANTON DISTRICT 
R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 

Marion, at night Jan. 12-li 

McDowell, at Murphy's Chapel, 

Jan. 13-14 
North Catawba, at Capernaum, 

Jan. 12, and 3 p. m., 14 

Bakersville, at Bakersville Jan. 20-21 

Spruce Pine, at Mt. Vernon . .Jan. 27-28 

Table Rock, at Oak Hill .• Feb. 3-* 

Morganton Station, at night .'.Feb. 2-4 
Morganton Circuit, at Gilboa, Feb. 10-11 
Connelly Springs and Rutherford Col- 
lege, at Harmony, Feb. 17-18 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT 
R. M. Taylor, Presiding Elder 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Dobson, Stony Knoll Jan. 14-15 

Jonesville, Jonesville Jan. 21-22 

Elkin Station Jan. 22-23 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain, 

Jan. 28-29 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 
M. H. Vestal, Presiding Elder 
North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

N. Wilkesboro Circuit, Miller's Creek, 

Jan. 13-14 

Wilkes Circuit, Beulah Jan. 20-21 

North Wilkesboro Station Jan. 28-29 

Wilkesboro Station Feb. 4-5 

SALISBURY DISTRICT 
J. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Bethel— Big Lick, Bethel Jan. 13-14 

Concord, Central Jan. 14-15 

Concord Circuit, Olivet Jan. 20-21 

Concord, Forest Hill Jan. 21-22 

Woodleaf Circuit, Woodleaf Jan. 27-28 

Mount Pleasant, at Mount Pleasant, 

Feb. 3-4 

Salem Feb. 10-11 

New London at New London ..Feb. 17-18 



SHELBY DISTRICT 
S. B. Turrentine, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

Bessemer City, Bessemer City, Jan. 13-14 
King's Mountain and ElBethel, 

King's Mountain, Jan. 13-14 

Belwood, Palm Tree Jan. 20-21 

South Fork, Plateau Jan. 27-28 




IS ASSURED !F YOU USE 




ertilizers 



Tel! Your Dealer You Must Have 
The American Agricultural Chemical Company Fertilizers 

Factories located throughout the North and West Southern 
Factories and Sales Offices at 

Norfolk, Va. Columbia, S. C. Spartanburg, S. C. Savannah, Ga, 

Jacksonville, Fla. Pensacoia, Fla. Wilmington, N. C. Montgomery, Ala, 



Pecan Trees 



Grafted to paper-shel! variety, were carefully grown by us for our own 
planting, but on account of not getting land ready for them this season, we 
offer them for sale. 

Other Nurseries are already cleaned upon Pecan Trees, although the 
season lasts until March. Ours is now the only complete stock in the whole 
country. 

Grafted trees begin bearing in a few years and continue for generations. 
Nothing increases the value of a Southern farm like a Pecan Orchard, which 
in a few years is worth $1,000 per acre. 

Every land owner should plant at least a few pecans. They are the 
surest, safest and most profitable investment. Ten acres means a fortune 
laid by for old age. 

No other section of our country has such an opportunity as this. 
Take advantage of it now, and send at once for cur Price List. 

AMERICAN PECAN COMPANY, 



PALATKA, 



FLORIDA 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT 
Lee T. Mann, Presiding Elder 
Lenoir, N. C. 
First Round 

Maiden, St. Paul Jan. 14-15 

Newton Jan. 14-15 

Caldwell, Hudson Jan. 20-21 

Granite Falls Jan. 21-2i 

Lenoir Ct., South Lenoir Jan. 27-28 

Lenoir Jan. 2S-2a 

Whitnel, Whitnel. 3 p. m Jan. 28-29 

Mooresville Ct., Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Davidson Feb. 4-5 

Mooresville Feb. 11-12 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT 
L. T. Cordell, Presiding Elder 
Waynesville, N. C. 
First Round 

Sulphur Springs, Pleasant Hill, 

Jan. 13-14 

Spring Creek, Spring Creek . .Jan. 20-21 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Jan. 27-28 

JMI1 River. Avery's Creek Feb. 3-4 

Fines Creek, Fines Creek Feb. 10-11 

Brevard Circuit, Rosman Feb. 17-18 

Brevard Station Feb. 24-25 



WINSTON DISTRICT 
Plato Durham, Presiding Elder 
Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

| Linwood, Bethel Jan. 13-14 

! Lexington Jan. 14-15 

Davidson, Good Hope Jan. 20-21 

! Lewisville, Sharon Jan. 27-2S 

: Grace Jan. 28-29 

Davie, Hardison Feb. 3-4 

Mocksville Feb. 4-5 

Cooleemee Feb. 4-5 

Kernersville, Kernersville ....Feb. 10-11 
; Southside and Salem, Salem Feb. 11 



TERRIBLE PICTURE OF SUFFER- 
ING 

Clinton, Ky. — Mrs. M. T. McElroy, 
in a letter from Clinton writes: "For 
six years, I was a sufferer from female 
troubles. I could not eat and could 
not stand on my feet, without suffer- 
ing great pain. Three of the best doc- 
tors in the state said I was in a criti- 
cal condition, and going down hill. I 
lost hope. After using Cardui a week, 
I began to improve. Now I feel bet- 
ter than in six years." Fifty years of 
success, in actual practice, is positive 
proof that Cardui can always be relied 
on for relieving female weakness and 
disease. "Why not test it for yourself? 
Sold by all druggists. 



I WILL MAKE YC5 
PROSPEROUS 

If you are honest and ambitious write n 
today. No matter where you live or wli. 
sgjv your occupation, X w ill teach you the Re 
i I Fstii.tr. business by mail ; appoint you Speei 
U Representative of my Company in yourtuwi 
W start tqu in a profitable business of your owl 
^ftnd help you make big money at ouce. 

Unuaust opportunity for men wlthoi 
Capital to become independent for lift 
Valuable Book and full particulars FREI 
Write today. 

NATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE REAITY Ct] 

Present ffaahlngton, P. C3. 




January 11, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



How to get Rid 
of Catarrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 

Those who suffer from Catarrh 
know its miseries. There is no netu 
of this suffering. You can get rid 61. 
it by a simple, safe, inexpensive hoau 
treatment discoveied by Dr. Blosser 
who, for over thirty-six years, has be'ei. 
treating catarrh successfully. 

His treatment is unlike any other. 
It is not a spray, douche, salve, cream, 
or inhaler, but is a more direct ana 
thorough treatment than any of these. 
It cleans out the head, nose, throat 
and lungs so that you can again 
breathe freely and sleep without that 
stopped-up feeling that all catarrh 
sufferers have. It heals the diseased 
mucous membranes and arrests the 
foul discharge, so that you will not 
be constantly blowing your nose and 
spitting, and at the same times does 
not poison the system and ruin the 
stomach as internal medicines do. 

If you want to test this treatment 
without cost, send your address to Dr. 
J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton St., Atlanta, 
Ga., and he will send you by return 
mail enough of the medicine to satis- 
fy you that it is all he claims for it 
as a remedy for catarrh, catarrhal 
headaches, catarrhal deafness, asth- 
ma, bronchitis, colds and all catarrhal 
complications. He will also send you 
free an illustrated booklet. Write him 
immediately. 

NOT AN EXPERIMENT 

Paint Lick, Ky. — Mrs. Mary Free- 
man, of this place, says: "Before I 
commenced to take Cardui, I suffered 
so much from womanly trouble! 1 
was so weak that I was down on my 
back nearly all the time. Cardui has 
done me more good than any medicine 
I ever took in my life. I can't possibly 
praise it too highly." You need not 
be afraid to take Cardui. It is no new 
experiment. For fifty years it has 
been found to relieve headache, back- 
ache, and similar womanly troubles. 
Composed of gentle-acting, herb in- 
gredients, Cardui builds up the 
strength, preventing much unneces- 
sary pain. Try it for your troubles, 
today. 



C Fine POST CARDS 

^* tiend only 2c stamp and 
celve 5 very tinest Gold Embossed 
Post Cards KREE, to Introduce post e»>d offer. 
Capita Card Co., Dept. 146, Topeka, Kan. 



FREE 



Gj to Europe at Our Expense tlZ»™s s o° 

small parties. Write tO'lay for plan and pro- 
grams. Holy Land Tours. Highest references. 
Extensive travel nnd good income. 
REV. GE0XG£ NASQN, Box, J 32., Wilmington, Del. 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

General Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and Deposit 

Company of Maryland 
108 North Elm Street 'Phone 44 



DR. ELDERS' TOBACCO BOON BANISHES all 
forms of Tobacco Habit in 72 to 120 hours. A posi- 
tive, quick and permanent relief. Easy to take. 
No craving for Tobacco after the first dose. One 
to three boxes for all ordinary cases. "We guaran- 
tee results in every case or refund money. Send 
for our free booklet giving full information* 
Elders' Sanatarium. Dept. 60 St. Joseph, Ho. 



It may be proved with much cer- 
tainty, that God id tends no man to 
live in this world without working; 
but it seems no less evident that He 
intends every man to be happy In his 
work. It was written: "In the sweat 
of the brow," but It was never written 
"In the breaking of thy heart." — Rus- 
kin. 



Our Dead 



COLLEY 

James A. Colley, son of James C. 
Colley and Heniietta F. Colley was 
.orn in Ciarlotte County, Va., March 
.:2nd, 1828, moved with his parents to 
.ockingham County, N. C, 1847, and 
Jied October 29, 1911, age 83 years, 7 
months and 7 days. He was converted 
it the age of 16 years, joined the M. 
J3, Church, South, and was a faithful 
and loyal member through life. He 
was a liberal exhorter for years and 
a good worker in his church. He will 
oe very much missed. Also he was a 
member o fthe Masonic order for 50 
years; was buried with Masonic hon- 
ors at his home church thathe loved 
so well. The funeral service was con- 
ducted by Rev. W. F. Elliott. He is 
survived by one daughter, one brother 
and sister, four grand children and 
several great grandchildren. The 
writer was his pastor for three years. 
He was a sweet-spirited good old man. 
He was laid away at Eden church to 
rest till Jesus comes to make up his 
jewels. Peace to his remains. God 
bless the bereaved ones. 

L. T. Hendren. 



YOUNG 

Elizabeth Young, wife of James 
Young, was born June 1, 1842, died 
Dec. 8, 1911. She leaves a husband 
and one child, also many relatives to 
mourn their loss. Was a member of 
the Methodist church for fifty years 
and a faithful Christian to the end. 

J. C. Harmon. 



Don't Let Your 
Trees Die 

Like many other valuable things in this world, 
many of us do not appreciate our irees until they 
are gone. How much more beautiful was our 
home before that majestic oak at the porch corner 
died; how much more inviiing was our gateway 
before death came to the willow that guarded it. 
There are but few perfect trees, and if you but 
knew it, youi trees are probably in a degenerate 
condition. Decay is eating away the heart of one, 
another has broken limbs that are rotting, and 
another has a split fork. 

Save Them With the Aid 

Of The Davey Tree Experts 

John Davey is father of Tree Surgery, and his representatives are 
experts. They are to the tree whatthe dentist is to the tooth or the 
surgeon to the human body. The above illustration shows how they have 
doctored a tree, cleaning out the decay and filliug thecavity. Their treat- 
ment restores perfect health to diseased and crippled trees, and adds 
years to their life. Davey Tree Surgery is a service that your trees require. 

Saving the Trees of the South 



HAMMACK 

Adeline Walker Hammack was born 
Nov. 15, 1843 and departed this life at 
4:30 a. m. Dec. 26, 1911. She was mar- 
ried to Thos. B. Hammack December 
17, 1866. Two sons blessed this union, 
who with the husband survive, also 
two brothers, J. D. and J. R. Young 
with a host of relatives and friends 
who mourn their loss. 

She united with Love's church when 
about 17 years of age and remained a 
consistent member for more than half 
a century. We all doubt not that our 
loss is her eternal gain. 

J. C. Harmon. 



MORRIS 

Martha nAn Morris, wife of O. P. 
Morris, wasborn October 10, 1867, died 
December 4, 1911. She was married to 
O. P. Morris November 15, 1883. This 
union was blessed with ten children 
who are living. 

She was converted and joined Beth- 
lehem church in 1879 and some time j 
later her membership was moved to 
Love's church. She was loved by all ! 
who knew her and tried to do what | 
was right toward all people. 

J. C. Harmon. 



GOD'S GOODNESS 

God is more than good! He is wise 
so that he can guide his goodness; 
and he is strong so that he can enforce 
his goodness. He is h«iv! That is 
the "fixed trust" for the soul. No 
wonder Whittier writes: 
"I dimly guess from blessings known 

Of greater out of sight, 
And with the chastened Psalmist's 
own 

His judgments, too, are right." 

— Selected. 



THIS WILL INTEREST MANY 

F. W. Parkhurst, the Boston pub- 
lisher, says that if anyone afflicted 
with rheumatism in any form, neural- 
gia or kidney trouble, will send their 
address to him at 701 Carney Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., he will direct them to 
a perfect cure. He has nothing to sell 
or give; only tells you how he was 
cured after years of search for relief. 




3 have published a book. "Saving 
jTreesofthe South," telling how 
i can do for your trees what we 
ve done for those of hundreds of 
jer Southern Homes. Sent free 
upon request. From December 
to May, the Davey Tree Experts 
work from Texasto the Atlantic. 
Perhaps we can have one of 
them examine your trees without 
obligation or cost to you— if you 
let us hear from you at 
once. Meniionthe number of trees you own, their 
kinds, locaiion, and their apparent condition. Re- 
member. Davey Tree Surgery is a buieme, and cannot 
be compared with the butchery of irresponsible 
"Tree Doctors." 

Write us promptly for literature 



Winthkop Normal amd Industrial School 
Rockhill, S. C 

Me. M. L. Davey 

The Davey Tree Expert Co., Kent, O. 
Dear Sir:— The trees treated t>y your rep- 
resentatives are doing: well and it 
seems that they will be saved and make 
g'ood trees. Y^urs truly, 

D. B. JOHNSON, President. 




The above is 
a splendid 
example of 
the Davey 
Method. New 
Bark is rap- 
idlycovering 
the filling. 
T|his tree 
would have 
died. 



ForTho Pull 




The race is to the strong 



have you strength for the up-stream full of life — are you 
gaining, just holding your own, or do yoa feci yourself being 
swept back by the current of circumstances? Strength is 
what you need — the strength that comes from good red blood. 

You can buy strength 

Read these extracts from letters of gratitude from those who did: 



My general health and strength havealso Improved 
and I attribute this to t.ie ujo oC Milam. — W. I£. 
Grtgis. Danville, Va. Gained 45 pounds of solid llesl). 
—Harvey Dingers, Kerrellsburg. W. Va. Have taken 
only a few bottles of Milam but feel stronger and 
better, more aeti ve and able to stand up under my 
work.— Hew II. D. Guerrant, Danville, Va. I gained 
8 1-2 pounds on 1 1-2 bottles of Milam.— T. B. Stalna- 
ker, Chane^ton, W. Va. My strength lias returned 
and I feel better than I have In 20 years, thanks to 
Miiain. — Bennle Jones. Newport News, Va. Took six 
bottles of Milam, feel like a new man.— Claude Cur- 
ling. 540 15. Mala St.. Norfolk. Va. Am on my fourth 
bottle of Milam and can now eat ad I can get, and 



welih more tuan lever did In my life.— J. M. Tlnark 

K ad Lord, Va. Alter using seven bottles I find myself 
I i perfect health, fine appetlie and feeling better 
titan in 23 years.— Mrs. H. Reynolds, Crltz, Va. X 
have taken six bottles of Milam and can truthfully 
s."7 I am feeling better than I everrememher before. 
Myrtle L Sen o fie Id, with Wemple. Elierson & Co., 
Washington. D. C. Milam benefitted me in almost 
every way, It is a magnillcent tonic.— Harry W. Hol- 
land. Imp. Tobacco Co., Danville. Va. I believe 
Milam to be the greatest medicine yet discovered 
lor nervous and run-down systems.— T. 6hep Brown, 
Norfolk. Va. 0 3 



Ask your druggist about the guaranteed remedy. 




YOU CAN AFFORD 



a new Song Book ill your Church 
or Sunday School, and one for 
every person ; "FAMILIAR SONGS 
OF THE GOSPEL," Round or Shape Notes, for $3 for 100. Words and music, 83 very best 
Bonys. Sample copv 5 cents. E. A. K. HACKETT. i 14 North Wayne Street. Fort Wayne. Ind. 





CAPITAL STOCK, $30,000 
A school with a reputation for doing high-grade work. 

One o r the host en'ilpned bnslnpss schools In the. a outh. TITK r.AnOEST. The strongest 
fitculty. MflR R OR \nUATFs [\ posi rTOVS than all other business schools In the State. Book- 
keeping. Shorthand nnd English. No vacation. Write for handsome catalogue, 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE, Raleigh, N. C, or Charlotte, N. C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Penmanship, etc., by mail. Send for Home Study circular 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 11, 1912 




Makes Hens Lay 



It stimulates the eprc producing organs and by re- 
moving the cause, prevents and cures all poultry 
diseases. When you give your hens Falrfleld'B Ulood 
Tonic and Egg Producer, you are on the only sure way 
to poultry profits. 

Fairfield's Blood Tonics 

An Individual Preparation for All A nimals 
Blood Tonic for Horses Only Egg Producer for Hens Only 
Milk Produce r for Cattle Only Blood Tonic for Hogs Only 

Each scientifically compounded to meet the Individual 
requirements of each kind o£ animal. Don't make the 
mistake of. using the old style "Cure All" conditioners. 

These $1.00 Books FREE 

Information In those books Is very valuable to every 
owner ot hens, horses, cattle ~~ 
and hogs — easily worth a 
dollar each— either or both 
free for name of your dealer. 

FAIRFIELD MFG. CO. 
G08 8. Delaware A v., l'hllo.,I'«. 



r t 7 Write at once— 

Uealers give customers 

Fairfield's, the best tonics for 
animals — good proposition — easy sales. 




THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

Insurance 



Greensboro, North Carolina 
308 1-2 South Elm St. 
Phone 163 



Make Your Money 
Work for You 



Invest your savings in divldent paying 
stocks and bonds. We sell gilt edge se- 
curities, of sound, safe and prosperous 
Banks in North Carolina and South Car- 
olina for cash or EASY PAYMENT 
PLAN. .No speculations, but a reliable 
Investment. We also sell State, County 
and Municipal Bonds, and First Mort- 
gages on improved Real Estate. Full in- 
formation free on request. Write us 
NOW. 

SAVINGS BANK & TRUST COMPANY, 
Bond Dept., Charlotte, N. C. 



CUT 
FLOWERS 

FOR 

ALL OCCASIONS 

Our florists are capable of 
producing the most beau- 
tiful designs for funerals 
when fresh and beautiful 
flowers are wanted. Out 
of town orders have prompt 
attention. 

SUMMIT AVENUE 
GREENHOUSES 

HOWARD GARDNER, Proprietor 
Greensboro, N. C. 



WEPAY$80AM0NTH SALARY 

and furnish rig and all expenses to tntrod-ice oas- 
Saaranteed stock and poultry powders; moiwy-t)2c'.: 
guarantee; outl't fr«»e; new plan; steady work. A*idre«> s 
BIOLER CO., X 70S, SPRINGFIELD, ILOM.-U. 



HOME MISSION DEPARTMENT 

(Conti uni) w.ow Pk.e Sink) 



the prodigal boy lias come back to 
the father's house aud been forgiven, 
not only is he forgiven and his sin 
forgotten, but he is free to enter any 
work and to perform any service for 
God and humanity. But is it so in the 
case of the girl? No, she has never a 
chance to again live her life unless 
she can keep the terrible secret, know- 
ing full well that if the truth becomes 
known, the end has come to her use- 
fulness. The women of the Home 
Mission Society, realizing this, estab- 
lished the Ann Browder Home, a hav- 
en of refuge for wayward girls. In the 
fifteen years since this home was es- 
tablished, over 1200 girls have been 
cared lor, and of that number 85 per 
cent, or more than 1,000 girls are use- 
ful Christian women today. All girls 
entering this home are required to re- 
main for two years, as it requires time 
to rebuild character. 

In San Francisco we have the Ko- 
rean Mission, and not only have the 
Koreans in America been influenced 
but Koreans in other parts of the 
world. Some of the converts in this 
mission have gone to Siberia and Mex- 
ico and report several hundred con- 
versions. There are about 1,500 Ko- 
reans in this country who came to 
America hoping to get an education 
or a fortune. They have no home. 
Knowing this, the Home Mission So- 
ciety has furnished a home to which 
may come to worship, read, learn, and 
rest. This department has proven so 
effective that during three years 600 
Koreans have found refuge in this 
home. These people, when converted 
to Christianity, are very strong, ear- 
nest and ardent Christians. It is said 
that wherever Jews go they go with 
Judaism; wherever Greeks go they go 
with philosophy; wherever Romans 
go, they go with the Law; but let us 
add that wherever Christian Koreans 
go they go with Christianity. 

The kindergarten and primary school 
for Japanese at Mary Helm Hall at 
Alamada, California, is a source of 
gratification and pleasure to those 
who stand back of the work, also the 
night school for Japanese has been 
fruitful in the conversion of men, some 
of whom are preparing to go back as 
missionaries to their own people.- 

As an educational inspiration the 
Wesley House has stood as a beacon- 
light in our southern cities where they 
have been established. Most of them 
carry some phase of night school 
work, and all have clubs which have 
as their object the creating of lofty 
ideals and development of discerning 
faculties in those who frequent them. 
The Wesley Home has furnished 
school facilities for neglected children 
and today there are young people who 
are making an honorable living be- 
cause of the opportunities and the pa- 
tient efforts of our workers to enlarge 
their lives. In some Wesley Houses 
the foundation for culture has been 
laid by the music and art lessons, 
with choral work and special lessons 
given by some co-operating worker 
through the Wesley House. 

With the brief mention of the great 
good being accomplished in the in- 
stances cited above, it should be suf- 
ficient incentive to us to go forward 
with greater zeal in the work of our 
Home Mission Society, that the good 
influences set at work may be accel- 
erated, and new lines of work project- 
ed, relying for guidance and sustain- 
ing grace upon Him who hath promis- 
ed "Lo I am with you always." 

Mrs. L. N. j"5uckner. 



The average man does not go Into 
the dairy business because he likes 
the work. He takes it up because it 
is profitable and means soil improve- 
ment and better crop yields. It is 
hard, regular work, but it pays well 
for the hard work and intelligence put 
into it, and any ambitious man is 
willing to do hard work if the rewards 
are sufficient. — Ex. 



Ask Your Doctor 

You could not please us better than to ask your doctor about 
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral for coughs, colds, croup, bronchitis. 
Thousands ot families always keep it in the house. The approval 
of their physician and the experience of many years have given 
them great confidence in this cough medicine. MfS: 




In the New Home 

You want the best when starting in the new home. Above 
all, you want that home to be snug and warm and comfortable. 

You are sure of warmth and comfort with a Perfection 
Smokeless Oil Heater. 

The Perfection is the best and most reliable heater made. 

It is a sort of portable fireplace. 

It is ready night and day.' Just strike a match and light 
the wick. The Perfection is all aglow in a minute. 

The Perfection 03 Heater does not smell nor smoke — a patent 
automatic device prevents that It can be carried easily from room to 
loom and is equally suitable for any room in the house. Handsomely 
finished, with nickel trimmings; drums of either turquoise-blue enamel 
or plain steel 

Alk your dealer lo show 70a a Perfection 
PjP^J^^P^^yj^^^T^l Sroolcel.-KO.I Heater, or write (or descriptive 



Smokeless 



circular direct to any agency of 

Standard Oil Company 

(Incorporated) 




Bookkeeping and Shorthand taught by skilled specialists In all departments.! Either course 835 
Combined 865. Enroll now and save 815 to $25 on your course. 

Address the School at . GREENSBORO. N. C. 



Complete 
only f 




wm 

Burns M^^g^ 
Woodors 
Coal 



JUST SEND ME ONE DOLLAR 

and I will ship C. O. D. to any railroad station in the 
U. S. this fine Willard Steel Range. Any one can say 
they have the best range in the world, but I will furnish 
the evidence and leave the verdict to you. After you 
examine this range, if you are satisfied in every way, 
pay agent $14.00 and freight, and you become the possessor 
of the best range in the world for the money. This range 
has six 8- inch lids; 17- inch oven; 15-gal. reservoir; large 
warming closet; top cooking surface 30x34 ins. Guaranteed 
to reach you in perfect order. Shipping weight 400 lbs. 
Thousands in use and every one of them giving satisfac- 
tion. Write for full description and testimonials. 

WM. Q. WILLARD 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



No. 96 WILLARD BLDG. 
320 CHESTNUT STREET 




Hardwood Mantels 

THAT PLEASE 

Grates and Tiles 

THAT HARMONIZE 



j |Get Our Catalogue. Free to 
those who are interested. 



Odell Mantel Co., 

(Owned by Odell Hardware Co.) 
GREENSBORO. ■ • • N. C 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as Information and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:30 a. m. No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special, through Pullman sleeping 
and observation cars New York to 
Birmingham and Kichmond to Bir- 
mingham. Dining car service. 

12:48 a. m. No. 32 daily, the Southern's 
Southeastern Limited, Pullman 
sleeping cars from Jacksonville, 
Augusta and Aiken to New York. 
Dining car service. 
12:45 a. m. No. 112 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Pullman sleeping car 
from Winston-Salem to Raleigh 
open at 9:15 p. m. 

2:10 a. m. No. 30 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman sleeping and ob- 
servation cars from Birmingham 
and Asheville to New York and 
Birmingham to Richmond. Dining 
car service. 

2:25 a. m., No. 31, The Southern's South- 
eastern Limited, Pullman sleeping 
cars from New York to Jackson- 
ville, Aiken and Augusta and New 
York to Asheville. Day coaches. 
Dining car service. 

3:45 a. m. No. 45 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and 
points south. 

7:10 a. m. No. 8, dally local for Rich- 
mond, connecting at Danville with 
Norfolk train. 

7:20 a. m. No. 37 daily, New York 
Atlanta and New Orleans Limited. 
Pullman drawing room, sleeping 
cars and club and observation 
cars New York to New Orleans. 
Pullman sleeping car New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte and Macon. 
Pullman chair car Greensboro to 
Montgomery. Solid Pullman train. 
Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Durham 
and Raleigh. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11, daily local through 
to Atlanta, sleeping car from Rich- 
mond to Charlotte and Norfolk to 
Asheville. 

7:45 a. m. No. 154 dally except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

J:15 a. m. No. 237 daily for Winston- 
Salem and daily except Sunday for 
North Wilkesboro. Pullman sleep- 
ing car Raleigh to Winston-Salem. 

9:30 a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 
and points North. 

9:30 a. m. No. 144 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro, handles Atlanta-Raleigh 
sleeping car. 
12:30 p. m. No. 21 daily for Asheville, 
Waynesville and local points, 
handles coaches and chair car 
through to Asheville and Waynes- 
ville. 

12:50 p. m. No. 130 daily for Sanford, 

Fayettevllle and Wilmington. 
12:55 p. m. No. 7 daily for Charlotte and 
points south. 

1:40 p. m. No. 36 daily U. S. Mail for 
Washington, New York and points 
north, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars from Birmingham and New 
Orleans to New York and Pullman 
sleeping car Asheville to Richmond. 
Pullman chair car Greenville to 
Wshington, day coaches, dining 
car service. 

2:20 p. m. No. 207 dally except Sunday 
for Winston-Salem, making con- 
nection for North Wilkesboro. 

2:30 p. m. No. 151 daily except Sunday 
for Madison. 

S:30 p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

S:35 p. m. No. 132 daily for Sanford. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Handles chair car to 
Goldsboro. 

4:55 p. m. No. 131 daily for Mt. Airy. 

«:10 p. m. No. 35 daily U. S. Fast Mail for 
Atlanta and points south. Pullman 
sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans and Birmingham and sleep- 
ing car Richmond to Asheville 
which can be occupied until 7 
o'clock a. m. Pullman chair car 
Washington to Greenville, S. C., 
dining car service. 

S:35 p. m. No. 235 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta. 
Sleeping car and coaches to At- 
lanta. 

10:30 p. m. No. 38 daily New York Atlanta 
and New Orleans Limited. Pull- 
man sleeping cars and club and ob- 
servation cars New Orleans, Ma- 
con, Asheville and Charlotte to 
to New York and Pullman chair 
car Montgomery to Greensboro. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car 
service. 

18:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Winston-Sa- 
lem. 

10:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local for Rich- 
mond, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars for Richmond and Norfolk. 

E. H. COAPMAN, V. P. and G. M. 

Washington, D. C. 
S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M., 

Washington, D. C. 
H. F. CARY, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, D. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
W. H. McGLAMERY, P. & T. A., 

Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATED WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assort- 
ment of fine Pocket Booka, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the oldest 
Leading F\rn. In the city. Everything Is 
guarantee. 

SCHfFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

, LEADING JEWELERS 




AN ECONOMICAL^ 




TO INCREASE YOUR CROPS 



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Send Today for Our Free 1912 Almanac and 
Fertilizer Book. 



PLANTERS FERTILIZER & PHOSPHATE CO., i 



Charleston, S.C. 



m < 

m 



WE WANT 

to help every person striv- 
ing for a musical education 
to secure an artistic piano. 
For that reason we open 
our own warerooms and 
sell direct to the home, 
thus eliminating all in- 
between profits. :: :: 

Write STIEFE if you are thinking 
of buying 

SOUTHERN WAREROOM 

5 West Trade St. 
Charlotte, - - - - N. C. 
C. H. W1LMOTH. Manager 



Methodist Benevolent Jfs^ ociatton 

The Connectional Brotherhood of Ministers and Laymen. „ Life or Term Certificates foi 
9500 to $2,000. Benefits payable at death, old age, or disability. 9100,000.00 paid to 
widows, orphans, and disabled. $14,000.00 reserve funcL^Write for rates, blanks, etc} 

•k H. SHUMAKER, Secretary Nashville, Tennessee' 




FROST PROOF CABBAGE PLANTS 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY CUSTOMERS 

FROM THE ORIGINAL CABBAGE PLANT GROWERS 



I «UBAY JERSEY WAKEFIELD. . CHARLESTON LARGE TYPE, SUCCESSION 

Th.E«rw Wakefield, TboEariiti 

Caibag. Qnwm. aj EarlieaL. 



AUGUSTA TRUCKER. SHORT STEMMED 
A little liter FLAT DUTCH. 

Plat Head Varist*. than Bnccasalon. Ltrftat and Latoil Cabbage. 



TRADEMARK 



COPYRIGHTED 




Established 1868. Paid In Capital Stock $30,000.00 

Welgrew the first FROST PROOF PLANTS in 1868. Now hare over twenty thousand satisfied 
customers. We have grown and sold more cabbage plants than ell other persons In the Southern 

tV- combined. , WHY? Because ourplants must please or we send yourmoney back. Order now: 
it is Time i to set these plants In your section to get extra early cabbage, and they are the ones 
tnat sell for the most money. 

We sow three tons of Cabbage Seed per season fS£^$Z& 

* ruit trees and ornamentals. Write for free catalog containing valuabl e Information about fruit 
and vege table growing. Prices on Cabbage Plants:— By mail Postage Paid 45 cents per 100 plants. 
By express, buyer paying express charges, which under special rate is very low: 600 tor $1.00; 1,000 
to 4,000 St. 50 per thousand; 5,000 to 9,000 $1.25 per thousand ; 10,000 and over S'lCO per thousand. 

Wm. C. Geraty Co., Box 67, Yonges Island, S. C. 




The man who is prepared always feels better. If it is to meet a rainstorm or a financial obligation, or even 
Death itself, he feels better if prepared. 

The man in the commercial world does not know just when he will want an accommodation of his banker. 
There might be a bargain offered him on which he could make big money — if he were prepared to handle 
it. Therefore the larger the bank with which you do business, the better the chance to be accommodated. 

THE AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

of GREENSBORO, N. C. 
WITH TOTAL RESOURCES OF MORE THAN 

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Deposits may be sent by check, Post Office order or registered mail. 

American E^bhange National Bank 

Gi\ ^%sboro, N. C. 
Capital, ^00,000.00 

R. G VAUGHN, Pres. J. W. S'C$*fT, Vice-Pres. F. OYLES, Cashier F. H. NICHOLSON, Ass't Cashier 



tie: thy camel 



One night, in the desert, Mohammed and one of his followers came to an oasis and halted for the night. After 
they dismounted, Mohammed's follower said, 

" I will loose my camel and trust him to Allah." 

" Nay, my friend," replied Mohammed, " Tie thy camel and trust him to Allah." 

You, my friend, who have a family, and for whom you have made no provision after you are gone, let us reason 
together. Have you tied your camel ? Have you protected your family against the calamity of your death by a life 
insurance policy ? If you have not you are no wiser than the follower of Mohammed who loosed his camel and trusted 
him to Allah. 

Southern Life (Q. Trust Co. 

of Greensboro, N. C. 



Is the strongest Southern Life Insurance Company ( not writing industrial insurance ) and is the only life insurance 
Company organized in the last twenty years which has been successful enough to go on an annual dividend basis. In 
addition to this, there is no other Company in the Country paying larger dividends to its policy-holders. It is a policy- 
holders' Company and has a surplus for their protection of nearly $600,000.00. 



North Carols a*™* 

Christian Advocate 

ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 



Thursday, January 18, 1912 










On with the Revival 

Methodism, or at least Southern Meth- 
odism, must decide whether she will 
remain a mighty spiritual battle line or 
become a great business, social, or civic 
corporation with its consequent eccle- 
siastical petrifaction. We rejoice that 
our chief pastors have sounded a call 
to the battle front. At least fifty thou- 
sand souls have been won to Christ 
since that bugle sounded throughout 
the Church. Would that every con- 
gregation in Southern Methodism might 
have a season of refreshing ere another 
Church year shall be born! On with 
the revival! "They that turn many to 




righteousness s 



hall 



orever. 



shine as the stars 

—Rev. Frank M. Thomas, D. D. 




The Guilford Range 



These ranges are manufactured for us under our special brand. 
We are exclusive dealers for this section. We have handled a great 
many carloads of these ranges, and believe, without question, that 
they contain the best value on the market. You do not need to pay 
an agent $65.00 or $75.00 for a Range, as a large proportion of the 
price goes for profit and selling expense, neither do you need to 
order from a catalogue house a range you have never seen. The 
long distance means delay and extra danger of damage in transpor- 
tation. Later, when you need extra parts, it will be very inconven- 
ient and expensive to obtain them, and your local merchant can sell 
you the Guilford Range at a price which will give you better value 
than you can obtain from a catalogue house. As a baker, the Guil- 
ford has no superior. You cannot buy a range which will give you 
better service, no matter how much you pay for it. Those, having 
city, or private water supply, will find it unexcelled as a water 
heater, owing to the excellent water front. It can be furnished with 
reservoir also, for use where there is no water pressure. 

If your dealer does not carry the Guilford, write us for cata- 
logue, and give us his name. We shall be glad to send our handsome 
stove catalogue, showing not only the Guilford Ranges, but stoves, 
and other useful household articles, to any interested, provided 
this paper is mentioned. 



ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Shall we turn them away, or shall wa 
build and take them in— the Methodist 
girls of North Carolina who desire to 
be educated in their own church college T 
At present we are turning them away by 
the score, but we have secured plans 
for a new dormitory ( a picture of which 
adorns this page), which we will build 
as soon as the money can be secured. 

The cost of the dormitory, furnished 
and ready for occupancy, will be $25,000. 
and we hope to secure this amount by 
the following plan: Ten churches and 
ten individuals in each conference build 
a room at a cost of $500.00 each. The re- 
maining $5000.00 to be secured in small 
contributions from a number of people. 

The name of the individual or church 
building a room will be placed on the 
door of the room so that students may 
know whose generosity thoughtfully pro- 
vided facilities for their education. 

Subscriptions may be made payable if 
desired, in four semi-annual Installments. 

Any person who will build a room, or 
is willing to contribute any amount, how- 
ever small, will confer a favor by com- 
municating with W. M. Curtis, Secretary 
and Treasurer, Greensboro, N. C. 

The following have agreed to build a 
room: 

Faculty and Students G. P. C; West 
Market Church, Greensboro, N. C; A 
member of West Market Church, Greens- 
boro, N. C.j First Methodist Church, 
Wilson, N. C; Tryon Street Methodist 
Church, Charlotte, N. C; Grace Church, 
Wilmington, N. C; Member of 5th Street 
Church, Wilmington, N. C; Member 
Grace Church, Wilmington, N. C; Mem- 
ber Methodist Church, Clay tan, N. C; 
Washington Street Church, High Point, 
N. C; Member of St. Paul's Church, 
Goldsboro, N. C. ; Miscellaneous subscrip- 
tions, $12,000.00; Total subscribed to date, 
$17,600.00. 




PROPOSED NEW DORMITORY, GREENSBORO FEMALE COLLEGE. 



An Encouraging Testimonial from a Satisfied Customer 


I had tl 

ly done, an 
less money 
Salisbur 


ie Advocate Press bind two volumes of my Clarke's Commentary. The work is neat- 
d has every appearance of durability. I am highly pleased with it. I got it done for 
than any other printing establishment would undertake to do it. 

i N. C, January 6th, 1912. OTHO J. JONES. 



ESTABLISHED 1855 



h. m. blair. Editor Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South $1.50 Per Annum in Advance 



Volume LVII. GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 18, 1912 Number 3 



| EDITORIAL 

- ; ■ . ..........«.««»«».....«»»»»»»«»« 

The assertion that during the year 1911 our gov- 
ernment spent seventy per cent, of its total reve- 
nue in paying pensions and in keepig up the army 
and navy is enough to put the sober-minded citi- 
zen in a frame of mind to consider favorably the 
proposition to submit questions of difference to 
an international court of arbitration. It ought also 
to encourage the adoption of the arbitration treaty 
now pending between this country, Great Britain 
and France. It should also promot the peace 
sentiment everywhere. "War is not only an essen- 
tially wicked method of settling disputes and dif- 
ficulties but is ruinous to the morals of the race 
in general and will eventually bankrupt a nation. 
The whole military program of the nations is out 
of harmony with the teachings of Jesus Christ and 
will have to be revised before His kingdom can be 
established. Morally, it is no more wrong for the 
individual to have his code of honor than for the 
nation to do so, yet who today would tolerate the 
duel as a method of settling individual grievances? 

• * * • 

Another view of the situation at the present 
time, calculated *o make the Christian more earnest 
in his prayer for the averting of the awful conse- 
quences of war, is the fact called to public atten- 
tion in an appeal for a real court of arbitration. 
In this appeal it is set forth that "there are more 
guns and bayonets, more bombs and shells, more 
soldiers on the land, and more ships of war upon 
the seas, than in any preceding century in the 
history of the world. More money is now expend- 
ed in getting ready for war than was spent in form- 
er times in waging war. The burden of the mili- 
tary and naval equipment is stunting and demoral- 
izing the life of the nation, and handicapping the 
progress of all humanitarian movements. Militar- 
ism is one of the gigantic evils of our day." It is, 
to say the least, remarkable that at a time when 
rulers and great leaders as well as religious teach- 
ers, are pleading as never before in the history of 
the world for peace and peaceful methods of set- 
tling all disputes the nations should be making the 
most extensive preparations for war in the history 
of the race. Those who are engaged in the work 
of promoting the peace movement are surely not 
dealing with a dead issue. May God help them 
and multiply their number. 

* » * » 

The present time is one of extraordinary demands 
upon the missionary zeal of the church. The fact 
that great opportunities, not to say demands, have 
been developing in all our mission fields has made 
the situation exceedingly trying on our boards, par- 
ticularly the officers of the boards. We might 
truthfully say that the success of the work in our 
mission fields is embarrassing. Few of our people 
in the home land have any conception of the 
changes which have taken place in China, Japan 
and Korea, many of these changes due largely to 
the effects of the gospel preached by our mission- 
aries. These changes have opened wide the doors 
of opportunity and thus have created demands more 
rapidly than the church has been willing to re- 
spond to them. The result is that our present 
board is handicapped by debt and the constant 
drain of an interest account which is really a re- 
proach to a great church. 

*. * * * 

Speaking of the debt of our Board of Missions, 
let it be understood that we are suffering in com- 
mon with other denominations. The Southern 
Presbyterian church finds itself in the same condi- 
tion and the editor of the Presbyterian Standard 
says: 



"Every day that this condition lasts is a reproach 
to our church. It :s an impeachment of as loyalty 
to Christ, of its devotion to His cause, of its con- 
cern for the salvation of the lost. We are abun- 
dantly able to pay the debt. We can pay it without 
depriving ourselves of any comforts, without touch- 
ing any investments, without cutting down any 
other expenses; we can pay it out of the waste, the 
money that we squander on knick-knacks. Half 
the money that we have thrown away on Christ- 
mas gim-cracks would have paid it. 

"Why then do we not pay it? It is a debt of 
honor, a debt of imperative and impressing obliga- 
tion, a debt we owe to the faithful missionaries, to 
the heathen dying in sin, above all to the Christ 
who owns us, and who has called us to this work. 

"What will happen if we don't pay it? We must 
dismiss the missionaries in the homeland; or we 
must curtail the work of those on the field, dis- 
missing the native workers, and cutting down the 
resources of our schools and hospitals. If we don't 
pay it, we must throw a deep shadow of disap- 
pointment and distress upon the hearts of all those 
who, in response to our prayers and pleadings, have 
given their lives to this great cause; we must 
blight the hopes and chill the ardor of those who 
have been won from heathenism, and smite with 
unspeakable disaster all our hitherto splendid and 
promising efforts. What will happen if we do not 
pay the debt is simply too appalling to be imagin- 
ed. 

* * * * 

In the effort to rid the church of this awful handi- 
cap of debt the Presbyterian women have been com- 
ing to the rescue in a most heroic way. Many of 
them have sent their jewels and other valuable 
belongings to the Board at Nashville. A committee 
is disposing of the gifts as rapidly as possible and 
forwarding the proceeds to missionaries whose sal- 
aries are overdue. As yet the gifts have not been 
sufficient to meet the deficit, and a second appeal 
has been made to the Southern women, which has 
brought many contributions, accompanied by let- 
ters of self-sacrifice and determination to sustain 
the church's efforts in the foreign field. 

- * * * * 

There is just as urgent need that the women and 
men of the M. E.- Church, South, should begin to 
display a heroic devotion to the cause of missions 
by acts of self-sacrifice. Our board is in debt and 
we are at every conceivable point falling short 
of meeting the demands of the situation. In the 
face of conditions calling for retrenchment if not 
for the recall of our workers in the field, there is 
urgent need of multiplying the number of our rep- 
resentatives and workers at the front. If these 
Presbyterian women and our Methodist women 
would consent to suspend the costly social func- 
tions of a single month and appropriate the saving 
to the relief of the situation, the problem would 
be solved. It is not our lack of means, but our 
lack of consecration which has brought us to the 
present situation. 

* ' * * * 

Oft-repeated cases of stupendous defalcation or 
other species of moral collapse seems to try the 
faith of many reople. Looking at tho state of so- 
ciety as indicated in the daily bulletin of crime we 
are constrained to say that "the days are evil." 
We do not think, however, that one's faith in the 
genuineness of Christian experience and its in- 
separable companion, staunch and reliable moral 
character, should be shaken because a prominent 
Sunday school man or a minister in some high 
place goes wrong. While these things may indi- 
cate a degenerate age they do not by any means 
discount the church or disturb the foundation stone 
of real and genuine piety. Back of every case of 
defalcation there is either the history of defective 
moral training or a period of apostasy or backslid- 
ing through the neglect of religious duties. A con- 



science trained under the tuition of what many 
are pleased to term puritanic moral teaching is 
not likely to let a man go wrong when he is old. 
The little boy who has it thoroughly inwrought in 
the fibre of his moral being that, 

"In His sight it is a sin 
To steal a penny or a pin, 

is not likely to rob a bank or embezzle the funds 
of a great corporation. However much we may 
have reason to deplore the moral failure of men 
in high places, this is no reason for discounting 
the church or for depreciating the legitimate pro- 
duct of the church, viz: unsullied religious and 
moral character. Men may fail, and do fail daily. 
"Nevertheless the foundation of God standeth 
sure." 

* * * * 

The editor of Charity and Children takes a fall- 
out with the Student Volunteer. While we are 
not prepared to go the length of Mr. Johnson's 
position for the reason that we have not looked in- 
to it, yet it suggests what we have often been about 
to remark, viz: that nearly all the modern religious 
movements have been somewhat exaggerated 
through publicity. But here is an extract from 
the editorial referred to which at least suggests 
thought: 

"We may be wholly wrong but we have never 
been able to work up any very considerable enthus- 
iasm over the Student Volunteer movement that 
has come to be so popular in our institutions of 
learning. And this is our reason: The students 
that 'volunteer' under the excitement and enthus- 
iasm created by some fervid address or pathetic 
appeal, do not go to the foreign field. Take the 
record at Meredith College for example. We are 
told that of all the great number of young women 
who were induced under the pressure of the mo- 
ment to offer themselves for work in foreign lands, 
not more than one is on the foreign field today. 
The others finding that they were swept off their 
feet at the time, in cooler moments concluded that 
they were mistaken, and what they mistook for 
a 'call' was only a transitory religious exuberance 
Really no missionary to the heathen was ever won 
to his or her work under pressure. We believe 
that a call to the foreign field is as definite and 
distinct and imperious as a call to a man to preach 
the gospel; and we have never had the least pa- 
tience with those zealots who take the business 
of the Lord into their own hands and try to com- 
pel boys and girls to enter the ministry or to go 
to China. It is too serious and sacred a matter 
to decide upon the impulse of a moment, and in 
our judgment the student volunteer movement takes 
to itself a little too much authority, and creates an 
atmosphere in which a young person is liable to 
be deceived. It is bound to have an injurious effect 
upon character to make a solemn vow that must 
afterwards be broken. If the missionaries came 
from outside the volunteers at our colleges it seems 
to us a rather clear case that the 'movement' in the 
situation is doing more harm then good. 

"It is all right and necessary for our colleges to 
be pervaded by the mission spirit and that the 
student be furnished- with missionary information 
as well as inspiration, but that is one thing, and 
the pressure to make them promise to go to the 
foreign field which they break later on, is quite 
another thing. Our information about this matter 
comes from the students themselves. We know 
nothing personally about it, of course." 



The trustees of the Peabody Educational Fund, 
through their officers, are calling for a contribution 
of $1,000,000 to supplement a fund of $500,000 which 
they propose to give for the endowment of the 
George Peabody College for Teachers, at Nashville, 
Tenn. 



Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



TAPPING UP THE TEAMS 

We are glad to be able to say that we are not 
the only editor in Southern Methodism disposed to 
crack the whip behind the teams at least once a 
year in order to pull our circulation up a little 
higher in the hundreds. It is now dawning on the 
church that the only method by which we can se- 
cure and hold a circulation for our papers is to 
keep pushing the canvass. The editor of the Bal- 
timore Southern Methodist says: 

"Is an earnest, honest effort to increase the cir- 
culation of the Conference paper several times a 
year any less a duty than to make the same kind 
of effort to raise the Conference collections? The 
matter as to what he thinks of the paper no more 
enters into this question than what he thinks of 
the Conference collections. These are not open 
questions. The discipline makes it his duty to 
give his strongest and most intelligent support to 
each because it is the unqualified conviction of the 
General Conference that their success is necessary 
to the prosperity of the church and the kingdom. 

"But what is his strongest and most intelligent 
support? Making a statement once or twice a year, 
somewhat like this: 'Brethren, I want to call your 
attention to the Conference paper; if any of you 
want it, call on Brother Slowman, of 23 Sleepy St., 
and give him your subscription, and I'll see that 
you get the paper." What proportion of the Confer- 
ence collections would be raised if nothing more 
were done in behalf? You put forth definite pur- 
poseful efforts to raise your Conference collections 
and you get them; the same sort of efforts, and we 
are under obligations from which we cannot escape 
to employ such only, would result in largely increas- 
ing the circulation of the Conference organ in al- 
most every charge. Scores of people know noth- 
ing of the paper because they never see it; after 
they have read several numbers, it is not always a 
most difficult matter to create a desire in their 
minds to have it, if the desire is not already there. 
The Michigan "Christian Advocate" added seven- 
teen hundred new subscribers to its list in a single 
month. The secret was that nearly 400 Methodist 
pastors in Michigan observed "Advocate Day," and 
presented the claims of their Conference organ so 
intelligently, earnestly and persistently as to bring 
such magnificent results. What has been done in 
Michigan can be done in the Baltimore Conference. 
Are we willing to do it? 

The same can be done in the Western North 
Carolina Conference, and February was designated 
by our Conference resolution as Advocate month. 
Please send us list of names for sample copies. 



THE PASSING OF A USEFUL MISSIONARY 

Many readers of the Advocate will join in ex- 
pressions of deep regret at the announcement of 
the death of Rev. Geo. W. Greene, a missionary of 
the Baptist church, in China, for more than twenty 
years. 

Mr. Green was a native of Caldwell county and 
a graduate of Wake Forest College. For many 
years he was a pastor and teacher in his native 
section, spending several useful years as principal 
of the school at Moravian Falls, in Wilkes county. 
For some time he was professor of Latin at Wake 
Forest College. While he offered himself for work 
as a foreign missionary somewhat late in life, no 
man on the field did more faithful work. 

Mr. Green's whole life is an inspiration to those 
who had the good fortune to come in contact with 
him. Having to struggle with disadvantages in boy- 
hood he surmounted them all and at almost a ten- 
der age he came from college with high honors 
and entered upon his life work. From the begin- 
ning he was a faithful and zealous worker and it 
can truthfully be said of him that he served his 
generation faithfully by the will of God. 



THE WEBB BILL LIKELY TO PASS 

A special sent out from Washington under date 
January 14th, gives a gleam of hope that a bill 
prohibiting the. inter-state liquor traffic so far as 
it applies to prohibition states, may be favorably re- 
ported by the House Judiciary Committee. The 
special says: 

"A sub-committee of the House judiciary com- 
mittee is preparing to report to the full committee 
a bill "to prohibit interstate commerce in intoxi- 
cating liquors in certain cases," or "to divest whis- 
key of its interstate commerce character in certain 
cases." Several bills are being considered, one in- 
troduced by Representative Sheppard of Texas and 



another by Representative Webb of North Carolina 
are receiving more attention than any others. 

"The purpose of these bills is to protect prohibi- 
tion territory from liquor dealers as far as the law 
will go. 

The Anti-Saloon League Is behind the bills. Mr. 
Webb was appointed on a committee by the League 
to fiame a bill. His bill, which is now before the 
House judiciary committee, may be adopted. It 
goes as far as the constitution will permit, he 
thinks, and is a step in the right direction, the con- 
servative temperance people say. 

"The Webb bill provides that the shipment or 
transportation in any manner, or by any means 
whatsoever, of any spirituous, vinous, malted, fer- 
mented, or other intoxicating liquor of any kind, 
including beer, ale, wine, from one State, Territory 
or District of the United States, or place noncon- 
tiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof 
into any other State, or from any foreign country 
into any State, which said spirituous, vinous, 
malted, fermented, or other intoxicating liquor is 
intended, by any person interested therein, directly 
or indirectly, or in any manner connected with the 
transaction, to be received, possessed or kept, or in 
any manner used, either in the original package or 
otherwise, in violation of any law of such State, 
territory or district, is hereby prohibited, and any 
contracts pertaining to such transactions are declar- 
ed null and void, and no suit or action shall be 
maintained in any court of the United States upon 
any such contract or contracts, or for the enforce- 
ment or protection of any alleged right based upon 
or growing out of such contract or contracts or for 
the protection in any manner whatsoever of such 
prohibited transactions." 

"Bills to prevent or curtail the shipment of intoxi- 
cating liquors from State to State have caused much 
strife in Congress for years. Temperance people 
used to charge Speaker Cannon with packing the 
judiciary committee against such bills. Secretary 
Knox, then Senator from Pennsylvania, prepared a 
hill that he said was as far-reaching as the consti- 
tution would permit. This became a law. The fight 
is on again. Anti-Saloon Leagues are arrayed 
against liquor manufacturers. 

"The Webb bill is conservative and, he thinks, 
constitutional. The Sheppard bill is the Webb bill 
amended. 

"There shall be no property right in or to any 
such liquor while in the possession of any railroad 
company, express company or other common car- 
rier in connection with any shipment or transporta- 
tion thereof in violation of this act," is the Shep- 
pard amendment to the Webb bill. This amend- 
ment makes the bill drastic, and many able lawyers 
do not believe that it will pass the courts. It looks 
now as if the Webb bill would be accepted as a 
compromise measure." 



GREAT TEMPERANCE MEETING IN RALEIGH 

A great temperance meeting is to be held in Ral- 
eigh, under the auspices of the North Carolina Anti- 
Saloon League, January 26-28, and the indications 
are that it will be one of the most largely attended 
and representative temperance conventions yet held 
in the state. Among other subjects the convention 
will consider the success of prohibition in North 
Carolina, law enforcement and national legislation 
to stop the interstate shipment of liquor into pro- 
hibition territory. The convention is one to which 
there is an invitation to all in the State to attend, 
and it is earnestly desired that churches, temper- 
ance societies, and other organizations favoring the 
objects of the Anti-Saloon League be represented. 
No credentials are required and the invitation is a 
wide open one. Speakers of state and national 
reputation will have places on the program. 

Hon. Heriott Clarkson, of Charlotte, president of 
Anti-Saloon League, will open the convention Fri- 
day evening, the 26th inst., and an address of wel- 
come will be delivered by Governor Kitchin. Rev. 
Dr. P. A. Baker, of Westerville, Ohio, the founder 
of the Anti-Saloon League, will also speak at the 
opening session of the convention. The principal 
address Saturday morning will be by Hon. E. Y. 
Webb, of Shelby, member of Congress from North 
Carolina, who, as a member of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee, has been trying for ten years to secure the 
passage of an act to prevent the shipment of liquor 
into prohibition territory. On Saturday night the 
chief address will be by Congressman Richmond 
Pearson Hobson. On Sunday afternoon the main 
address will be by Hon. John G. Wooley, of Chi- 
cago, national lecturer of the Anti-Saloon League, 
one of the most eloquent speakers in the country, 



a candidate for president some years ago on the 
Prohibition ticket. 

The call for the convention says, in part: 

"It is the opinion of the Executive Committee of 
the Anti-Saloon League that the time has come 
when it is wise for the friends of prohibition and 
temperance to again assemble in convention at our 
State Capital and counsel together for the advance- 
ment of the cause that has proven such an un- 
bounded blessing to our State and to the welfare 
of humanity. 

"The liquor interests are watching night and 
day for any signs of laxity of interest or effort on 
the part of the friends of temperance anywhere in 
the whole country. Wherever they find or imagine 
such signs to exist, they at once concentrate their 
strength to recapture that section for the exploita- 
tion of their hellish business. The first great bat- 
tle for the cause of civic righteousness, the over- 
throw of the license system, has been won by a large 
majority in North Carolina and the voice of the 
people ought to be final. 

"Two objects now demand our attention. One 
is the growing evil of the interstate traffic. We are 
glad to see that the time is approaching when the 
national congress is likely to take cognizance of 
this evil, and it is desired that we, with men of like 
faith all over the nation, take counsel together on 
this subject. In December a great national confer- 
ence met at Washington, D. C, to consider this 
evil, the influence of which has been very whole- 
some. The other object is the better enforcement 
of our State laws, along with the teaching and 
preaching of personal abstinence." 



THREE WEEKS AFTER NEW YEAR S DAY 

We are sweeping along into the new year at 
such a rapid rate and the fascination of business, 
of politics, of boosting the city, of getting ahead 
in the world, of society, and of our various fads 
and fancies, is so absorbing that there is danger 
that even thus early in the year we shall forget 
those New Year resolutions. 

Were they worth while to make? Three things 
determine their value. The first of these is con- 
sideration. If they were the result of impulse, the 
cost of keeping them not counted, no wonder they 
are so lightly passed over. If they were merely 
a caprice, perhaps they were not worth making. 
"Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine 
heart be hasty to utter anything before God." 

This moral quality gives them their value. Were 
they of such a nature that they were made to God? 
If they were, and were made after deliberation, 
conscientiously, prayerfully, then are they of the 
highest value. They become a release from the 
bondage of the past, the golden gateway to a bet- 
ter life. 

In the third place they are worse than worthless 
if unkept. Their value lies in one's keeping them. 
"Better is it that thou shouldst not vow, than that 
thou shouldst vow and not pay." 

But if one is spiritually alive he must make new 
resolutions, for 

"New occasions teach me new duties, 
Time makes ancient good uncouth; 
They must upward still and onward 
Who would keep abreast of truth." 

The man who meets these new occasions unmov- 
ed, is dead while he lives. He is the unresponsive 
soil of the wayside. The wicked one cometh and 
"catcheth away that which was sown in the heart." 

The man who makes the New Year resolutions 
and fails to keep them is like him who "received 
the seed in stony places," hearing the word and 
receiving it with joy, but "by and by he is of- 
fended;" or he is like the man who "received the 
seed among the thorns," in whom "the cares of the 
world and the deceitfulness of riches choke the 
word, and he becometh unfruitful." 

Happy is the man who has the ability to make 
the New Year resolutions and the grace to perform 
them. He is like him who "received the seed into 
good ground, which also beareth fruit, and bringeth 
forth, some an hundred fold, some sixty, some 
thirty." 

"Who hath ears to hear, let him hear." * 



CHURCH UNION AND CHRISTIAN UNITY 

Rev. Dr. Henry Van Dyke made a plea for Chris- 
tian unity in a New Year's sermon he preached on 
the subject of "Christian Union the Basis of Church 
Unity," declaring that all Christians are really 
one already, whether they know it or not. "The 
movement which is called 'Men and Religion' has 



January IS, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



a name of promise," said Dr. Van Dyke. "The pro- 
posed conferences of churches for a frank statement 
of their differences are full of hope. It is bold, 
it is original, and if it is done in the right spirit — 
not with a desire to exalt them, but with a willing- 
ness to yield the non-essentials — it ought to open 
men's eyes to some of the absurdities of the pres- 
ent state of things. Church union rests upon the 
recognition of Christian unity. 

"There are thirty principal brands of Christians 
in the United States alone, not to mention innum- 
erable small fancy varieties. I believe that there 
is one denomination which is divided into two sects, 
one of whose visible points of separation is the use 
of hooks and eyes instead of buttons in the attach- 
ment of clothing. 

"Do you think it makes any difference what 
church a man is in when he comes face to face 
with one of the great crises of life, when tempta- 
tions meet him, when disasters overwhelm him, 
when his child or his wife are in mortal danger, 
when death looks him in the eyes? No; the one 
thing that counts then is the assurance of God's 
fatherhood and the trust in Christ, who has brought 
life and immortality to light." 



OBSERVATIONS 

It was Byron who said "all things are good when 
old." We treasure old friends, old times, old as- 
sociations, old memories, because they are a part 
of our life and of the life of every man. It is good 
to meditate upon the past for it helps to preserve 
memories which are sacred, it cultivates refining 
sentiment, mellows the heart and enriches the 
character, and a man is made better for the time 
spent in serious thought. It is a melancholy pleas- 
ure to linger for a while in an old grave yard, to 
read the epitaphs, to sit under the old cedar and 
listen to the murmuring wind while we recall sweet 
memories of those who sleep beneath the sod 
and then realize that we too must some 
time pay the debt and make our bed with them. It 
is in such hours that the problems of life are most 
seriously studied and the better way chosen for 
their solution. Most of our best thoughts are as- 
sociated with sadness; the childhood days that 
are gone forever; the old home ties which death 
has broken, the memory of a sainted mother, long 
since gone to her reward, the schoolmates of youth 
who have succeeded and failed, wno have wandered 
far away and died, the old church and the manifold 
memories, holy and sad, which it revives and of 
the many who worshipped there in the dim past 
but who now worship in the presence of the King. 
It is such thoughts as these which are holiest. They 
are saturated with the melancholy spirit, and im- 
press so deeply the truth that this old world is 
always changing and that we are traveling rapidly 
through it, looking for that city which hath an 
eternal foundation. This seems more and more to 
be the truth as the years creep upon us. It is not 
so to youth which always comes to a new world and 
looks with hope and expectancy for great things up- 
on the earth and by slow degrees, many times with 
great disappointment, fails to realize the dreams. 
This is best — eternal wisdom has so written it, 
and the Allwise Father in this way teaches us the 
profoundest lessons of wisdom. "The world passeth 
away and the lust thereof but he that doeth the 
will of God abideth forever." (I John 2:17.) 
* * * * 

The greatest truths that effect our humanity are 
the property of all men. We discover them after 
long experience and think they are new but they 
were known to Moses and Abraham, and to John 
and Paul in the ages gone and we are not apt to im- 
prove on them. We can study and learn by slow 
degrees as they did and profit by the lessons. 
There are many things which we now enjoy which 
are a great improvement on the past but the old- 
time way of making character is the way that Wis- 
dom has devised and God's way has been and ever 
will be the best. 

But we can improve in our church architecture 
and in our methods of work and should improve. 
The old brush arbor has long since served its day, 
the old log meeting house was the "holy of holies" 
to untold thousands who there were restored from 
death unto life, but we should not in these latter 
days, let unhealthy sentiment or stern covetousness 
allow us to be content to worship God in anything 
less than the very best that sacrifice and love can 
provide. Because our fathers in the wilderness 
could find nothing better than brush arbors and rude 
makeshifts in which to worship, is poor argument 
against handsome temples that will compare favor- 



ably with the buildings which the world constructs 
We should never be content to worship God in tents 
(I Chron. 17:1-2) while we live in comfort in ceiled 
houses. 

Because in earlier days the people sat on benches 
made of slabs and read the Bible, verse about, with- 
out comment and called it Sunday School, is the 
good argument that under better conditions we 
should have comfortable seats and the very best 
lesson helps that Christian scholarship can pro- 
vide. It is the tendency of some, however, to cling 
to the primitive ways — "to forget nothing and to 
learn nothing." 

The preacher used to "line out" the hymns for 
the good reason that many of the people could not 
read, and many of those who could, were either un- 
able or unwilling to buy hymn books, but in these 
days when books are cheap and education free it 
would hardly be necessary to "line out" the hymns. 

When the Southern Church was organized in 1844 
a church hymn book was soon provided and it met 
the needs of our people for over forty years, but the 
General Conference of 1886, for the reason that the 
old hymn book had became antiquated, provided for 
the publication of a new hymnal which contained a 
goodly number of modern songs. When this new 
book was introduced, there were many people sorely 
displeased. They had from their youth used the 
old book and saw no need for the new one. It took 
some years to displace the old hymnal and to fully 
establish the new. A younger generation has grown 
up since and it was brought up to sing the songs 
as found in the hymnal of 1886, and many are still 
attached to it through sentiment and otherwise. 
Ten years ago, Methodism, North and South, agreed 
to have a common hymnal and a common order of 
worship and committees from both sections labored 
long and diligently to that end and the present 
Hymn book and our present adjustable order of 
Church service are the result of the labors of that 
joint commission. 

As the brethern of 1886 protested against the new 
hymnal then introduced, so do we hear some breth- 
ern now praising the old book of 1886 and deploring 
the use of this last edition. I appreciate the senti- 
ment of the conservative who holds on to old things 
for I am built that way myself, but I am heartily in 
favor of the new common hymnal for the reasons: 

First: That the church has adopted it and it has 
come to stay so that all our protests are useless 
and in vain. 

Second: I want -to be loyal to the government 
of the church and to its laws and this new book is 
legally the Hymnal of the church. 

Third: In spite of our love for old things because 
they are old, this book contains really the finest 
collection of church music that has ever been pub- 
lished if we respect the judgment of competent 
musical critics. 

Fourth: It may be somewhat sentimental, but I 
like the idea of all American Methodism singing 
out of the same book and worshipping after the 
same order. I think it is the earnest of a better 
day and a more binding union of spirit if not of 
government. 

Every now and then some good brother rushes 
into print and protests against the new hymnal. Of 
course he has the right to do so but what good is 
accomplished by it? The church is not going to 
discard the book. It is here to stay and all the un- 
favorable comment can do no good and may do 
harm. Let us all accept it and learn some of the 
new music without forgetting any of the old. It 
would be well too for us to use it in all our services: 
prayer and Young People's meetings and Sunday 
schools as well as in the great congregations. If 
we would discard all other song books and teach 
the youth the great hymns of the cuurch they would 
better appreciate the magniflcant Hymnal and we 
would all get more of good out of the service of 
praise. 

» » * * 

Some weeks ago a very interesting article ap- 
peared giving the church affiliations of the Presi- 
dents from Washington to Taft. Those counted as 
Methodists were Grant, Hayes, McKinley, and John- 
son. The last named was a Methodist only in prin- 
ciple and not a member of the church, though his 
wife was a very devout Methodist. James K. Polk 
was classed as a Presbyterian but the article was 
not correct at that point. He was born near the 
corporate limits of the town of Pineville, where I 
now live, and from my window can be seen a pyra- 
mid of stone erected a few years ago by the pa- 
triotic Daughters of the American Revolution to 
mark the pla.ce where stood the house in which 



he was born. He was a Presbyterian by inheritance, 
for his mother was a devout member of that 
church as was also his wife. There were no Metho- 
dists in this section at the time of his birth. 

When but 11 years old he removed with his fath- 
er to Tennessee and in 1818 graduated from our 
State University in the class with Bishop Wm. M. 
Green, of Mississippi, Dr. R. H. Morrison, the first 
President of Davidson College, Wm. D. Moseley, 
later Governor of Florida and Hamilton C. Jones, 
(the first) who was an eminent lawyer in his day. 
He read law with Felix Grundy and soon became a 
leader at the bar and of his party in Tennessee, 
serving the State as governor and congressman, 
(was speaker of the House for five sessions) and 
then president. But I wanted to write of his church 
relations. In 1833 when he was in his prime he at- 
tended McPeak Camp Meeting near Columbia, 
Tenn., and heard John B. McFerrin preach, as only 
McFerrin could, a sermon of marvelous power from 
I Peter:3:5. That sermon went straight to the 
heart of the young lawyer and shaped the course 
of his after life and he was in heart a Methodist 
from that day. True he did not join the church 
and for the reason that his mother and his wife 
were communicants at another altar, but it was 
his intention some time to connect with the Meth- 
odist, though known only to his wife and a few 
friends. After his term as President expired in 
March, 1849, he returned to his home in Nashville, 
broken in health. He sent for Dr. McFerrin to visit 
him. Then in his sick chamber he was baptized 
and received into the Methodist church and on June 
15, 1849, he died in triumph. In old McKendree 
church the funeral sermon was preached by Dr. 
McFerrin and from the same text, (I Peter 1:3-5), 
he preached the same sermon which aroused the 
young lawyer at the Camp meeting in 1833. The 
reader will find it on page 223 of the life of Mc- 
Ferrin by the late Bishop Fitzgerald. 

* * * » 

It is worthy of mention that James K. Polk and 
Andrew Jackson were born within a few miles of 
each other, both near the South Carolina line 
though on the North Carolina side of the line. They 
were both men of iron mould; strong characters 
who would have made an impress in any age. Both 
were lawyers, both agreed in politics, both removed 
to Tennessee, both made their mark in Congress, 
both became president of the United States, both 
died shortly after retiring from the presidency, both 
joined the church after they retired from office; 
Jackson connecting with the Presbyterian and Polk 
with the Methodist. Polk was an aristocrat, Jack- 
son a plebian. Polk was well schooled, jackson 
was self educated. Polk was always a civilian, 
Jackson was first famous in the war of 1812. Polk 
led men by persuasion, Jackson compelled them if 
he could not persuade. But both were born rulers 
of men. Jackson was a man of iron will who court- 
ed opposition and conquered it. He seemed to be 
an absolute stranger to fear, yet brave as he was 
and feeling it to be his duty to join the church, put 
it off until he was out of politics for fear his ene- 
mies would charge that he did it for policy. It 
does seem that one so strong in physical courage 
would not have had such respect for the opinion 
of his critics. Sometimes a man's very strongest 
point seems to be his weakest. Peter, brave and 
swearing constancy, quailed in the presence of a 
Jewish maid, on that night when he denied his 
Lord. Who would have thought that of Peter? 

W. L. S. 



CONFERENCE BROTHERHOOD 

Assessment No. 4. The following have paid the 
assessment since my last report: E. A. Wiley, J. 
R. Scroggs, W. M. Boring, W. L. Sherrill, J. J. 
Eads, E. G. Pusey, J. C. Troy, C. H. Curtis, P. E. 
Parker, N. R. Richardson, W. S. Cherry, P. C. 
Battle, J. S. Hiatt, E. W. Fox, W. L. Dawson, W. 
V. Huneycutt, J. C. Keever, J. J. Edwards, S. Taylor, 
J. P. Davis, J. A. Bowles. Total who have paid 
this assessment to date, Jan. 13, — 48, leaving 78 
who have not yet paid, and only ten days until 
time is out. When you read this the time will be 
almost expired, therefore, send a check or money 
order at once. 

Assessment No. 5: The following have paid this 
assessment since last report: E. G. Pusey, G. D. 
Herman, J. A. Bowles, C. H. Curtis, W. S. Cherry, 
J. H. Weaver, W. L. Dawson, W. V. Huneycutt and 
S. Taylor. Total who have paid this assessment, 
11, C. M. Pickens, Sec.-Treas. 



FEBRUARY IS ADVOCATE MONTH 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



FORGETTING THE THINGS BEHIND 

C. S. Kirkpatrick 

Shall the faults of the past mar the future; 

No, the clouds all with silver are lined; 
Surely now we've at last learned the lesson: 

There's no changing the records behind. 

Has victory perched on our banners? 

Render praise to a providence kind; 
New enemies wait to be conquered — 

Pace the front and forget what's behind. 

Do affections once thought to be vanquished 

Arise to disquiet the mind? 
Calling back to the fleshpots of Egypt? 

Oh there's death and destruction behind! 

Let us gird for the oncoming conflicts 
With flesh and the demons combined; 

We can win in the might of the Master, 
Leaving folly and failure behind. 
Canton, N. C. 



MEETING OF BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF 
SOUTHERN ASSEMBLY 

The Board of Commissioners of the Southern As- 
sembly met at the Assembly offices on January 3rd 
and held five sessions, adjourning at noon on Fri- 
day, the 5th. There were present all the out-of- 
town members, General Julian S. Carr, of Durham, 
John R. Pepper, Esq., of Memphis; Dr. George R. 
Stuart, of Cleveland; and of the local members 
Bishop James Atkins, Dr. James Cannon, and 
Messrs. R. J. Sloan and S. C. Welch. 

The General Superintendent, Dr. Cannon, made 
a full report covering the work done during the year 
1911, and accompanied this report with recommen- 
dations for the work to be done between now 
and the time of the opening of the Assembly. The 
following are the principal items of interest to the 
general public: 

First. The first of July, 1913, was fixed upon as 
the date for the formal opening of the Assembly. 

Second. The Executive Committee of the Laymens 
Missionary Movement has fixed upon the summer 
of 1913, either in June or July, as the time for the 
third great conference of the Laymen's Missionary 
Movement, and has elected the Southern Assembly 
Grounds at Lake Junaluska as the place of meeting. 
It is expected that there will be over a thousand 
delegates in attendance upon this great conference, 
and thousands of visitors. 

Third. It was decided to erect a reinforced con- 
crete dam across the Richland Creek at the lower 
end of the property of the Southern Assembly, the 
lake level to be 2,550 feet above sea level, the area 
of the surface of the lake to be approximately 240 
acres, the lake to be spanned by a bridge about 600 
feet long, somewhat over a half a mile above the 
site of the dam, and a rustic bridge for foot pas- 
sengers to be built at the upper end of the lake 
at the point marked on the Assembly map as the 
Narrows. 

Fourth. The Superintendent was directed to se- 
cure suitable plans and specifications for the erec- 
tion of a one hundred room modern hotel, of an Au- 
ditorium to seat not less than four thousand per- 
sons, of a Public Service building, and of an As- 
sembly building, the latter to consist of a main 
building and offices and class rooms for the work 
of the summer schools, with two wings containing 
fifty bed rooms each, the same to be used as second- 
ary hotels. 

Fifth. It was definitely decided to adopt the deed 
and not the lease plan in the sale of lots. All per- 
sons purchasing lots will be given a deed for the 
same, such restrictions being contained in the deed 
as may be necessary to safeguard the purposes of 
the establishment of the Assembly. Sixty feet front 
was made the standard size for lots in certain por- 
tions of the grounds, and forty feet front in the rest 
of the grounds. The lot unit was fixed at twenty 
feet front, so that should any one desire to pur- 
chase more than sixty feet frontage it will be pos- 
hible to buy eighty, or one hundred, or one hun- 
dred and twenty feet. It is hoped that parties pur- 
chasing lots will not be satisfied with minimum 
size allowed, but will buy lots large enough to give 
ample space between the various cottages. 

The Board established a maximum and minimum 
price for lots. $1,200.00 was fixed for the maxi- 
mum price for a sixty foot lot, and $400.00 was fixed 
as the minimum price for a forty foot lot, making 
$20.00 a front foot for the best lots and $10.00 a 
front foot for the poorest lots, the price of the oth- 
er lots varying between $10.00 and $20.00 per front 



foot according to location. Any one who shall 
purchase a lot and erect a permanent residence 
on the same before September 1st, 1913, will re- 
ceive a rebate of fifty per cent on the purchase 
price of the lot, so that persons desiring to erect 
cottages before September, 1913, can secure the 
best lots on the grounds for $600.00 and can get a 
good lot for $200.00. 

A deduction of ten per cent will be made from 
the price of lots when cash is paid for the same. 
When cash Is not paid, the terms of sale of lots 
will be one-fourth cash, the balance payable in one, 
two and three years payable quarterly, if the pur- 
chaser so desires, the deferred payments bearing 
interest at 6 per cent per annum, the purchaser to 
be given a deed when the cash payment is made, 
the deferrd paymnts to be secured by a deed of 
trust. 

Sixth. The General Superintendent reported that 
the land purchased by the Assembly totalled 1100 
acres which had been bought at a cost of $92,000.00. 
The deeds for all of this land have been properly 
recorded, and all payments due up to January 1st 
have been promptly met. The Assembly has an 
option on approximately three hundred acres more 
of land adoining the property already bought. 

Seventh. The Commissioners devoted one even- 
ing to a consideration of the merits of the plans 
submitted by architects for the buildings to be 
erected on the grounds. Plans were submitted by 
Messrs. Jallade of New York, Hunt of Chattanooga, 
Neff & Thompson, of Norfolk, Gilchrist, of Pitts- 
burg, and Barber of Knoxville. The Commission- 
ers after discussing the matter, referred the ques- 
tion of the selection of an architect to the Execu- 
tive Committee with power to act.. 

Eighth. There are over four hundred preachers 
and laymen of the M. E. Church, South, from Vir- 
ginia to Oklahoma, associated together in the work 
of the Assembly. By the charter of the plan, the 
control of the Assembly is vested forever in the 
M. E. Church, South. The Assembly is in no sense 
a close corporation, but is a church-.wide movement, 
and the present stockholders at the annual meet- 
ing in August authorized the Board of Commis- 
sioners to place additional stock on exactly the 
same terms and conditions as that already placed, 
so that other Methodists who may desire to be as- 
sociated with the work of the Assembly can join 
in the work on exactly the same basis as those 
who are already in the company. 

The above is a condensed statement of the work 
of the Commissioners, which is of interest to the 
public at this time. Other questions such as wa- 
ter, sewerage, lighting, and transportation system 
were discussed, and final action deferred for more 
definite information. 

When the lake has been made it will be stocked 
with trout and bass and other fish suitable to 
mountain streams. A steamer and launches will 
be a favorite method of transportation to different 
parts of the grounds. The final survey of the 
property shows that the Shore Line Drive around 
the lake will be nearly eight miles in circuference. 
The highest point on the Assembly grounds is 2,- 
550 feet, or 1,000 feet above the surface of the lake. 
A survey is being made to locate a road to this 
highest point, and it is in the mind of the Super- 
intendent to build a log hotel to be known as Sun- 
set Lodge, with accommodations for fifty people 
who may want to go up from grounds to spend 
the night, where they can have a fine view of the 
sunset and of the sunrise. 

When the plans of the board of commissioners 
are carried out, the Southern Assembly will be the 
greatest community of summer homes to be found 
in the whole country. The General Superintendent 
visited fourteen of the Annual Conferences and 
several of the District Conferences of the M. E. 
Church, South, during the year 1911, and set forth 
the plans of the Assembly, and great interest was 
manifested in the work. 

James Cannon, 
General Superintendent. 



AN INFAMOUS DECREE 

The Roman Catholic church in attempting to en- 
force the "Ne Temere" decree of the Pope, is doing 
for the country precisely in nature, though perhaps 
not in degree, that which the Mormans seek to do 
in connection with their doctrine of a plurality of 
wives. In both cases it is an effort to make the 
ecclesiastical override the civil law, to undo or go 
against the civil law by setting over against it an 



ecclesiastical enactment. And in some respects the 
Romanists' effort is about as indecent as the Mor- 
mons'. The latter would have their plural wives 
if they dared. The former declare a certain class of 
marriages invalid, and divorced persons of that nu- 
merous class, and all other divorced people who are 
willing to say that they were living in indecent re- 
lations, at best nothing more than legalized concc- 
binage, may be married by the Holy Church, be- 
cause, having never been ecclesiastically married, 
a divorce means nothing and is as invalid as the 
original marriage. The recent instance in which 
Melbra figured is a practical illustration. In its 
last analysis the Romanists' attitude toward the 
matter is as indecent in kind If not degree as the 
Mormons'. And yet the Roman church is forever 
pluming itself upon its objection to divorces and its 
claim that it never marries divorced persons. Set- 
ting eside divorces, decrees of civil courts, in the 
same manner as it sets aside civil marriages, it 
finds it easy to marry divorcees. 

The welfare of the community depends upon 
properly prepared and carefully executed marriage 
laws and regulations. The interference with these, 
and the effort of any ecclesiastical body to set aside 
under pretense of religion is an impertinence of the 
grossest kind, amounting even to a veritable mis- 
demeanor. And the impertinence and interference 
with the law are the more marked as such by their 
emanation from a foreign source. An Italian, sit- 
ting in his chair of state in Rome, claiming to be 
a temporal prince deprived for a time of his rights 
and dominion alongside of other temporal princes, 
is trying and his representatives in this country 
are seeking to enforce his orders, to upset our civil 
laws on the most important and practical points 
which those laws cover. Lord Kiunaird, of England, 
calls upon all good citizens of his country to show 
their "determination to resist any interference by 
a foreign authority with the civil and religious 
liberty of the citizens of the British Empire.' Much 
more should the free people of America resist such 
an encroachment upon their laws by a foreigner 
who claims to be an earthly prince as well as an 
ecclesiastical ruler. 

To see the church of Rome's attitude toward this 
whole matter, and its contempt of our civil laws, 
one needs but to read the following: The Western 
Watchman, the Roman Catholic paper of St. Louis, 
after telling of how a young woman of its Church 
was married by a Baptist minister of New Jersey, 
and was required to "repair the scandal by writing 
a letter to be read in the parish Church," this let- 
ter to be signed by her maiden name, thus giving 
all to undersand that neither by the Church nor by 
herself was the marriage regarded as a valid and 
binding covenant," adds, "A preacher of the Bap- 
tist denomination took up the cudgels for his con- 
ference and the State of New Jersey and declared 
that the Archbishop of St. Louis had outraged the 
majesty and insulted the dignity of the Sovereign 
State of New Jersey, in refusing to recognize the 
marriage of a duly authorized minister, approved 
and recognized by the little state aforesaid. * * * 
We are told His Grace insulted the state of New 
Jersey; but what is the little state going to do about 
it? The Sovereign State of New Jersey can marry 
Baptists and their heretics; but it cannot marry 
Catholics. It could keep them out of political of- 
fice, and did so for many years; it cannot induct in- 
to wedlock. The Archbishop of St. Louis says so. 
All the priests and bishops of the world say so. 
Rome says so. What is the little State of New 
Jersey going to do about it? The State of New Jer- 
sey can license dogs; but it can have no hand or 
part or little finger in the marriage of Catholics. 
If that is an insult to the sovereign state of New 
Jersey we are sorry for the poor little thing; but 
what is it going to do about it?" 

Such is the spirit of the Roman Church. It does 
not often dare to express itself so openly and so 
plainly, but that is what it thinks and what it will 
try to do. Where is that Church's boasted loyalty 
to American citizenship and civil law? It has, in 
its rulers, and the hierarchy is the church, a com- 
plete contempt for the state and for all civil laws 
which its Italian Pope regards as in the way of his 
ecclesiastical enactments. — Presbyterian of the 
South. 



All moral refor goes in waves. Today the senti- 
ment recedes; tomorrow it will rise again. But 
year by year the flow becomes stronger than the 
ebb. 



January 18, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



THE DAWN OF THE NEW YEAR 

Pearl King Stevens 

In the dawning of the New Year as the Old Year 
steals away 

Many a heart is filled with yearning to blot out 

some bitter day, 
For In mem'ry still there lingers all its sorrow, 

sin or pain, 

And we feel we would do better could we live it 
o'er again. 

But the kind and loving Father knows the yearn- 
ing, contrite heart; 

Tho' the day is past recalling — yet the deed may 
have no part, — 

For this promise is to sinners and the aching heart 
shall know, 

"Tho' your sins may be as scarlei, I will make 
them white as snow." 

As we start upon the New Year let us leave the 
past behind, 

With new hope take up its duties, bearing this one 

thought in mind 
That experience serves to warn us, and devoutly 

should we pray 
That the Father ever guide us as we journey day 

by day. 

For He is our Rock and Fortress, He will succor 
us in need, 

He can stay the tempter's power e'er we're guilty 
of the deed; 

For before Him devils tremble — ev'ry kneee to Him 
must bend — 

He will give to us deliverance if we trust Him to 
the end. 

So then, leave the vain regretting, onward, bravely 
onward, go, 

Even knowing that the journey thro' the gloomy 

vale must go, 
Strive to reach the heights beyond it, where a 

glorious prospect lies — 
Shadows but enhance the grandeur as it gleams 

before our eyes. 

It is good to know we journey step by step, and 
day by day, 

And a hand Divine doth lead us, ever gently, all 
the way; 

So we'll trust all to the Father, nor be filled with 

doubt or fear, 
We will joyously go forward all thro' this in-coming 

year. 
Greenville, S. C. 



FROM THE COUNTRY OF THE SNOWS 

After a ride of four days and nights over moun- 
tains, hills, and fertile plains, we arrived soon after 
the last session of the Western North Carolina 
Conference, at Deer Lodge, Montana, and were com- 
fortably housed in a modern eight-room parsonage. 
Deer Lodge is located in the heart of the main 
range of the Rockies, almost in the shadow of Mt. 
Powell, and is the most beautiful little city in the 
entire domain of the great Treasure State. There 
is plenty of snow here and it is cold too. The mer- 
cury frequently drops to fifty and sixty below zero. 
The cold is tremendous. When it feels about like 
one of our November frosty mornings of the old 
North State, one has to don his heaviest to keep 
from frost-biting. 

No traces remain of the "wild and wooly west." 
It has long since passed away save in the fertile 
imagination of amateur story writers. Everything 
(even religion) is modern and up-to-date. This 
Northwest is a great country. Its very immensity 
staggers one. Its energy, its salubrity, and its vig- 
orous spirit of progress are contagious. No place 
for a lazy preacher, this. The people are big-heart- 
ed, whole-souled, generous, loyal. They are edu- 
cated, cultured, but not very religious. People from 
everywhere make up the population of the West. 
Every shade of religious belief is found here and 
most of them in some definite form. The whole 
West is flooded with literature on Christian Science 
and there is a great insidious, undefined undercur- 
rent of the belief running through the whole coun- 
try. Many of the churches here (not Methodist) 
give public dances. The public attend the dance 
but not the service. The greatest need of this peo- 
ple is the gospel. Not the easy, soft, soothing 
kind, but the pure old Jerusalem Gospel with the 



virile, authorative Methodistic ring to it. This they 
do not have adequately. Our northern brethren are 
not prosecuting a very vigorous campaign here, 
owing perhaps, to their extensive missionary work 
in the South. Our church has a great opportunity 
here and despite the prejudices and difficulties un- 
der -which it works, it is destined under wise 
evangelical leadership to play an important part 
in the development of this great country. 

Tom P. Jimison. 



, PROHIBITION 

Liquor dealers talk fluently of the harmlessness 
of beer as a beverage, and laud its beneficial ef- 
fects as a food, when the facts bear evidence that 
it is the most brutalizing of beverages and its vic- 
tims the most deliberate and cold blooded of all 
criminals. 

Note what it is doing for the "Fatherland" the 
place of its birth and culture. 

It has so impaired the morals of the army and 
so lowered the vital forces of her moral manhood, 
that it has caused alarm among her statesmen and 
incited actiye official warfare for the curtailment 
of its use. 

Though strangely insidious for a time, it is as 
strangely destructive in the end. It seduces but 
to- destroy. 

Our beer drinking Germans furnish ample proof 
of the exceeding hurtfulness of beer upon both body 
and mind. 

As a beverage the dealer is now making valiant 
fight for it, among our native Americans, and with 
results fearful to contemplate. 1 

Claimed to be harmless, many of our people, men 
and women, boys and girls are tempted by its harm- 
less, health-imparting" qualities to partake of it 
who do not indulge at all, in the stronger drinks 
sold at the licensed saloons. Hence it is, that more 
than the stronger drinks it is tending to make 
drinkers, and later drunkards of our sober sons and 
daughters. Hence we must, we must fight it as 
we do the stronger drinks. 

Is it not strange therefore, that liquor dealers, 
knowing this fact, and feeling the loss that prohi- 
bition in the South has brought upon their business, 
should make strenuous efforts to get by some mean? 
or other, however unfair, as much of their "harm- 
less, health-imparting" beer as possible into the 
reach of our people? 

There is a moral value in the prohibition of the 
government licensed liquor traffic, to everybody, 
but especially to every father and mother who have 
in charge a son or a daughter for whose future life 
they are responsible. 

There is a money value in prohibition to every 
man who has a business interest for the success of 
which he is responsible. 

The claim that the liquor traffic confers wealth 
or prosperity is too palpably absurd to be consider- 
ed by any observer. So far from it, the official 
figures stand to record as more than $12 expended 
directly for drink to $1 returned to the pockets of 
the people in revenue for the privilege of robbing 
them; and the direct cost of drink is less than the 
cost of the consequences which flow in multitudinous 
ways from the effects which follow drinking. 

"The temperance cause is the foundation of so- 
cial and political reform and this trust should be 
indelably stamped on the mind and conscience of 
every Christian voter if we would break the com- 
pact by which our government — for a pittance of 
revenue debauches and degrades her own citizen- 
ship." 

Every advance of Church and State is retarded 
until we break this covenant with death and de- 
struction. 

Do we realize and duly appreciate the difference 
between the criminals and the vagabonds reared 
by drink, and the honorable straight gentleman 
reared under prohibition, then what is our respon- 
sibility, and what does our sense of duty as Chris- 
tians holding the power of a free ballot, demand 
of us? 

Both observation and experience have taught us 
that we are never to have a government worthy the 
character of people we deem ourselves to be, 
until we enforce just treatment through just and 
equitable legislation which we need not hope for 
while our government holds co-partnership with an 
infernal — for it is infernal — liquor traffic. 

J. E. Ray. 

Asheville. N. C. 



AN APPEAL TO THE CHURCHES OF THE 
UNITED STATES IN BEHALF OF THE 
FAMILY 

By the Committee on the "Family Life" of the Fed- 
eral Council of the Churches of Christ in Am- 
erica. 

Dear Brethren: 

We rest our oppeal to you on the proposition that 
the Family and its development into the Home lie 
at the foundation of human welfare. Religion, Ed- 
ucation, Industry and Political Order must look to 
the Family for their material. Still more. For, as 
the great constructive and destructive forces in the 
field of biology have their final expression in the 
work of the cell, so it is in human society. The 
Home is the place where all that builds up or pulls 
down in the social order does its final work. Re- 
ligion, Science and general experience teach this. 

Two present tendencies have given shape to this 
appeal. One is the encouraging fact that there is 
an increasing conviction of the importance of these 
truths, together with much effort to protect and 
develop Family Life. The other is the prevelance 
of great domestic evils. Our institutions of learn- 
ing in their courses of study and our philanthropic 
societies in their practical work are giving in- 
creased attention to the tamily. Many are coming 
to see in the home the very crux of the social prob- 
lem. The report of the Census office on Marriage 
and Divorce, the disclosures of the Chicago Vice 
Commission and the complaints of experts in pub- 
lic education and religious training set forth the 
grounds for the latter statement. 

We, therefore, think it time for the churches to 
come to the front and do their full duty to the 
Family. We now, however, point to only three or 
four things that seem in most immediate need of 
attention and action. 

1. A Uniform Marriage Law has lately been pre- 
pared to follow the Uniform Divorce Law now in 
process of enactment by the States. We recom- 
mend these measures, though they may not be 
wholly ideal, to your attention. The clergy have 
widely called for some such provisions to meet the 
evils of discordant legislation, especially as a pro- 
tection against marriage and divorce. 

But we especially urge the need of a similar 
comity between the churches themselves so that 
persons who cannot be married by their own min- 
isters will not resort to those of other churches 
for the object. Do not consistency, the responsi- 
bilities for social leadership and the obligations of 
Christian fraternity demand this course from all 
our churches? Shall we not in this way observe 
that comity between churches that we are demand- 
ing of the states? 

2. The terrible evils of sexual vice are in urgent 
need of attention by the clergy, teachers and par- 
ents, in ways that are wise and efficient. We grate- 
fully recognize the growing interest in this subject 
and urge the leaders of the church to become in- 
telligent concerning it and co-operate in all practi- 
cal ways with the medical profession and with com- 
petent associations for dealing with it. 

4. Only one thing more at this time. Our church- 
es should lead their people to see that the Family 
has its true place in the activities of religion, edu- 
cation, industry and public order. As implied in 
what we said at the outset the vigor and safety of 
all other institutions depend on the extent to which 
they strengthen the life of the Family. Every ten- 
dency in any of these that weakens the Home 
should be resisted. Every plan for their own wel- 
fare should indicate a knowledge of its effect on the 
Home. Because of its importance and because of 
its relative neglect, the Home should receive more 
direct and positive attention. 

We commend these brief considerations of a 
great subject to the serious attention of the churches 
of our country, leaving the practical details of their 
application to be wrought out by them as their sev- 
eral systems of administration may suggest. 

We are, in the interest of our common faith, 
most cordially yours, 

In behalf of the committee, 

Wm. Croswell Doane, Chairman. 

Samuel W. Dike, i. 

E. B. Sanford, Secretary. 



In proportion a man gets back the spirt of manli- 
ness, which is self-sacrifice, affection, loyalty to 
an idea beyond himself, a God above himself, so 
far will he rise above circumstances and wield them 
at his will. — Kingsley. 



Page Six NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 18, 1912 



❖ * 

From the Field 

❖ » 

NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. Dr. H. K. Boyer, our Secretary of Mis- 
sions, has been putting in time on special work in 
the Statesville District. 

— The Charlotte Observer says that Rev. R. S. 
Howie, the new pastor of Calvary church, is being 
warmly welcomed by the people of that charge. 

— During the past year 10,396 people were killed 
and 150,159 injured on American railways. Of the 
number killed 356 were passengers, 3,602 were em- 
ployees and 6,438 were trespassers. 

— Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Raper, of Trinity, have 
our profoundest sympathy in the loss of their little 
baby girl, born January 3rd. May the Lord com- 
fort them in their great disappointment and sorrow. 

— Rev. W. A. Jenkins of the North Carolina Con- 
ference, and pastor of the Mt. Pleasant Circuit, 
died at his home at Bailey, N. C. on Tuesday, Dec- 
ember 19. He had just taken charge of the work. 

— Mr. Andrew Carnegie has promised $25,000 to 
Emory and Henry College on the condition that the 
trustees and friends of the college raise $75,000. 
The campaign to raise the $75,000 has already been 
inaugurated. 

— Rev. H. V. Clarke, pastor of the Wilkes Circuit, 
was a pleasant caller at the Advocate office on 
Thursday of last week. He was returning to his 
work after a visit of several days to relatives and 
friends in Rockingham county. 

■ — Rev. J. M. Lander, D. D„ and his family have lo- 
cated in Greenwood and will spend their time in 
the homeland in that city. Dr. Lander will attend, 
by special invitation, the meeting of medical mis- 
sionaries at Battle Creek, Jan. 25. — Southern Chris- 
tian Advocate. 

— It will be gratifying to his many friends through- 
out the church to know that Bishop A. W. Wilson 
is very much improved since his serious attack at 
Pensacola, Florida, and was able to take part in 
a family re-union at his home in Baltimore during 
the holidays. 

— Rev. J. E. Underwood moved his family to his 
new field last week. He and his family have many 
friends here who regretted very much that the 
Conference saw proper to tear them away from 
them before the four-year limit was out. — News 
Reporter. 

— We have a request from Rev. Richard J. Parker, 
of Havana, Cuba, to state that the book he mention- 
ed in his last letter, "Fighting the Traffic in Young 
Girls" can be obtained from George W. Noble, Lake- 
ville Building, Chicago, 111., instead of S. B. Shaw, 
as he erroneously stated. 

— Rev. P. L. Shore, pastor of Jackson Hill charge, 
was married to Miss Jean Phipps, of Baldwin, Ashe 
county, January 4th. The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. Geo. H. Everett, pastor of Jefferson Circuit. 
The Advocate joins in congratulations and wishes 
for the happy couple a long and useful career. 

— We have receieved an interesting pamphlet 
containing the speech of our good friend Mr. Jos. 
G. Brown, of Raleigh, delivered before the Ameri- 
can Bankers' Association at New Orleans, Novem- 
ber 22, 1911. Mr. Brown has had long experience 
in the banking business and can speak with au- 
thority on the subject. 

— A press correspondent, writing from High 
Point, says: Rev. B. Margeson, formerly of Mocks- 
ville, who has succeeded Rev. G. E. Eaves as pastor 
of the South Main Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church, preached his introductory sermons today, 
and his sermons drew quite large audiences both at 
the morning and night services. 

— A correspondent writing from Advance, Jan. 
10th, says: Rev. Plato Durham, presiding elder of 
the Winston District, made his first official visit 
to Advance Sunday and preached a very fine sermon 
at the Methodist church Sunday night. Mr. Dur- 
ham held the first quarterly conference Monday 
morning and made a most favorable impression on 
the official board. 

— The Twin-City Sentinel says: Miss Sattie Mar- 
ler has been chosen supervisor of the Methodist 
children's home here and will enter upon her duties 
at once. She is a native of Yadkinville and has had 
general and special experience which will fit her 
amply for her task, having been a teacher at the 
Oxford Orphan Asylum for several years and ren- 
dering signal service there. 



— Mrs. Margaret McAulay Ingram died at her 
home at Norwood on the 11th inst, following an 
extended illness. She was a highly cultured woman 
and a devoted member of the Methodist church. In 
addition to the bereaved husband, she is survived 
by two brothers, Messrs. J. A. and Frank McAulay, 
and one sister, Mrs. C. B. Ingram, the brothers and 
sister residing at Mt. Gilead. 

— Rev. W. T. Albright, pastor of Concord Circuit, 
preached at Central church last night in the ab- 
sence of the pastor, Rev. J. H. West, who had gone 
to Charlotte to see Judge Montgomery. Mr. Al- 
bright's sermon showed profound thought and study 
and was delivered in a most pleasing and effective 
manner. He made a most favorable impression 
with the congregation. — Concord Times, Jan. 8. 

— Major William H. Brooks, son of our former 
townsman, the late Dr. John R. Brooks, has been 
ordered to report to Brigadier General Daniel H. 
Brush, president of the army retiring board at San 
Francisco. It appares that Major Brooks, who is 
a surgeon in the regular army, recently failed on 
the officers' horseback riding test and he has there- 
fore been ordered to San Francisco for examina- 
tion. — Reidsville Review. 

— A mariage of interest to many Advocate read- 
ers took place at the home of the bride's parents 
in McDowell county on Thursday, December 28th, 
when Miss Mary Juanita Noblitt, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas W. Noblitt, was happily married 
to Mr. Rexford Morton Maugans, of Wolfsville, Md. 
IThe ceremony was performed by Rev. W. G. Mal- 
lonee. The bride is a sister of Rev. F. B. Noblitt, 
of the N. C. Conference. 

— A special from Waxhaw to Charlotte Observer, 
January 9th, says: "The first quarterly meeting 
for the year was held in the Methodist church here 
yesterday. Owing to sickness in his family, the 
presiding elder, Rev. J. R. Scroggs, of Charlotte, 
could not be present and Rev. C. F. Sherrill, the 
pastor, presided over the conference. A good fi- 
nancial report was made. The pastor has received 
twenty-two members into the church this year. The 
salary was enlarged, and the work of the year be- 
gins with good prospects." 

— Mr. Clark of the Statesville Landmark, while 
admitting that we have had weather severe enough 
calls Rev. J. W. Jones to the stand to help him 
prove that it has been colder. He says: "Rev. J. 
W. Jones of Mooresville, was in town Saturday and 
was talking about the cold and snowy winter of 
1880-81. Col. J. A. King contended that it was the 
winter of 1881-82, whereupon Mr. Jones came to The 
Landmark office and called for the record. The 
Landmark of January 7, 1881, says that on Wed- 
nesday and Thursday of the previous week — which 
was December 29-30, thermometers in Statesville 
registered as low as 11 degrees below zero; that at 
the Davis place the reading was 21 below, at Col. 
Allen's 12 below and at Mr. A. P. Murdoch's 19 
below, while at Wilkesboro it was twenty below. 
The Yadkin river was frozen over, ice in States- 
ville was five inches thick and the snow a foot and 
a half deep. So it will be seen that the winter is 
by no means yet up to former records, but what we 
have is enough. 



PILOT MOUNTAIN CIRCUIT 

We were sent by Conference to labor for the 
coming year on the Pilot Mountain Charge, and 
was cordially welcomed by the loyal people. I 
have met each congregation, and am well pleased 
with the kind people and trust much good may be 
accomplished during the year. On Friday even- 
ing, December 29th, we were kindly remembered 
by the people of Pilot Mountain by a very substan- 
tial pounding all of which is much appreciated. 
May we be able to prove worthy of their kindness. 

P. H. Brittain. 



WEBSTER CIRCUIT 

I have been reading the Advocate since Confer- 
ence with a great deal of interest, especially the 
letters from the brethren who have moved this 
year, and as we belong to the moving "brigade," for 
we have moved three times since Conference. We 
left Weaverville the morning of the 22nd of No- 
vember and it was very much like reaving home 
as we had served the Weaverville Circuit for five 
years, and of course had become attached to the 
people, and were rather loath to leave them. But 
we have found the people here kind and generous. 
The ladies of the village decided that the parson- 
age was too small so we moved out and the car- 
penters went to work, and in three weeks we were 



back in a nice seven-room parsonage instead of 
four rooms. The people of Webster don't believe 
in eating all the good things, but are willing to di- 
vide with their preacher; they have sent us many 
good things. We have seven preaching places; 
have made almost two rounds, the people receiv- 
ing us kindly at every point, for which we are 
grateful and pray that we may be able to do a 
faithful year's work and that much good may be 
accomplished. 

D. R. Proffitt. 



GREENSBORO FEMALE COLLEGE 

The regular Christmas holidays began December 
21 and work would have been resumed January 3, 
but owing to certain reasons, it was thought fit to 
extend the holidays to January 9. This will cause 
commencement to be a week later, or from May 25 
to May 28 inclusive. The students are all back and 
report enjoyable times during the holidays. Nearly 
all of the faculty spent the time in their respective 
homes. Mr. and Mrs. Kraft in Indiana, Miss Huffines 
and Miss Neff in Indiana, Miss Fisher in Kentucky, 
Miss Mitchell in Alabama, Miss Gray in Missouri. 
The remaining members of the faculty were at the 
college or with friends in different parts of the 
State. 

The mid-year examinations will begin Saturday, 
January 20, and close January 27. Recitation work 
will be resumed January 30, it being the opening 
of the second term. 

The contract for the new dormitory has been 
let and work is to begin just as soon as winter 
breaks. It is hoped that in early March the ground 
for the much-needed building will be broken. 
Enough money has already been paid in on sub- 
scription to start the work. 



BETHEL CHARGE 

We reached this charge November 23rd. We 
were met in Canton by Dr. J. E. Wilson and with 
him were soon viewing the beautiful Pigeon river 
valley on the road to Bethel. Just at the close of 
the day we reached the parsonage, six miles from 
Canton. A cheerful company of the ladies were 
awaiting us by warm fires and with supper pre- 
pared. We were introduced to such as Haywood 
tables present. Only those who have been in Hay- 
wood County know the full meaning of what we 
have said. We enjoyed this to the full extent. 
We are very grateful to Brother J. W. Moore for 
hauling out our belongings free of charge. On Tues- 
day night just fifty men, women and children met 
at the church and formed a line of march and led 
by Brothers J. W. Moore and W. S. Terrell, they 
marched direct to our pantry. Bro. Terrell is father 
of our Bro. J. M. Terrell, missionary to Brazil. We 
beard the tramp of the soldiers yet kept very still. 
Many good things were left with us. As we shook 
hands with the passing parade we noticed Bro. 
Burrell passing with a fine turkey in a sack with 
head peeping out for Thanksgiving. And indeed it 
is an occasion of thanksgiving to be thrown among 
a people of such abounding kindness. We have 
made the first round of the six churches and two 
extra appointments. Dec. 1st, we met the Board 
of Stewards in Canton. The pastor's salary was 
fixed at $400.00. 

Brother Cord ell met our first quarterly confer- 
ence at Spring Hill, Jan. 6, and he gave us three fine 
sermons, two at Spring Hill and one at Bethel. 
The stewards of this charge have a model pan of 
paying preacher's salary by the month with set- 
tlement each quarter. Three churches were not 
reported at the quarterly conference, but when 
these are heard from the salary will be nearly 
one-fourth paid. About Feb. 11th we will drop 
the Advocate a card stating the churches succeed- 
ing in the plan. This is a step forward which will 
greatly aid the pastors. We are pleased with the 
outlook for a good year. 

T. S. Coble. 



IF YOU NEED A TYPEWRITER? 

If any member of the Conference or preacher on 
trial should be interested in a typewriter, the best 
made, and at a very special price to preachers and 
sold on the most favorable terms, let him write 
to J. C. Troy, Durham, N. C, for the particulars, 
and they will be promptly furnished. It is the 
very best proposition, considering the value of the 
machine, that has been made and it is to preachers 
only. 



FEBRUARY IS ADVOCATE MONTH 



Januaiy 18, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



IMPORTANT ORGANIZATIONS AND PLANS 

Annual Conference Committee on Evangelism: 
Rev. L. T. Cordell, Chairman, Wlaynesville, N. C; 
Rev. J. E. Abernethy, Gastonia, and Rev. Jno. W. 
Moore, Sec.-Treas., Salisbury. 

District Leaders: Asheville — Dr. C. W. Byrd, 
Asheville; Charlotte — Rev. G. D. Herman, Wades- 
boro; Franklin — Rev. M. H. Tuttle, Franklin; 
Greensboro — Rev. J. H. Barnhardt, High Point; 
Morganton — Rev. H. H. Jordan, Morganton; Mount 
Airy— Rev. W. H. Willis, Mt. Airy; North Wilkes- 
boro — Rev. T. J. Houck, Sparta; Salisbury — Rev. J. 
P. Rodgers, Albemarle; Shelby — Rev. J. A. Bowles, 
Mount Holly; Statesville — Rev. C. M. Pickens, Le- 
noir; Waynesville — Rev. Z. E. Barnhardt, West 
Asheville; Winston — Rev. E. L. Bain, Winston. 
* * * * 

Dear Brother Blair: 

The purpose of the Conference on Evangelism is 
to carry out the recommendations of the report on 
evangelism which was so enthusiastically adopted 
by the Conference. As directed, the committee has 
appointed district leaders whose qualifications as- 
sure success to the enterprise this year. 

The first thing for all to do is to read carefully 
the report (Minutes pages 60 — 61) and then defin- 
itely determine, by God's grace, to realize its high- 
est import. In order to accomplish the largest re- 
sults, let us every one, both preachers and people, 
unite, endeavor, and believe for large things. Last 
year we recieved on profession of faith 5575 persons, 
an average of 23, while missionaries among the 
heathen averaged 42. A member of our Conference 
purposes, with the help of about twenty untrained 
• natives, to see 25,000 souls converted this year. 
How dare we 236 effective preachers, having the 
encouragement of hundreds of devout and active 
members, in over 800 churches in which at least 
five hundred services are held weekly, in a densely 
populated territory, purpose to do less than this 
lone leader! The Holy Spirit is stirring our hearts 
In this day over these high issues and shall we 
grieve Him by any reluctance to dare to do His full 
will in the edification of believers and the conver- 
sion of the world? Nay, God forbid, but we will 
arise, in His might and "thrust in the sickle." Who 
then is willing to consecrate his service to the Lord? 
If you are, may we offer some suggestions? 

I. As a pastor (or presiding elder) will you def- 
initely pledge your faithful efforts to lead at least 
one hundred souls to the Savior this year? Think, 
pray, decide and send me your name for registration 
quickly. Jesus said: "I am come to seek and to 
save that which was lost," and: "It i senough that 
the servant should be as his Lord." 

II. As a pastor, will you agree to secure written 
pledges from many oi your people to pray every day 
forthe accomplishment of your high purpose? — II 
Thess. 3:1; I Tim. 2:1; and Matt. 18:19. (Cards 
for this purpose will be supplied by each leader or 
secretary for 40 cents per hundred, postpaid. Can- 
not we secure immediately one hundred pledges 
from each pastoral charge? If so, 25,000 hearts will 
unitedly appeal to the Lord who will surely grant 
far more than we can ask. Our Zion shall be 
quickened throughout, multitudes of captives shall 
be liberated from sin-bondage and the whole Con- 
ference filled and thrilled with the glory of God. 
Let us bring it to pass! 

III. As a pastor, are you willing to co-operate 
in making every sermon, if possible, fruitful in im- 
mediate results, your Sunday school as a soul-sav- 
ing agency, and your prayer meetings glorious, spir- 
itual dynamos in the heart of your congregation? 
If so, "heaven is coming down, our souls to bless, 
and the slain of the Lord shall be many." May 
your measure be full this year! Psa. 126:5-6 

IV. As district leaders, brethren, it is our hope 
that you will put your brain and heatr into this sub- 
lime service. Will ycrti not: (1) endeavor to make 
your awn charge an effective example of soul-sav- 
ing power? (2) Encourage every pastor in your dis- 
trict to hold meetings and to concentrate his efforts 
in each department of his church and in every ser- 
vice upon some definite results? (3) Your assistance 
in distributing, collecting, and returning prayer 
pledge cards in all the charges of your district is 
coveted. Notify secretary of number wanted and 
he will supply them. (4) It is desired also that you 
either assist pastors in meetings in needy fields, 
or, when requested, to aid in securing such help 
and in every other way to advance genuine revival 
work throughout the Conference. Make your dis- 
trict lead splendidly. We appeal to all our mem- 
bers: (a) to co-operate heartily with the pastors 
in both regular and special services in the conver- 



sion of souls; (b) secure, sign, and return to your 
pastor, district leader or the writer, on record be- 
fore God and men as an intercession. Every one 
responding will be enrolled on permanent record, 
(c) "Let every one that nameth the name of Christ 
depart from inquiry" and let us form hereby a 
league that shall shatter the foundations of evil 
and rear in the spirits of thousands the Kingdom 
of God. It must be done! 

John W. Moore, Sec'y. 



FEBRUARY IS ADVOCATE MONTH. 



LOWELL AND DALLAS 



At the last session of our Conference Bishop 
Hoss changed the name of this charge from Ozark 
and Lowell to Lowell and Dallas, as Ozark church 
was taken off and Dallas put on instead. So that 
we now have Bethesda, Lowell and Dallas. I ex- 
pect to preach once a month at Spencer Mountain 
Cotton Mills. 

As I did not have to move I entered upon my 
work at once, not missing any Sunday. Since Con- 
ference we have had many expressions of appre- 
ciation, both by word and deed. Three or four of 
the elect ladies of Bethesda gladdened the hearts 
of preacher and family by sending some things 
for the table. Then on Saturday before Christmas 
some of the young people of Lowell surprised us 
with a pounding. Remembering that a pounding 
was not complete without a chicken, some of them 
came a second time to complete the job. To say 
we appreciated this very much is putting it too 
mildly. 

My first appointment at Dallas was the fourth 
Sunday in November. And while we were loath to 
give up that noble class of loyal Christian workers 
at Ozark, we found a noble band of intellgient, big- 
hearted people at Dallas that stand by and uphold 
the preacher's hands like Aaron and Hurr. This 
charge has only 222 members. The outlook is 
fair for a good year. 

We are planning, praying and looking for good 
revivals. We must have them for it is the founda- 
tion of all our work. Pray for us, brethren. 

I am about ready to enter the campaign for the 
Advocate. 

Success to the Advocate and its readers. 

E. N. Crowder. 

Lowell, N. C. 



SHELBY DISTRICT 



The Distr'ct Stewards of Shelby District met 
in Shelby, Central Church, Tuesday of this week 
estimated the presiding elder's salary the same as 
last year, and apportioned rsepectively this amount 
and the Conference Collections among the charges 
of the District on the basis of pastors' salaries. 
Encouraging report was made by Presiding Elder 
regarding new District parsonage, and plan adopted 
to make additional payments on same, during en- 
suing year. The larger proportion of District 
Stewards were present, besides a number of pas- 
tors and lay-leaders of the District. In the joint 
conference of pastors and laymen, following the 
District Stewards' meeting, resolution was adopted, 
recommending the pastors of Shelby District, on 
second Sunday in February, present the casue of 
temperance, and take collection, forwarding same 
to Mr. J. A. Odell, Greensboro, N. C, Treasurer 
Joint Board of Finance. Out of said funds, the 
expenses of delegate from this district to National 
Anti-Saloon League Convention, are to be paid, the 
remaining amount to be used by State Anti-Saloon 
League. Resolutions were also adopted pledging 
co-operation with National and State Anti-Saloon 
Leaguers, and other temperance force, in earnest, 
prompt endeavor to secure national legislation in 
prohibiting interstate shipment of liquors into pro- 
hibition territory. At the evening session an ex- 
cellent conference was held, touching the practical 
interests of the district, Sunday schools, evangel- 
ism and finances. — Cleveland Star, Jan. 12. 



Every one of us can do something for humanity — 
rich, poor, young, old. When God made this world 
he did it without cny of us. You did not dig a 
trench in the Atlantic or put any stones into the 
Alps. The rainbow owes nothing to your paint pot. 
God did it all. But this time he is building a new 
humanity, grander than any sun or star, and he per- 
mits you to be coworkers with himself. "And thou 
mayest add thereto." Put in your contribution, put 
it in. — W. L. Watkinson. 



A CALL FOR INFORMATION 

To the Pastors: 

We are mailing each of you this week, a letter 
asking for information wanted by your Board of 
Education. If we can get the information asked, 
we hope to be able to do a work for our schools 
that we know to be absolutely necessar.y. So we 
have the right to expect as servants of the confer- 
ence, that every charge will give us this needed 
list. 

G. T. Rowe, 
A. E. Cole, 
W. R. Odell, 
F. M. Weaver, 
P. T. Durham, 
Executive Committee. 
L. B. Abernethy, Secretary. 



TO OUR CHURCH FRIENDS 

If you receive a sample copy of the Advocate 
this is an invitation to subscribe. We are sending 
out many samples, and we trust many will decide 
to send in their subscriptions at once. Send money 
direct" to us or hand to your pastor. 



OUR ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

Report of new subscribers and renewals sent in 
by pastors to date, January 9th. 

Charlotte ^strict Ren £ew 

Rev. G. D. Herman 1 1 

Rev. W. L. Sherrill 5 

Total — 6 — 1 

Fr»nklin D^stri t 

Rev. J. F. Starnes 4 

Total — 4 

Greensboro District 

Rev. S. T. Barber 1 

Rev. J. T. Stover 4 

Rev. A. L. Aycock 1 

Rev. W. F. Womble 1 1 

Spring Garden 1 

Total — 6 — 3 

Morganton District 

Rev. D. S. Richardson 1 

Rev. R. E. Hunt 1 

Total — 1 — 1 

Mount Ai>-v District 

Rev. Z. V. Johnson 2 

Rev. J. M. Folger 1 

Total — 1 — 2 

North Wilkesboro District 

Rev. J. E. McSwain 1 

Total — 1 

Salisbury District 

Rev. J. W. Clegg 1 

Rev. W. T. Albright 1 

Rev. G. G. Harley 1 

lev. J. P. Rodgers 1 

Rev. G. A. Stamper 1 

Rev. R. L. Forbis 1 

Total — 4 — 2 

Shelby Dist-ict 

Rev. J. H. Robertson 1 

Rev. T. J. Rogers 1 

Total — 1 — 1 

Statesvi'le District 

Rev E. Myers 1 

Rev. J. P. Davis 1 

Rev. T. E. Wagg 1 

Rev. C. M. Pickens 1 

Rev. J. W. Kennedy 1 

Rev. E. E. Yates 1 

Rev. J. J. Eads 1 

Total — 4 — 3 

Wavnes' i'le District 

Rev. J. H. Green 2 

Rev. T. S. Coble 1 

Total .—2 — 1 

Winston District 

Rev. L. T. Hendren 1 

Rev. J. T. Ratledge 2 3 

Rev. F. L. Townsend 1 

Total — 3 — 4 

Grand total —28 —23 



Cheered by the presence of God, I will do at 
each moment, without anxiety, according to the 
strength which He shall give me, the work that His 
providence assigns me. I will leave the rest with- 
out concern; it is not my affair. — Fenelon. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



Foreign Mission Department 



Mrs. D. M. Litaker, Pre«s Superintendent, Hickory, N. C. 



THE COMING OF THE GREAT 
GUEST 

While the cobbler mused there passed 
his pane 

A beggar drenched by the driving rain. 
He called him in from the stormy 
street, 

And gave him shoes for his bruised 
feet. 

The beggar went on. There came a 
crone, 

Her face with wrinkles of sorrow 
sown; 

A bundle of faggots bowed her back, 
And she was spent withthe wrench and 
rack. 

He gave her his loaf and steadied her 
load, 

. And she took her way on the weary 
road. 

Then to his door came a little child, 
Lost and afraid in the world so wild — 
In the big dark world. Catching it up, 
He gave it milk in the waiting cup, 
And led it home to its mother's arms, 
Out of reach of the world's alarms. 

The day went down in the crimson 
■west, 

And with it the hope of the blessed 
Guest, 

And Conrad sighed as the world turn- 
ed gray: 

"Why is it Lord, that your feet delay? 
Did you forget that this was the day?" 
Then soft in silence a voice he heard: 

"Lift up your heart, for I kept my 
word. 

Three times I came to your friendly 
door; 

Three times my shadow was on your 
floor: 

I was the beggar with bruised feet; 
I was the woman you gave to eat; 
I -was the child on the homeless 
street." 

—Edwin Markham. 



FROM TRYON ST., CHARLOTTE. 

The Home and Foreign Missionary 
Societies of Tryon St. Methodist 
Church met in joint session, January 
1, 1912 at 3:30 o'clock for the purpose 
of uniting and electing officers for the 
ensuing year. The following were the 
officers chosen: 

President — Mrs. W. W. Hagood. 
1st Vice-President— Mrs. H. D. Shel- 
ton. 

2nd "Vice-President — Mrs. E. A. Cole. 
3rd Vice-President — Mrs. B. D. Heath 
4th Vice-President — Mrs. Sam As- 
bury. 

Rec. Sec. — Mrs. Arthur Hearn. 

Cor. Sec. for Home Department — 
Mrs. H. B. Pickens. 

Cor. Sec. for Foreign Department — 
Mrs. E. J. Matthews. 

Treas. for Home Department — Mrs. 
J. M. Jones. 

Treas. for Foreign Department — Mrs. 
C. C. Kennedy. 

Agent for the Missionary Voice — 
Mrs. H. B. Pratt. 

Supt. of local Press Work — Miss El- 
la Dowd. 

Mrs. E. J. Matthews, 
Mrs. E. J. Matthews, Cor. Sec. 



Miss Belle H. Bennett, the presi- 
dent of our Woman's Missionary 
Council, writes a strong article in the 
current number of the Methodist Re- 
view upon the History of the World- 
wide Movement for the Liberation of 
Woman." She presents this move- 
ment as it has" existed in the leading 
nations of the world under the follow- 
ing sub-titles: Educational; Legal 
Protection of Property and Personal 
Rights; Woman in Industry; Political 
Rights; Woman in the Church; The 
New Woman. 

This historical review of the situa- 
tion of woman in the various respects 
enumerated, is so strong and convinc- 
ing an appeal that even a conserva- 
tive finds it hard to resist conversion 
to Miss Bennett's views. Her facts 
and arguments are simply unanswer- 
able. Dr. Gross Alexander, the editor 
of the Review, in commenting on the 
article says in part: 

"The history of the work and the 
achievements of women in recent 
years in all forms of Christian activity 
and social reform is a veritable reve- 
lation — a matter of special wonder. 
It is the opening of a new chapter both 
in the providence of God and in the 
history of man. It is the advent of a 
new force in the terrific struggle of 
the kingdom of God against the 
kingdom and powers of darkness. 
It marks, no, it makes, an epoch in 
the history of humanity. We wonder 
why it did not come sooner. We can 
but marvel that God permitted it to 
delay so long. But it has come, and 
by every test and token God has come 
with it; or rather let us say that God 
has come in it — it is another coming 
of God into the world." 



HICKORY SOCIETIES UNITE 

At the December meeting of the 
Home and Foreign Missionary Socie- 
ties of the Hickory Methodist church 
a harmonious union was effected and 
there now exists one strong society. 
The meetings are held twice a month 
on the first and third Tuesdays. The 
following officers were elected for the 
year: 

President — Mrs. J. W. Shuford. 
1st Vice-President — Mrs. R. J. Fos- 
ter. 

2nd Vice-President — Mrs. L. F. Mill- 
er. 

3rd Vice-President— Mrs. S. P. Bis- 
aner. 

4th Vice-President— Mrs. H. F. El- 
liott. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Law- 
rence Fry. 

Corresponding Secretary of Foreign 
Department — Mrs. J. T. Johnson. 

Corresponding Secretary of Home 
Department — Mrs. J. W. Clay. 

Treasurer of Foreign Department 
—Mrs. H. F. Elliott. 

Treasurer of Home Department — 
Mrs. G. F. Ivey. 

Treasurer of Local Work — Mrs. J. 
A. Bowles. 

Agent for the Missionary Voice — 
Mrs. B. F. Seagle. 



MISSIONARY "JUBILEE" AT 
MUIRS CHAPEL 

Soon after the Golden Jubilee in 
Greensboro we planned for a Jubilee 
meeting Dec. 26, inviting the Friends 
of Guilford College to join with us. 

We had some of our best Methodists 
and Friends to address us on various 
subjects of the missionary work. But 
the day was so very rainy we had a 
small audience. Sorry we did not 
have a full church at this special time, 
for every subject was uplifting and 
inspiring. 

Muir's Chapel Auxiliary pledged 
$20.05 for the Rio School. 

The pledge of $75.00 to help sup- 
port a missionary has been paid in 
full. 

We feel that our young society is 
doing very well, but we must give 
credit to our live president, Mrs. W. 
L. Dawson. We hope to grow in 
strength and usefulness. 

Mrs. Cecil A. Boren. 



FROM THE STATESVILLE AUXIL- 
IARY 

Dear Mrs. Litaker: 

I want you to know something of 
the Statesvllle Auxiliary. We have 
thirty-eight members with an average 
attendance of nineteen. Twenty-three 
of our members are subscribers to 
Missionary Voice. We enjoy it very 
much. We observed Week of Prayer. 
The program was carried out. Meet- 
ings were all well attended, were very 
interesting and instructive. Our col- 
lection for the week was $14.00. 

Our pledge of $100.00 was paid in 
full, an increase over the preceding 
year. 

We had as our president last year 
Mrs. E. L. Bain, who according to the 
laws of our Conference, has been mov- 
ed to another field of activity, and in 
her removal we feel we have sustain- 
ed a great loss. 

Our officers for this year were elect- 
ed as follows: 

President — Mrs. H. K. Boyer. 

1st Vice-President — Mrs. J. F. An- 
derson. 

2nd Vice-President — Mrs. A. J. Lal- 
ley. 

3rd Vice-President — Mrs. R. K. Mur- 
dock. 

4th Vice-President— Mrs. E. G. Gil- 
mer. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Jessie 
Brown. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. J. L. 
Sloan. 

Treasurer — Mrs. R. K. Murdock. 

Press Reporter — Mrs. J. L. Sloan. 

Our president received much en- 
thusiasm at the Jubilee Meeting in 
Charlotte and we feel that this en- 
thusiasm added to her already unself- 
ish devotion will prove a benediction 
to our society. We have organized 
a study club of ten members to meet 
every Monday afternoon at the homes 
of the members. We will study West- 
ern Women in Eastern Lands. 

We are getting up a box this week 
to send to our children at Winston. 

Best wishes for you in your good 
work this year. 

Mrs. J. L. Sloan, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



OUR WORK IN CHINA 

Bishop Murrah, who is at present 
in China superintending our missions, 
has the following good words to say 
of the women's work there: 

"In my observations over here noth- 
ing has impressed me more favorablv 
than the work of our women. Their 
institutions are admirably located, 
and they are administered in a way 
to excite pride and admiration in an 
uncommon degree. Mrs. Murrah and 
I are at this time guests in the Mc- 
Tyeire Institute; and as I have the 
opportunity to observe daily the con- 
duct of its affairs, I cannot very well 
refrain from commending most cor- 
dially the splendid work of Miss Clai- 
borne and her accomplished assis- 
tants." 



THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA 

The new government in China is 
assuming a strong position, and the 
leaders in the revolutionary move- 
ment believe that the people of China 
are almost unanimously in their favor. 
Dr. Sun Yat Sen, the first president of 
the Republic of China, has named a 
Cabinet which is generally regarded 
as a strong one, and the terms he of- 
fers the Manchus aie more generous 
than was at first believed to be the 
case. That the old order in China has 
passed is certain. Whether the pres- 
ent Republican government will stand 
is yet uncertain, but the chances for 
its continuance appear now most fav- 
orable. — Nashville Advocate. 



NOTES OF INTEREST 

The Methodist Churches of Toronto, 
Canada, with a total membership of 
22,946, paid for missions during the 
Conference year 1910-11 $130,116.33, 
or an average of $5.67 per member. 
Sherbourne Street Church, with 1,029 
members, paid $20,132.52, an average 
of $19.56 per member. 

The Woman's Missionary Society of 
the Canadian Methodist Church had 
during the past year an income of 
$136,000 as compared with an income 
of $50,000 ten years ago. The number 
of missionaries in the field has in- 
creased during ten years from thirty- 
nine to more than seventy. — Nashville 
Advocate. 



Christ's challenge to the church is: 
"If you love Me, prove it." 



WHY THE KINGS BUSINESS RE- 
QUIRES HASTE 

We have grown somewhat ac- 
customed to the statement that nearly 
every non-Christian land today is in 
a state of crisis touching religious 
matters. Indeed it may be that we 
have occasionally grown a little weary 
of the constant reiteration of this 
thought. And yet more than likely 
we have never quite realized it with 
the emphasis that we should, or under- 
stood as fully as we might why it 
was so. The Right Honorable James 
Bryce, British Ambassador at Wash- 
ington, writing in the first number of 
the new International Review of Mis- 
sions, will help us both to appreciate 
the fact and understand more fully the 
reason of it. In an article of unusual 
interest and strength he put the mat- 
ter in this way, and knowing him as 
we do we must admit that he speaks 
with authority: 

"The age in which we are now liv- 
ing is a critical time. It is, perhaps, 
the most critical moment there has 
ever been in the history of the non- 
Christian nations, a moment most sig- 
nificant in its bearing upon their fu- 
ture. . . . Our material civiliza- 
tion is permeating every part of the 
earth, and telling, as it never told be- 
fore, upon every one of the non-Chris- 
tian people. In another fifty years 
that which we call our civilization 
will have overspread the earth and 
extinguished the native customs and 
nreanizations of the savage and semi- 
civilized peoples. They are being ex- 
ploited as they never were before, and 
the means of transportation by land 
md sea which have penetrated among 
them have brought foreigners every- 
where, and are completely breaking 
up and destroying not only the mater- 
; al conditions of their life, but also 
their ideas and beliefs and worships, 
their ancient customs and all that is 
associated with these customs and be- 
liefs. Their morality, such as it was, 
with all its tolerance of vices and all 
its degrading practices, was neverthe- 
less, for some purposes, a sanction 
which did restrain them and which 
elevated their notions and directed 
their actions for some good purposes. 
All of this is crumbling away and dis- 
appearing, perishing under the shock 
and impact of the stronger civilization 
which the European peoples have 
brought with them. Unless the back- 
ward races receive some new moral 
basis of life, some beliefs and precepts 
by which they can live, something to 
control their bad impulses and help 
them to form worthy conceptions of 
life and work, their last state will be 
worse lhan tiie first." 

Surely now is the accepted time in 
mission work, and a little later will 
only make the task harder and more 
taxing, as well as more hopeless. — 
Christian Guardian. 



Nashville has succeeded in raising 
$150,000 for the Galloway Memorial 
Hospital. This with the fifty thousand 
already secured makes it possible to 
go ahead with the erection of the first 
building. — Exchange. 



JOIN THE ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB 



SEE ANNOUNCEMENT 
ON BACK COVER 



January 18, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Pag* Nine 



Home Mission Department 

Conducted by Mrs. W. L. Nicholson 



SOME SEARCHING QUESTIONS 

Three hundred and sixty-five days 
have passed since last January. On 
how many of these days have you 
remembered to pray for Christ's king- 
dom? 

Did you ask the Lord during the 
year what special work He had for 
you to do? 

What have you done this past year 
to make yourself more fit for His 
service? 

What are you going to do this com- 
ing year in the line of working, giv- 
ing, and praying? 



COURTESY 

Some people regard answering let- 
ters as a matter of minor importance, 
but we feel that it is a courtesy due 
each other. Letters of inquiry or of 
a business nature require prompt at- 
tention, and answers to friendly let- 
ters should not long be delayed. Cour- 
tesy is a Christian virtue: I Peter, 
8:8. 



mrs. Luke johnson 

The many friends of Mrs. Johnson 
will be glad to learn that she is gain- 
ing strength, and hopes soon to get 
hold of the ropes again. We have 
missed her very much during her ill- 
ness and shall rejoice to have her well 
and at her desk. No other officer has 
more friends in South Carolina than 
she and a welcome always awaits her 
coming. 



THE COUNCIL MEETING 

April 12 has been decided upon as 
the date of the council meeting in 
Washington, D. C. No further an- 
nouncements have been given as yet, 
but let us even now begin to pray for 
a gracious meeting and that the re- 
sults will be such as God designs and 
approves. 



REPORTS AND LIST OF OFFICERS 

Our Conference Secretary, Mrs. Jas. 
Atkins, is very anxious that our year- 
ly report be accurate and asks that 
those auxiliaries which have not re- 
ported to their District Secretaries 
please do so at once. And she also 
wishes that every auxiliary will please 
send her at once, a list of newly elect- 
ed officers. The Conference officers 
are waiting on her for correct direc- 
tories for their departments, and the 
General office at Asheville also needs 
a corected directory of all auxiliary 
officers in our Conference. Please, 
sisters, do not fail to help your sec- 
retary in this way, for she is depend- 
ing on you, and many are depending 
on her. Where no new list is sent, 
the literature will continue to go to 
former addresses. 



THE IMPORTANCE OF THE EARLY 
YEARS IN TRAINING CHIL- 
DREN 

"The kingdom of God will come on 
earth mainly through the gateway 
of childhood; this is the truth to which 
society is slowly opening its eyes." 

The Southern Methodist church is 
taking no small part in hastening the 
coming of the kingdom. The chil- 
dren's work has been given a prom- 
inent part because we have come to 
realize that childhood holds the key 
to the salvation of the world. Save 
our generation of children, train them 
to missionary thought and work, and 
and you simplify and reduce the prob- 
lem that confronts us today. 

There should be in every church 
where fifty or more children are 
available a baby division, holding one 
meeting a year, inviting parents and 
friends. 

Children from six to nine require 
training in the form of story telling, 



etc., while for those from nine to 
fourteen study can be taken up and 
programs carried out, as outlined 
in Young Christian Worker. 

Modern psychology is making clear 
that after adolescence is passed little 
can be done to change radical moral 
tendency in human character. It is 
our ambition to give every child in 
Southern Methodism an opportunity 
to learn of the conditions and needs 
of unfortunate children by belonging 
to an organization that teaches these 
facts. At the same time they will be 
taught to look to Christ as our pat- 
tern and to feel that there is a mis- 
sion for the tiniest one in His king- 
dom. 



(The following paper prepared by 
Mrs. W. B. Pickens, of Tryon St. Aux- 
iliary was read at the District Mis- 
sionary Meeting held in Monroe in 
October. We are glad to publish it 
here. — Editor.) 



THE MODEL CORRESPONDING 
SECRETARY 

If one is to become a model corres- 
ponding secretary, she should first 
realize the importance of her office 
and her individual accountability to 
keep the charge committed to her, 
ever remembering she serves the Lord 
Christ. When she can repeat Psalms 
CXIX 33 with a prayerful heart, 
"Teach me O Lord, the way of thy 
statutes, and I shall keep it unto the 
end," she is in a fair way to become 
a model Corresponding Secretary. The 
Corresponding Secretary is often de- 
preciated (even by herself) because 
she does not represent the moneyed 
interest of the society. The Treasurer 
is sending out that which is the very 
life blood of the wont at large. The 
model Corresponding Secretary is 
gathering information, the source, the 
foundation of interest, and as workers 
we must be intelligent ones. 

The law says the Corresponding 
Cecretary shall conduct the corres- 
pondence of the society. The Model 
Corresponding Sesretary not only ac- 
knowledges, or answers all communi- 
cations received, but does not forget 
to report to the Auxiliary the inform- 
ation she receives. 

There are many ways she can mag- 
nify her office by exerting her person- 
al influence, by increasing the percent- 
age of monthly attendance and the 
monthly effort and prayer in behalf 
of the work. 

The model Corresponding Secretary 
attends each monthly meeting with 
her record book and calls over each 
item. Some of the items are as fol- 
lows. 

No. papers and leaflets distributed. 
No. visits made to sick and strang- 
ers. 

No. garments distributed. 

No. visits made to corrective and 
benevolent institutions. 

No. cottage prayer meetings and 
Bible readings held. 

Each month she gathers material 
for the three months report. At the 
close of the quarter, she will not need 
to be running here and there to get re- 
ports, but will have them in her record 
book. 

The model Corresponding Secretary 
sends in her quarterly reports prompt- 
ly to the District Secretary. Too 
much stress cannot be made here of 
this necessary duty. If the Corres- 
ponding Secretary of the weakest 
auxiliary fails to send her report at 
the appointed time (which should be 
the first of the quarterly month, not 
later than the 5th) her failure renders 
imperfect the report of the Conference 
Corresponding Secretary which in turn 
mars the quarterly report of the Cor- 
responding Secretary of the Woman's 
Missionary Council. It is like the 
endless chain which we must not break. 



Let us give time to the study of the 
Almanac to realize when the months 
of March, June, September, and De- 
cember roll around in their quarterly 
circuits. 

Let each Corresponding Secretary 
become a model Corresponding Secre- 
tary and make the District Secretary's 
heart glad, and lighten her work. The 
District Secretary has not an easy 
place, but if the Corresponding Secre- 
tary would co-operate with her, her 
task in getting reports would not be 
so hard. 

The Model Corresponding Secretary 
should report all boxes sent from the 
Auxiliary to the superintendent of 
supplies. 

Mrs. Woltz of Rockford, N. C, Supt. 
of Supplies, laid such stress on that 
part of the work at the annual Con- 
ference at Waynesviile. It is very im- 
portant that we make this report as 
each Conference officer has her report 
to send to the Woman's Missionary 
Council and if we don't report from 
each Auxiliary how can she report? 

Let each Corresponding Secretary 
realize whom she serves and pray 
that she may become a model Corres- 
ponding Secretary. 

Mrs. W. B. Pickens, 

Charlotte, N. C. 



"I WILL NOT LEAVE YOU COM- 
FORTLESS" 

Hear the pledge of Jesus Christ: 
"I will not leave you comfortless; I 
will come unto you. Lo! I am with 
you alway, even unto the end of the 
world." As long as God lives and our 
souls live, so long does this pledge 
stand. It is true, we cannot always 
feel this presence. But we can al- 
ways know that it is there, always 
think of it, so long as thought endures, 
always rest upon it forever and for- 
ever; and the reason why this prom- 
ise is given is that we may hold fast 
to the truth. There may be a moment 
in the very depth of sorrow and an- 
guish when the presence is hidden 
from us. But is it not because we are 
stunned, unconscious? 

It is like passing through a surgi- 
cal operation. The time comes for 
the ordeal. The anasthetic is ready. 
You stretch out your hand to your 
friend, "Don't leave me, don't forsake 
me." The last thing you feel is the 
clasp of that hand, the last thing you 
see is the face of that friend. Then 
a moment of darkness, a blank — and 
the first thing you see is the face of 
love again. So the angel of God's 
face stnds by us, bends above us, 
and we may know that he will be 
there e^en when all else fails. . . . 
Amid the mists that shroud the great 
ocean beyond the verge of mortal life, 
there is one sweet, mighty Voice that 
says, "I will never leave thee. In all 
thy afflictions I will be with thee, and 
the angel of My face shall save thee." 
— Henry Van Dyke, D.D. 



THE CROSS 

Nothing has ever convinced the 
world of forgiveness likethe Cross of 
Christ. Nothing has so melted the 
hard unbelief with which fear and sin 
have surrounded our nature, as this 
sweet message of God's redempetion, 
in giving up His only son for us all. 
Like the ice upon some Apine peak 
that has resisted the stormy winds 
of winter, but flows down in sparkling 
rivulets when the warm breezes of 
spring blow, so hearts long congealed 
with fear and remorse will melt and 
flow down in gentle grief and holy 
aspiration because of the warm in- 
fluence of divine love. The changed 
spiritbegins to thrill with the emotions 
of pardon and expectancy, as we hear 
of the transaction of infinite pity re- 
vealed in the Savior's death. This 
Cross proclaims the release, which all 
who have fallen under the bondage of 
sin require. And there can be no more 
peaceful, no more stimulating message 
than that which the church is embol- 
dened to give because of the Cross, 
"I believe in the forgiveness of sins." 
— Falconer. 



GEORGIA MARBLE SURVIVES SE- 
VEREST TEST 

Mr. O. W. Norcross, of Wbrchester, 
Mass., one of the largest contractors 
and builders in the United States, 
and a recognized authority, has this to 
say regarding Georgia Marble. 

"In my opinion, the Georgia Marble 
has no superior as a building material. 
I have for several years made an ex- 
haustive investigation into buildings, 
from all sources and information 
possible, as regards marble. I have 
carefully examined buildings that 
have been built and are now in exis- 
tence, and from this observation and 
research, have come to the conclusion 
that a marble of the construction and 
ingredients of the Georgia marble, 
will be a most lasting stone. It is a 
fact that the nearer any material is of 
one ingredient the more even it will 
wear, and of all the marbles that have 
come under my observation, the 
Southern marble answers all the re- 
quirements for a strong, durable and 
lasting stone. It is so made up, and 
so impenetrable to moisture, that 
while ordinary stones, even granite, 
would wear with rounded coiners, 
the Georgia Marble will remain with 
its corners perfect, sharp and clean." 

A most severe test of the absorbing 
qualities of Georgia Marble is to take 
a small cube, drill a hole in the center, 
fill it with common writing ink and 
use it a few months as an ink stand. 
Such a test has been made, and al- 
though this ink stand was in constant 
use, the marble did not absorb the ink 
any more than one made of glass. 
\pply the same test to any other mar- 
ble, and the ink will be absorbed in 
a few hours. 

Mr. Norcross continues as follows: 
"It cannot be discolored by any ordi- 
nary means such as tend to discolor 
buildings. Near the Ames building 
on Bedford street, Boston, there oc- 
curred a large fire; this fire, with the 
soot, dirt and dust arising from it, 
discolored the Ames building, which 
is built of yellow brick with Georgia 
Marble trimmings. A few days ago 
we washed down the front of the Ames 
Building with nothing but cold water 
and a stiff brush, without any acid. 
The building washed down perfectly 
clean and white, and just as fresh as 
the day it was put up. I am sure this 
result cannot be obtained with any 
other building material, not even 
granite. In Gwilt's Encyclopedia of 
Architecture there is a description of 
Parian marble, which outlasted all 
other marbles. You will notice it is 
nearly all carbonate of lime; that it is 
a crystalline formation and translu- 
cent. The description of Parian 
marble here would answer the de- 
scription of Georgia Marble, and in 
my opinion, the Georgia Marble bears 
a strong resemblance to the Parian 
marble of ancient times." 

The crushing strength of Georgia 
Marble is upwards of 10,000 pounds 
and withstands heat to upwards of 
1,000 degrees. It can be had in any 
size pattern and any shade desired, 
with prompt deliveries. It is equally 
as suitable (if not more so) for monu- 
mental purposes as it is for buildings. 
Ask your dealer to show you samoles 
of Cherokee, Creole, Kennesaw and 
Etowah Georgia Marble, and if he 
can't supply you, drop a card to the 
Georgia Marble Co., Tate, Ga., and 
they will put you in touch with a near- 
by dealer who can. 



PAINS ALL OVER. 



Huston, Tex. — "For five years," 
says Mrs. L. Fulenchek, of this place, 
"I suffered with pains all over, es- 
pecially in my back and side, and was 
so weak I could hardly do my house 
work. A friend told me of Cardui. 
Since taking it, I feel so much better! 
Now I can do all my housework and 
ppins don't bother me any more at 
all." ' Cardni is a strength-building 
medicine. Fifty years of success have 
produced, amonest its many users, 
confidence in Cardui and what it will 
do. During this time, Cardui has re- 
lieved the female ailments of over a 
million women. Why not yours? Try 
it today. Your duggist seils it. 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by H. A. Hayes, Superintendent 



THE MOTHERLESS CHILD 

"Poor little desolate, motherless child, 
Life's storms are beating thee fearful- 
ly wild; 

Nowhere to shelter the poor little 
head, 

No one to love thee — thy mother is 
dead. 

"Then, oh, for the sake of our baby 
above. 

Who the Father took from us in wis- 
dom and love, 

For the sake of the Christ who on 
little ones smiled, 

Let us love and protect the motherless 
child." 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING 

The regular quarterly meeting of 
the Executive Committee was held in 
the office of the Superintendent at the 
the Home on January 9th. Only rou- 
tine business was transacted. All the 
members of the Committee were pres- 
ent. They inspected the new build- 
ing and expressed themselves as great- 
ly pleased with the building and es- 
pecially gratified that we had secured 
so good a building at such low cost. 

There was much valuable discussion 
of plans for future development. These 
brethren have large and important 
places in business and Church activi- 
ties. But they do not hesitate to de- 
vote their best thousht and effort to 
the affairs of our Children's Home. 
They are persuaded that the Church 
is doing fio more important work. The 
members of the committee are nr. T. 
F. Marr, Dr. H. K. Bover. Rev. Harold 
Turner. Mr. C. H. Ireland, and Mr. 
James K. Norfleet. 



A GOOD HOUSE 



of big double doors we can have space 
for two hundred people. So this is 
another use for this building — it serves 
as a chapel. 



This building is of brick laid in red 
mortar, with granite trimminsrs. It 
has br^ad norc'ies with fluted columns. 
It contains twelve rooms, besides 
laree basement and attic rooms. Is 
commodious and comfortable, and is 
■well built throughout. It is heated bv 
hot. water, lighted by electricitv. and 
has complete equipment of plumbing 
and sewerage connections. 

It is a soMd and substantial struc- 
ture, but it is also very handsome in 
appearance. 

The Cost 

The cost of the building will reach 
close to eieht thousand dol'ars, ex- 
elusive of heating and plumbing and 
li<rbt'ng systems. We built it with 
dav labor, under the personal suner- 
vision of the Superintendent. We h^d 
b'ds to put it un hv contract, but the 
cheapest bid was $10,450. 

A Full House 

In this building we have the general 
storage room in which are kept all 
the supplies for the whole institution, 
the offices of the Superintendent and 
the agent, the home of the Superinten- 
dent and his family, living quarters 
for thirteen children, and at this time 
the fifth and sixth grades are taught 
here. 

At Home 

It certainly is nice to have a place 
where we can live without "scroug- 
ing." We have been crowded too close 
for health or comfort. Four in a bed! 
We are determined that we will not 
a?ain crowd up this way — not if we 
can help it. (Oh, that our people 
knew the terrible pressure we suffer 
to take children — needy children!) 

In our new home we can get the 1 
whole family together, children andr 
grown folks, for song and prayer 
service. By throwing open two sets 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS RE- 
CEIVED BY H. A. HAYES, SUPT. 
FOR WEEK ENDING JAN. 
13, 1912 

Rev. R. S. Howie, Pineville S. S., 
Pineville Circuit, $3.00; F. W. Camp- 
bell, Rutherford College S. S., Ruth- 
erford College and Connelly Springs 
Circuit, $1.00; T. R. Garner, First 
Church S. S., Salisbury Charge, $12; 
P. H. Booe, Love's S. S., Walkertown 
Charge, $6.00; R. F. Rozelle, Pleas- 
ant Grove S. S., Derita Circuit, $1.00; 
H. D. Duckworth, Seversville S. S., 
Chad wick and Seversville Charge, $5; 
R. F. Fentress, Pleasant Garden S. S., 
Pleasant Garden Charge, $2.00; C. F. 
Morrison, Wilkesboro S. S., Wilkes- 
boro Station, $3.10; A. C. Williams, 
Bethel S. S., Bethel Charge, $2.10; 
Jas: T. Smith, Wentworth S. S., Went- 
worth Circuit, $1.83; Mrs. Fred 
Baynes, Summerfield S. S. Summerfield 
Charge, $2.50; Jno. T. Pruett, Dallas 
S. S., Lowell and Dallas Charge, $3: 
R. E. Bundy, Jamestown S. S., Pomona 
Charge, $2.00: B. S. Higgins, Burns- 
ville S. S., Burnsville Station, $2.80: 
Geo. F. Rogers, Clyde S. S., Clyde 
Circuit, $1.00: J. F. "Steele, Unity S 
S., Kannapolis Charge, $.62: F. S. 
Johnston. Franklin S. S., Franklin Sta- 
tion, $6.25; Miss Delia Moffitt, Horse 
Shoe S. S., Mills River Charge, $2.00: 
J. C. Pepper, Trinity S. S., Randolph 
Circuit, $2.10; J. L. Broyles, Webster 
S. S., Webster Circuit, $1.00; W. H. 
Mock, Southside S. S., Southside and 
Salem Charge, $2.00; J. M. McGraw, 
Fp worth S. S., Concord, $2.76; 
Chas P. West, Weaverville S. S., 
Weaverville Station, $2.92; Mrs. Earl 
Feimster, Trinity S. S., Statesville 
Circuit, $1.00; C. A. Teague, Granite 
Falls S. S., Granite Falls Station, 
$5.56: Abe Womack, Main St. S. S., 
Reidsville Station. $22: C. D. Geer, 
Rutherfordton, $5.00: N. M. Thayer, 
Macedonia S. S.. Jackson Hill Ciarge, 
$1.00; Rev. C. M. Campbell, Davidson 
S. S., Davidson Station, $1.54; Rev. 
J. L. Smith, Carson's Chapel S. S., 
North Catawba Circuit, $2.08: T. A. 
Haithcock, Norwood S. S., Norwood 
Station, $14.91: Fli Tavlor, Mt. Har- 
mony S. S.. Connelly Springs and Ruth- 
erford College Charge, $1.00; L. H. 
Phillips, Newton S. S., Newton Charge. 
$5.62: A. H. Starnes, Oak Hill S. S.. 
Sulphur Springs Circuit, $1.28; Jas. C. 
Goforth, Dysortville S. S., Thermal 
City Circuit, $1.10; J. L. Sloan, Broad 
Street S. S., Broad Street Charge, 
Statesville, $26.13; W. E. Kreeger, 
Antioch S. S., Rural Hall Circuit, $1: 
Challie Brown, Bethany S. S., Rock 
Springs Charge, $1.00; E. B. Claywell, 
Morganton S. S., Morganton Station, 
$6.77; F. L. McGinn, Tryon Street 
Sunday S., Charlotte, $10.00; A. Z. 
Wright, Snow Hill, S. S., Sulphur 
Springs Circuit, $.75: Rev. J. A. J 
Farrington, No. Charlotte S. S., No. 
Charlotte Charge, $2.85; H. C. Smith, 
Trinity Sunday S., Charlotte, $8.74; 
Total, $187.31; Total collections re- 
ported to date for Fifth Sunday in De- 
cember, $371.52. 

Cash 

Morven Church, Forsyth Circuit, 
$1.00; Rev. O. P. Ader, Ramseur and 
Franklinville Charge, $10.50; Rev. 
Otho J. Jones, Holmes Memorial 
Church, Salisbury, $5.17; Rev. F. War- 
ren Dibble, West Concord Charge, $5; 
W. P. Ledbetter, Wadesboro Church, 
$67.49; Rev. T. B. Johnson, Stony 
Point Charge, $3.51; H. H. Robbins, 



Bethel Church, Asheville Charge, $5.40; 
J. R. Moore, General Support Fund, 
$40.00; H. C. Smith, Trinity Church, 
Charlotte, $10.38. Total, $148.45. 



OUR NEW BUILDING 

We are now 'occupying the first 
permanent building erected at our 
Children's Home — the High Point 
building. We are enjoying it and we 
are putting it to good use. 

REPORT OF JNO. F. KIRK, AGENT, 
FOR WEEK ENDING JAN. 13, 
1912, ON GENERAL BUILD- 
ING FUND 

Bel wood: A. G. Higgins, $7.00; Mrs. 

A. G. Higgins, $5.00. Burnsville: Rev. 

J. O. Ervin, $1.05. Danbury: Rev. 
I T. J. Folger, $1.00. Fllenboro: J. A. 

Cooper. Sr., $1.00. Fallston: Miss 
| Fdna Dickson, $5.00. Fletchers: T. 
I V. Carland, $10.00. Franklinville: 
J M. G. Buie. $2."0: High Point: J. D. 

Mnnn. $12 50. Henrietta: Mrs. W. H. 

Hvnes. $5.00: Lineolnton: D. M. Cline. 

$5.00. Newton: F. T. Cox, $10.00: Mrs. 

W. D. Misenheimer. $4.00. Reidsville: 

»i« St. q. S.. $20.00: Friendlv Class. 

$4.26. Salisbury: George Smith, $10: 

TTpjnr. v iile: L. S. Griffin, $25 25. 

^adesboro: J. T. Cooper, $12.00. 

■""adkinviMe: Rpv. and Mrs. J. D. 

Gibson, $10.00. Total, $150.06. 

On Notes 

Albemarle: R. L. Smith, $25.00: 
S. H. MiHon. $25.00; W. F. Snugsrs, 
«^.50. Concord: W. L. Robbins, $5. 
Morven: L. L. Williams, $5.00: M. 
t.. Ham, $in.n0: J. A. Dunman, $2 50. 
Monroe: W. H. P^ifer, $25.00: Sam 
■Phifer, $7.50. Madison: B. F. Mc- 
Gehee, $6.25. Marinn: H. H. Tate, 
$5.00. Waxhaw: K. G. Hudson. $5: 
L. V,. Brown, $50.00. Total on Notes, 
$173.75. Total on open subscrint'ons. 
$150.06. Grand total for week, $323. Si. 



When the years have slimned bv 
and memorv runs back over the path 
vou have trod, you will be glad you 
stopped to speak to everv friend you 
met. and left them all with a warmer 
feeling in their hearts because you 
did so. 

A REMARKABLE HONOR 



In 1R40. 7 members of Conpfress from 
North Carolina. 94 members of the State 
L^srislature. ard the Mavor and 42 leading 
citizens of Ralnish. N. C. united in pre- 
senting a petition to the Pireoto rof the 
MerHral Rurear of the United States Navy, 
whieh closes with the fallowing words. — 
"While all can testify to the high repu- 
tation this medicine sustains in the re- 
spective counties we have the honor to 
■epresent. many of us know, by happy ex- 
lerience in our own fnmilies. its efficacy: 
'herefore. we can with mueh propriety. 
• nd do with great pleasure give Dr. fjrqv 
ur names in support of his truly valuable 
■irtment." 

For three generations Gray's Ointment 
'as held first place in the treatment of 
■oils carbuncles, chronic sores, festering 
ii ts and wounds, and In the prevention 
f blood poisoning. Free sample op re- 
uest or 25c at your druggist's. Dr. W. 

Gray & Co., 815 Gray Bldg., Nashville, 
Cenn. 



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Winnsboro Blue Granite does not 
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Write for the name of mix nearest 
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fc; *y\ hatiohal co-operative reaitycj 



U R. MARDES 
President 



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JOIN THE ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB 



SEE ANNOUNCEMENT 
ON BACK COVER 



January 18, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



Our Little Folks 




SKATING SONG 

Hurrah for the wind that is keen and 
chill, 

As it strikes the meadows and sweeps 
the hill! 

Hurrah for the pulses of swift delight 
That tingle and beat in the winter's 
night, 

When over the crystal lake we glide, 
Flying like birds o'er the frozen tide! 
Hurrah for the lad with the sparkling 
eye, 

For the joyous laugh and the courage 
high! 

Hurrah for the health that is glad and 
strong, 

So this life is gay as a merry song; 
For the motion fearless, smooth, and 
fleet, 

When skates are wings to the flying 
feet! 

Hurrah for the landscape broad and 
fair 

Spread boldly out in the brilliant air! 
Hurrah for the folds of the sheeted 
snow, 

On the mountains high, in the valleys 
low! 

Hurrah for the track where the skat- 
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Fearless as over a highway tried! 

Who chooses may boast of the summer 
time; 

Hurrah, we cry, for the frost and 
rime, 

For the icicle's pendent from the roof 

and eaves, 
For snow that covers the next year's 

sheaves! 

Hurrah for the gleaming, glassy lake 
Where the skaters bold their pleas- 
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— The Children's Friend. 



DUTY FIRST 

When I was a little girl, my grand- 
mother taught me to knit. Every after- 
noon I was expected to sit in my lit- 
tle chair beside her and do six 
"purls." 

One day, two of my little friends 
were waiting outside for me to play 
with them, and in my haste I dropped 
a stitch, and twisted two or three more, 
so that my work was badly uneven. 

When my grandmother looked at it, 
she said: 

"I am very sorry, Mary, but this 
will not do at all. You will have to 
ravel it out. as far as the dropped 
stitch and do it over again." 

"But not now, grandmamma!" I beg- 
ged. "Ruth and Janet are waiting, 
and I want to go so very much. Let 
me finish my stint when I come in 
again." 

"No, Mary," said grandmother, gent- 
ly, but firmly. "I can not let you go 
until this is done properly. 

Although I loved my grandmother 
dearly, I felt that this was very unkind 
of her. I said no more, but there was 
anger in my heart. I knitted as fast as 
I could, and, when the last stitch was 
taken, ran away without stopping to 
kiss her. 

I played with the children for a good 
while, but somehow I did not feel alto- 
gether happy, and I was really glad 
when they went home and left me free 
to go into the house again. 

T looked for my grandmother, but 



she was not in her chair. My mother 
explained that she felt weary, and had 
gone to her own room to lay down. 

"But can't I see her tonight?" I 
asked. 

"Yes," answered my mother. "I am 
to take her supper to her by and by, 
and you may go with me." 

When supper was ready, I begged to 
be allowed to carry in the tray myself 
with grandmother's tea and toast upon 
it. She was sitting up in bed, leaning 
against the pillows, and, when she saw 
me, a lovely smile lighted up her sweet 
old face. 

"Here's my handy little maid!" she 
said. 

I set the tray on the light stand be 
side the bed, where she could reach it 
p asily. It seemed to me that she look 
ed very pale. 

"Oh, grandmamma," said I, "are you 
ill?" 

"No, Mary dear, only a bit tired 
The tea will, no doubt, do me good.' 

"Grandmamma," said I, going clospr 
to her and laying my cheek on be>- 
hand, "I am sorry I was vexed. Wil 1 
you forgive me?" 

"Dear little girl, I forgave you be- 
fore you asked. It made my hear* 
ache to keep you In, but I knew it wa? 
best. Suppose you had the stint to do 
now?" 

"Oh, grandmamma, I believe I should 
be too sleepy to see the stitcbps!" 

"Then you wil] not forsret the lessor 
T mean to teach you — that to put dutv 
first and pleasure afterward is the onb- 
wav to be either useful or happy." 

I slept late next morniner, and when 
at last my mother came to waken ra> 
there were marks of tears on her 
"hppks. 

"Oh, mamma, what is the matter." 
T said. "There is nothins reaHv th> 
matter," she answered, though her 
voW was tremblinsr. "Something s'- 
■beautiful has hanpened that we mu? + 
not grieve. Pear grandmother wen* 
awav to heaven last night in her 
sleen." 

That was manv, many years ago 
vet. whenever I am temnted to put off 
until another time what oueht to bo 
done now, I seem to see the prettv 
room, the dainty tea-tray, and mv 
eTandmother's lovelv face, and to h°ar 
asrain her sweet voice telline me what 
to do with a dutv. — Mrs. Mary A. P. 
Stansbury, in Epworth Herald. 



You be faithful and God will take 
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Page Twelva 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON 
JANUARY 21, 1912 



III- 



The Birth of Jesus. Luke 2:1-20 

Golden Text — For there is born to 
you this day in the city of David a 
Saviour, who is Christ the Lord. 
Luke 2:11. 

The Shepherds 

Who were these shepherds? Why 
were they selected to hear the great 
announcement? We may be sure that 
there is a whole moral and spiritual 
history of preparation on the part of 
these men for the great event. It was 
unconscious preparation, but it was 
preparation for all that. They were 
not just a group of heavy-minded men 
preoccupied with the round of their 
material tasks. They kept sheep, but 
they thought much about the Messi- 
anic Kingdom. In the quiet of the night 
while their sheep were safe beside 
them, many a time they had talked 
together of the great old days of their 
nation's life. Ancient stories of heroic 
righteousness and faithfulness to Je- 
hovah, ancient words from prophets 
who had stirred Jerusalem by their 
mighty speech, fell from the lips of 
these pious shepherds. Thev were 
everyday men, but the light of the 
Eternal had fallen across their path- 
way and they rejoiced in it. There 
were other groups of shepherds to 
whom it would have been impossible 
for the angeMc messenger to come with 
the great things. 

Little did these shepherds think, 
as they filled their minds and hearts 
"with great thoughts about Jehovah 
and His ways with men, that any an- 
gel of the Lord would come to them 
with a great revelation of new days 
to come. They were trying to under- 
stand and be loyal to the best of the 
past, and this really fitted them to 
meet the future with understanding 
minds and sympathetic hearts. All 
our days of quiet thought about thf 
great things of life and of simple 
faithfulness to the behests of God ar' 
days of preparation. We are prepar 
ing for larger things to come. Al 
though no shining angel flashes forth 
in the night to speak to us, our liveF 
are being filled with that sympathy 
with the purposes of God which wil' 
one day flower into rich experience 
and noble activity. 

The Great Announcement 

Probably on this very night the 
shepherds were talking together ol 
the things of God. There was an at- 
mosphere full of appreciation of the 
real mission of their people all about 
them, when suddenly an angel stood 
before them in the midst of a perfeel 
splendor of shining light. The simple 
men of the field were fairly overcome 
with fear. Then a voice full of all 
gentle sweetness spoke to them. Let 
fear be banished. The angel had come 
as a messenger of hope and not as a 
messenger of doom. A Saviour hat' 
been born in the city of David. H' 
was the great Messiah of Israel's hope 
At Bethlehem the shepherds would 
find the Babe wrapped in swaddling 
clothes and lying in a manger. 

It was a great message which the 
angel spoke. The day of Israel's long 
forward look had come at last. The 
One foreseen by prophets and poets 
and longed after by pious ancient 
kings had come. The day of prepar- 
ation was over. The day of consum- 
mation had arrived. And to a com- 
pany of lowly shepherds, morally and 
spiritually prepared to hear it, the 
great announcement was made. 

The outstanding impression made 
on the shepherds by the word of the 



angel was a sense of the present ac- 
tivity of Jehovah. They knew that 
their people had been wonderfully led 
by God in that glorious past of which 
they thought so much; they knew 
that the Lord of Hosts had bared His 
arm to save His people in ancient 
days; but this night they felt, as they 
had never felt before, that God is at 
work in the affairs of men now. He 
is not an absent God. He is a present 
God. He is not an inactive Deity. He 
is the God of ceaseless labor in behalf 
of men. The God of the fathers had 
not withheld His mercy from their 
children. As this came home to the 
shepherds their hearts were filled wit' 
sacred joy. 

The Angelic Chorus 

But the wonders of this night* had 
not come to an end. Suddenly the 
lonely angelic messenger was multi- 
plied to a great host. The heavens 
seemed full of bright, shining figures, 
all tremulous and enraptured by a 
great, possessing joy. They burst 
forth into song. All the sky seemed 
articulate in a great heavenly har- 
mony. The lofty upreaching chorus 
first gave praise to God. Solemn, in 
creasing in volume and thrilling with 
devotion came the words, "Glory to 
God in the Highest." The earth war 
indeed full of the glory of the Lord 
that night, then came heaven's great 
word of blessing and benediction to 
the children of men: "And on earth 
peace among men in whom he is well 
pleased." A great down-reaching love 
seemed to embrace the shepherds while 
they listened. Then slowly the vision 
faded. The sound subsided into sil- 
ence. The shepherds were once more 
alone with their sheep, but those fields 
were forever sacred to these humble 
men. For here, at their work, with 
their sheep beside them, they had 
seen the heavenly glory and heard the 
voices of angelic praises. Here they 
had received the tidings that the great 
Messiah had come. These fields were 
forever a sanctuary to the shepherds 
who had seen the vision in the night. 

The angels spoke the benediction 
of a great peace. Jesus Himself said, 
"I came not to send peace, but a 
sword." At first one would be inclin- 
?d to feel that there is a contradic- 
tion between the angelic conception of 
:he work of Jesus and the conception 
if our Lord Himself, but the contra- 
diction is only on the surface. Jesus 
lame to make peace between God and 
men. The great result of His work 
's.the gift of complete peace with God. 
Tn a world full of evil, however, there 
are battles to fight on the way to a 
righteous peace. It is not an impo- 
tent peace, but a peace of triumphant 
righteousness, which is to be the last 
word of the reign of Jesus. So, while 
multitudes of men and women are re- 
ceiving the gift of peace from Him, 
and while the consummation of His 
Kingdom is the reign of peace, it is 
also true that it was sent forth a sword 
to fight all evil and sin. He is both 
the Prince of Peace and the captain 
of the flashing sword. 

Going to Bethlehem 

The shepherds were not contented 
with a beautific vision. They proceed- 
ed to Bethlehem. They made a prac- 
tical investigation. They found Jo- 
seph and Mary and the little Child. 
Then, having confirmed the verity of 
their experience, they went back to 
their work, but it was never quite the 
same work. It made a difference even 
to keep sheep in a world where the 
Messiah was living. 

There are a great many people whe 
have wonderful visions of the mean 
ing of life. In some sunlit hour the 
privilege of service and the possibil! 
ties of the race stand out before then- 
all shining in heavenly light. Most 
people at one time or another during 
their lives see noble visions. 

But a great many people never take 



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their visions seriously. They never 
journey to Bethlehem. They enjoy the 
wonder of the beautific hour, but they 
do nothing as a result of it, and by 
and by its very memory is lost in all 
the intricate business of practical life. 
They cease to be men who hear an- 
gelic voices and become merely men 
engrossed with sheep. 

The hour of noble upreach of the 
heart, the hour of realization and the 
hour of vision, must be carried into 
activity if its meaning is to be kept. 
You can capture a dream only by work- 
ing for its practical realization. The 
worth of a great hour of inspiration 
depends on whether it becomes a 
mere emotional memory or the source 
of a new activity in the life of the 
man to whom the hour was given. 
We may be sure that more than the 
fields were transfigured to the shep- 
herds who heard the angelic announce- 
ment. Life itself was transfigured 
and ennobled because of that wonder- 
c ul night. They did more than take 
l he journey to Bethlehem. They liveu 
in the light of Bethlehem all the rest 
of their lives. — N. Y. Christian Advo- 
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January 18, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SECRETARY'S 
REGISTER 



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The one year book Is divided 
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and one section of 8 pages. 

Each one of the 28-page sec- 
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two pages for each of the thir- 
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Quarterly Report. Each report 
consists of ' two pages, one for 
statistical report, one for finan- 
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The 8-page section, which 
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Epworth League 



Editor of League Columns 

Miss Blanche Johnson 
walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 



MISSIONS 

(Continued) 

13. Who was the first missionary 
o Mexico? 

Rev. J. T. Daves, 1873. 

14. How many missionaries have 
we in Mexico? 

15. Who was the first missionary 
to Brazil? 

Rev. J. J. Ransom, 1876. 

16. How many missionaries have 
sve now in Brazil? 

17. Who was our first missionary 
to Japan? 

D. J. W. Lambuth. 

18. How many misionaries have 
we now in Japan? 

19. Who was our first missionary 
to Korea? 

Dr. C. F. Reid. 

20. How many have we now in 
Korea? 

21. Who was our first missionary 
to Cuba? 

Rev. H. B. Someillan. 

22. How many missionaries have 
we in Cuba? 

23. What is the oldest mission or- 
ganized in our Church? 

The Indian mission, organized in 
1844. 

24. What is the present member- 
ship of our Indian Mission? 

25. What is the membership of 
each of our Foreign Missions? 

26. Is there a missionary in the 
foreign field from this Conference? 
From this District? From this 
Church? 

27. Why was special work taken up 
by the women of our church? 

To help bring the Gospel to heathen 
women who could not be reached by 
men. 

28. When was this work recognized 
by our General Conference? 

In 1848 Woman's Board of Foreign 
Missions was organized by the Gener- 
al Conference which convened in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

29. Who were the leaders in the 
movement? 

Mrs. Juliana Hayes, Mrs. D. H. Mc- 
Gavoc and Mrs. Elizabeth Kelly. 

30. Where have they established 
niissions? 

In China, Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Cu- 
ba and among the Indian tribes. 

31. How many workers do they em- 
ploy now? 

Fifty-five missionaries, one hundred 
and sixty-four teachers and native 
workers, sixty-five Bible women (1901). 

32. When were the children organ- 
ized into societies? 

In May 1890, outcome of a reso- 
lution offered by Mrs. Julia McClung, 
of Knoxville, Tenn. 



PLEDGE 

Any league may, with the approval 
of the pastor, require its members to 
take the following pledge: 

"I hereby promise, with the help 
of God, to try always to do right; to 
read the Holy Scriptures, and pray 
every day; and also to regularly at- 
tend the meetings of the League, and 
be governed by its regulations." 



Rev. C. S. Kirkpatrick, Superinten- 
dent of the Boy Scout Movement, finds 
himself very busy in his new work 
at Canton. He promises to let us 
hear from him a little later. 



MOCKSVILLE SENIOR LEAGUE 

A new Senior League has just been 
organized by our Conference President 
in his new charge at Mocksville and 
the names of the officers are: 

Milton Call — President. 

Miss Ruth Booe — 1st Vice-president. 

Miss Ivey Nail — 2nd Vice-President. 

Miss Mary Heitman — 3rd Vice-Pres- 
ident. 

Miss Marie Allison — 4th Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Hoyt Blackwood — Secretary. 
Miss Sarah Hanes — Treasurer. 
Miss Matha Clement — Epworth Era 
Agent. 

Miss Linda Clement — Reporter. 
Miss Marie Allison — Organist. 



HICKORY SENIOR LEAGUE 

The following program was given 
by the Hickory Leaguers and we are 
indebted to Miss Stanly Hall for the 
report of this most interesting meet- 
ing. 

Christmas Scenes from Ben-Hur. 
Song. 

Scripture lesson — Matthew 2:1-12. 
Roby Chester. 
Prayer. 

Reading — Christmas Sun — Miss Har- 
ris. 

Reading — A Midnight Scene — Mr. I. 
Schell. 

Reading — The Shepherds' Visits — 
Miss Arthur. 

Talk— The Call of the Wise Men- 
Mr. West. 

Reading — The Visit of the Wise Men 
— Miss Bonner. 

Song. 

League benediction. 



DAVIDSON JUNIORS 

That this live band of small people 
are still doing things is evidenced by 
the report from the Jr. Superinten- 
dent., as follows: 

1 am glad to say our Junior League 
is in good condition and we are still 
getting new members. The last Sat- 
urday before Christmas, our pastor, Mr. 
Campbell, and I took the Juniors over 
and pounded the old Finch sisters. 
They seemed to be so thankful and 
the children all enjoyed it. 

Callie Chris tenberry, 

Junior Supt. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

1. Roll Call. 

2. Reading minutes. 

3. Reports from departments. 

4. Reports from committees. 

5. Proposals for membership. 

6. Reception of members. 

7. Miscellaneous business. 

8. Adjournment. 

BENEDICTION 

Num. 6:24-26. 

Leader — The Lord bless thee and 
keep thee. 

League — The Lord make His face to 
shine upon thee and be gracious unto 
tht,e. 

All — The Lord lift up His counten- 
ance upon thee and give thee peace. 
A.nan. 



The editor acknowledges with pleas- 
ure the holiday greetings received 
from a number of Leaguers in this 
and other Conferences. 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND 
BUILD UP THE SYSTEM 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula Is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing it is simply 
Quinine and Iron in a tasteless form, and 
the most effectual form. For grown peo- 
ple and children. 50 cents. 




Fresh 
From the Ocean 

The appetizing deep-sea freshness is 
secured by cooking and packing the fish 
within a few hours after they are 
caught. Hermetically sealed and with- 
out preservative the ocean flavor is still 
in the food when you open the tin. 



Fish Flakes 

10c — two sizes — 75c 

Kearny for instant use in preparing delicious 
CODFISH BALLS. CREAMED FISH. 

FISH HASH. CHOWDER and other 
dainties — No soaking, picking cr boiling — 
keeps in any climate. 

At your grocers everywhere, or mail us 10c 
and receive a full-size 10c package, prepaid. 

FREE--" Good Eating" a hook of recipts by tht 
editor of the "Boston Cooking School Magazine." 

BURNHA1U & MORRILL CO. 
Portland, Maine, U. S. A. 



CHAS. W. MOSELEY, M. D. 

Practice Limits* te 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
Over Farlss- Klutz Drug Company 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office phons 671 Residence 184* 

Office: 121 8 Elm Street 
Hours: 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

ff p. tv te • st. ra. 

Red Letter Bible Free 

1,000 very fine Red Letter Bihles to be 
given away for a slight service. Grand 
opportunity to get a good Bible without 
cost. Write immediately for full particu- 
lars free. HOUSEHOLD BIBLE CLUB, 
810 Jackson Street, Topeka, Kan. 

BLACK MOLASSES 

Best and rlienpest slock fond discovered 
$7.00 PER ARREL 
Write for fu 1 Information regarding ration . etc. 
J. J. GARVEY CO., New Orleam. La. 




Kprice, service,^ 
/ durability x 

is the claim we make for 

Waterloo Boy 

GASOLINE ENGINES 

The product of many years* experience, built of the 
best material that money can buy and in large quan- 
tities. Simple in construction, these engines possess 
more value for the money than any other gasoline 
engines on the market. 

Waterloo Boy Gasoline Engines are Guar- 
anteed engines. They are guaranteed 
to satisfy any reasonable man. They are 
guaranteed to develop the actual horse 
power as rated. They are guaranteed 
against defective material and workman- 
ship for five years. 

If you are looking for full value for your 
money, satisfactory service and fair deal- 
ing, write the 
WATERLOO GASOLINE J 
ENGINE COMPANY, ^30 
^407 W. 3rd Ave.. Waterloo, Iowa.yr»**£i 
nrnriri-illM— in ii mum insimsissr TRIAL 



Read the Story 



of The 
Hero Boys 
Page 16 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



A TRIAL GAVE INSTANT RELIEF — 
THE GREAT KIDNEY REMEDY 
NEVER DISAPPOINTS 



Being broken down in health, suffer- 
ing with Kidney Trouble, despairing 
of ever being well again, I was advis- 
ed by a friend to try Dr. Kilmer's 
Swamp-Root which gave me instant 
relief, and after using several bottles, 
I am now sound and well, and can 
safely recommend Swamp-Root to any- 
one suffering with back or kidney 
troubles. 

I also had rheumatism and I have 
had more relief from Dr. Kilmer's 
Swamp-Root than any other remedy. 
A sufficient trial will convince anybody 
of the merits of Swamp-Root. 
Yours very truly, 

P. E. NELSON, 
Murphy, N. C. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 17th day of July, 1909. 

EDMUND B. NORVEDL,, 

Notary Public, 
Cherokee County, N. C. 



Letter 'o 
Dr K lmer & f"o., 
B ngh mion, N. Y. 



Prove What Swamp-Root Will Do for 
You 

Send to Dr. Kilmer & Co., Bingham- 
ton, N. Y., for a sample bottle. It will 
convince any one. You will also re- 
ceive a booklet of valuable informa- 
tion, telling all about the kidneys and 
bladder. When writing, be sure and 
mention the Greensboro Weekly 
Christian Advocate. Regular 50-cent 
and one-dollar size bottles for sale 
at all drug stores. 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws 
and Regulations in the postoflice in 
Greensboro. N. C, as mail matter of 
the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.50 

31x months 76 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 
per year. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION, (Inc.) 

D. B. Coltrane, President Concord 

.iev. J. R. Scioggs, V-Pies Charlotte 

."I. Li. Eure, Secretary Greensboro 

.V. G. Hradshaw High Point 

T. C. Hoyle Greensboio 



Will Cure That Cough 




Don't fool yourself into the belief 
that a "slight co'd" cr a "cold in the 
head" h but a litlle thing. Every 
"cold" is a fever, a~d unchecked, 
may result in death. "Whenyou apply 

VCroapandeiljyf 
*J Pneumonia y?JnyL a L 

you cure your cough and your lungs at 
one and the same time, through inhalation 
and absorption. The healing, antiseptic and 
germ destroying vapors are inhaled with 
each breath. It cleans away the sores 
and inflammation, sets the lungs moving 
strong and true. 

Always have a jar on hand for instant 
use — don't wait until you are attacked to 
send to the druggist for it. 

"Please s^nd me one hall dozen jars of 
yourVick's Croup SJve, which I liave 
|-»und so excellent for the past few years. 
Enclosed find $1 .50. 

MRS. WM. H. KNOWLES 

Pensacola, Fla. J 

At yonr druggist's or by mail. 

25c, 50c, $1.00 

Economy suggests 
the Dollar Size. 

Vick's Family 
Remedies Co. 
Green'bo-o, - N. C. 




Tobacco Habit Banished 

DR. ELDERS' TOBACCO BOON BANISHES all 
forms of Tobacco Habit in 72 to 120 hours. A posi- 
tive, quick and permanent relief. Easy to take. 
No craving for Tobacco after the first dose. Ono 
to three boxes for all ordinary cases. Wfl guaran- 
tee results in every case or refund money. Send 
for our free booklet giving full information. 
Elders' Sanatarium. Dopt. 60 St. Joseph, Mo. 



ASHEVILLE DISTRICT 

D. Atkins, Presiding Elder 
Weaverville, N. C. 

Mars Hill, Beach Glen Jan. 20-21 

Marshall, Marshall Jan. 27-28 

Hut Springs Jan. 28-29 

Central Feb. 4 

Haywood Feb. 4 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 
J. R. Scroggs, Presiding Elder 
Chanotte, N. C. 

Prospect, Bethlehem Jan. 20 

Monroe, Central Jan. 21 

Monroe, N. Monroe Jan. 21 

Alisohville, Ansonville Jan. 27-28 

Lrilesville, Lilisville Jan. 28-29 

Marsh ville, Marshville Feb. 3-4 

Polkton, Polklon Feb. 4-5 

Onionvllle, Zion ....Feb. 10-11 

Derita, L>erita Feb. 17 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT 

J. E. Gay, Presiding Elder 
Frankin, N. C. 

Webster Circuit, at Webster, ..Jan. 20-21 

Andrews Jan. 27-28 

JuUson Circuit, at Judson Feb. 3-4 

Murphy Circuit, at Roger's Feb. 10-11 

Murphy Station Feb. 11-12 

Waynesville Circuit, at Led ford's, 

Feb. 17-18 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT 
W. R. Ware, Presiding Elder 
• Greensboro, N. C. 

Second Round 

High Point, Washington St., 11 a. m., 

Jan. 21 

High Point, South Main, night.. Jan. 21 
West Greensboro Ct., Friendship, 

Jan. 27-28 
Walnut St., and Car. Memorial, nignt, 

Jan. 28 

Spring Garden St., 11 a. m Feb. 4 

Pomona Ct., Zion, 3 p. m Feb. 4 

Greensboro, Centenary, 11 a. m., Feb. 11 
B. Greensboro, Whitsett, 4 p. m., Feb. 11 
Greensboro, West Market St., night, 

Feb. 11 

Ruffin Ct., Lowe's Feb. 18-19 

Reidsville, night Feb. 18 

Wentworth, Mt. Carmel Feb. 24-25 

Randleman and N. Naomi March 2-3 

Uwharrie, Mt. Shepherd March 9-10 

Asheboro Ct., West Bend ..March 10-11 

Asheboro Station, night March 10-11 

Denton, Clarksburg March 16-17 

Ramseur and Franklinville, Ramseur, 

March 23-24 

Liberty Ct., Old Randolph . .March 24-25 
Randolph Ct., Pleasant Hill, March 30-31 

Coleridge April 6-7 

Pleasant Garden Ct., Pleasant Garden, 

April 13-14 



MORGANTON DISTRICT 
R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 

Bakersville, at Bakersville Jan.' 20-21 

Spruce Pine, at Mt. Vernon ..Jan. 27-28 

Table Rock, at Oak Hill Feb. 3-<t 

Morganton Station, at night ..Feb. 2-4 
Morganton Circuit, at Gilboa, Feb. 10-11 
Connelly Springs and Rutherford Col- 
lege, at Harmony, Feb. 17-18 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT 
R. M. Taylor, Presiding Elder 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Jonesville, Jpnesvllle Jan. 21-22 

Elkin Station Jan. 22-23 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain, 

Jan. 28-29 

Second Round 

Stokesdale Feb. 10-11 

Walnut Cove, Pine Hall Feb. 17-18 

Madison and Mayodan Feb. 18-19 

Rural Hall Feb. 24-25 

Danbury March 2-3 

Summerfield, Lee's Chapel ....March 9-10 
Mt. Airv Circuit, Epworth ..March 16-17 

Mt. Airy Station March 18-19 

East Bend, Mt. Pleasant March 23-24 

Yadkinville, Yadkinville March 24-25 

Dobson, Pleasant Ridge March 30-31 



Ask Your Doctor 

All run down, easily tired, thin, pale, nervous? And do not Know 
what to take ? Then go direct to your doctor. Ask his opinion 
of Ayer's non-alcoholic Sarsaparilla. No alcohol, no stimula- 
tion. A blood purifier, a nerve tonic, a strong alterative, an 
aid to digestion. Let your doctor decide. 

Lowell, Mara 




10,000 Pecan Trees 

Grafted to paper-shell variety, were carefully grown by us for our own 
planting, but on account of not getting land ready for them this season, we 
offer them for sale. 

Other Nurseries are already cleaned upon Pecan Trees, although the 
season lasts until March. Ours is now the only complete stock in the whole 
country. 

Grafted trees begin bearing in a few years and continue for generations. 
Nothing increases the value of a Southern farm like a Pecan Orchard, which 
in a few years is worth $1,000 per acre. 

Every land owner should plant at least a few pecans. They are the 
surest, safest and most profitable investment. Ten acres means a fortune 
laid by for old age. 

No other section of our country has such an opportunity as this. 
Take advantage of it now, and send at once for our Price List. 



AMERICAN PECAN COMPANY, 



PALATKA, 



FLORIDA 



Jonesville April 6-7 

Elkin. April 7-8 

Pilot Mountain April 13-14 

Stoneville April 20-21 

Spray and Draper April 27-28 

Leaksville April 28-29 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 
M. H. Vestal, Presiding Elder 
North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Wilkes Circuit, Beulah Jan. 20-21 

North Wilkesboro Station Jan. 28-29 

Wilkesboro Station Feb. 4-5 

SALISBURY DISTRICT 
i. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Concord Circuit, Ulivet Jan. 20-21 

Concord, Forest Hill Jan. 21-22 

Woodleaf Circuit, Woodleaf Jan. 27-28 

Mount Pleasant, at Mount Pleasant, 

Feb. 3-4 

Salem Feb. 10-11 

New London at New London ..Feb. 17-18 

SHELBY DISTRICT 
S. B. Turrentine, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

Belwood, Palm Tree Jan. 20-21 

South Fork. Plateau Ian. 27-28 

STATES VILLE DISTRICT 
Lee T. Mann, Presiding Elder 
Lenoir, N. C. 
First Round 

Caldwell, Hudson Jan. 20-21 

Granite Falls .Jan. 2L-2a 

Lenoir Ct., South Lenoir Jan. 27-28 

Lenoir Jan. 28-29 

Whitnel, Whitnel, 3 p. m Jan. 28-29 

Mooresville Ct., Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Davidson .....Feb. 4-5 

Mooresville Feb. 11-12 

WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT 
L. T. Cordell, Presiding Elder 
Waynesville, N. C. 
First Round 

Spring Creek, Spring Creek ..Jan. 20-21 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Jan. 27-28 

Mill River, Avery's Creek Feb. 3-4 

Fines Creek, Fines Creek Feb. 10-11 

Brevard Circuit, Bosnian Feb. 17-18 

Brevard Station Feb. 24-25 

WINSTON DISTRICT 
Plato Durham, Presiding Elder 
Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

Davidson, Qood Hope Jan. 20-21 

Lewisville, Sharon Jan. 27-28 

Grace Jan. 28-29 

Davie, Hardison Feb. 3-4 

Mocksvllle Feb. 4-5 

Cooleemee Feb. 4-5 

Kernersvllle, Kernersvllle Feb. 10-11 

Southside and SHlnm. Snlem ....Feb. 11 

You will be glad that you shut your 
ears tight against the evil things men 
said about one another, and tried the 
best you could to stay the words wing- 
ed with poison. 



T 



OPIATES 
NARCOTICS 



FOLEY'S HONEY and TAB 

COMPOUND 

STOPS COUGHS - CURES COLDS 

For CROUP, BRONCHITIS, WHOOP. 
ING COUGH, LA GRIPPE COUGHS, 
HOARSENESS and ALL, COUGHS and 
COLDS. It is BEST and SAFEST foi 
CHILDREN and Tor GROWN PERSONS. 

The Genuine is in a Yellow Package 
For sale by ALL DEALERS Everywhere 



AGENTS WANTED 

Attractive Offer! 

WRITE AT ONCE 

JOHN A. YOUNG 8 SONS 

GREENSBORO NURSERIES 
Greensboro N. C. 



To the Small or 
O Large Investor 

by purchasing the Guaranteed 

7 Per Cent and Profit Participating 
Ten Year GOLD CERTIFICATES 

of Southland Estates Corporation. 

Based on Atlanta Hirrh Class Suburban Real Estate, 
with selling value of over $100,000 total assets pledged 
to secure this issue of only $>0.000, the security presents 
a splendid opportunity to the careful investor. These 
certificates carry a Guaranteed Interest of Seven Per 
Cent., coupon payable semi-annually and an additional 
participation with the stock of the Company up to 10 per 
cent Redeemable in five years at a premium of 5 per 
cent. Sold only at par. In deno—lnatlnns of $100 or 
multiples. The One Security in the World that never 
fails Is Real Estate. Here is a solid, sound, s re place 
for y ,ur savings. Send remittance today to West End 
Ban\, Atlanta, Ga„ or Southland Estates Corporator 
6th floor, Third National Bank Building Atlanta, ' 



JOIN THE ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB 



SEE ANNOUNCEMENT 
ON BACK COVER 



January 18. 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Smoke of Herbs 

Cures Catarrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 

This preparation of herbs, leaves, 
flowers and berries (containing no to- 
bacco or habit-forming drugs) is eith- 
er smoked in an ordinary clean pipe 
or smoking tube, and by drawing the 
medicated smoke into the mouth and 
inhaling into the lungs or sending it 
out through the nostrils in a perfectly 
natural way, the worse case of Catarrh 
can be eradicated. 

It is not unpleasant to use, and at 
the same time is entirely harmless, 
and can be used by man, woman or 
child. 

Just as catarrh is contracted by 
breathing cold or dust and ger-laden 
air, ust so this balmy antiseptic smok- 
ing remedy goes to all the affected 
parts of the air passages of the head, 
nose, throat and lungs. It can readily 
be seen why the ordinary treatments 
such as sprays, ointments, salves, 
liquid or tablet medicines fail — they 
do not and can not reach all the af- 
fected parts. 

If you have catarrh of the nose, 
throat or lungs, chocking, stopped-up 
feeling, colds, catarrhal headaches; 
if you are given to hawking and spit- 
ting, this simple yet scientific treat- 
ment should cure you. 

An illustrated book which goes 
thoroughly into the whole question of 
the cause, cure and prevention of ca- 
tarrh will, upon request be sent you by 
Dr. J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton street, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

He wil lalso mail you five days free 
treatment. You will at once see that 
it is a wonderful remedy, and as it 
only costs one dollar for the regular 
treatment, it is within the reach of 
everyone. It is not necessary to send 
any money — simply send your name 
and address and the booklet and free 
trial package will be mailed you im- 
mediately. 




WEPAY$80AM0NTH SALARY 

and furnish rig and all expenses to introdjce our 
guaranteed stock and poultry powders; money-back 
guarantee.outft fr^e;newplan;steady work. Address 
BIGLER CO., X 708, SPRI*ISFIELlJ, ILLINOIS 



CUT 
FLOWERS 

FOR 

ALL OCCASIONS 

Our florists are capable of 
producing the most beau- 
tiful designs for funerals 
when fresh and beautiful 
flowers are wanted. Out 
of town orders have prompt 
attention. 

SUMMIT AVENUE 
GREENHOUSES 

HOWARD GARDNER, Proprietor 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Howio 



PETER A. KEMP 

Peter A. Kemp was born in Rock- 
ingham county, July, 1836; and died 
at his home in Leaksville, Nov. 6, 1911. 
He was the son of John and Elizabeth 
Kemp. He was a true and faithful 
soldier in the Confederate army in 
the struggle between the states in the 
60's. He was equally as valiant and 
faithful a soldier in the army of our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. He, 
like His Master, was a carpenter by 
trade, and his handiwork may be seen 
on many a home in this county. He 
did good and honest work. He was 
an excellent citizen, attending well to 
his own business, never known to 
speak evil or unkindly of any one. He 
spent his life in providing for his 
family and his church and bringing 
up his children to lives of honor and 
usefulness. His was in the best sense 
a successful life. He leaves the world 
richer and better by his having lived 
in it. Such men are a blessing to any 
community. His beloved wife and 
children and many friends live to 
mourn his departure, while he has 
entered into that rest that remains to 
the people of God. F. L. Townsend. 



TO CALDWELL 



In loving memory of Mrs. Caldwell 
Hoyle Brown, who died six years ago, 
in six months after her marriage to 
Mr. R. H. Blown, of Charleston. 

Mrs. Brown was daughter of Rev. 
M. H. Hoyle who died two years later. 
'Ere your hand slipped from mine 

dear heart, 
And your sweet lips no longer answer- 
ed my caiess, 
Nor smiled the love 
They had so oft expressed. 
'Twas then, in other days, glad other 
days, 

When life was full of love and joy and 
cheer, 

That I no notice took of season's 
change, 

For it was springtime in my heart 
always when you were near! 

But now before my wondering gaze 
In phantom fashion file the everchang- 
ing scenes 
The Master mind conceived. 
They haunt my dreams! 
My pulses thrill as summer rays reveal 
The rosebud perfected — its pearly pet- 
als wide, 

But soothed anon by tints of bronze 
and gold 

I rest in peace once more at winter's 
tide. 

But, love, with each return of spring 
The heartache I had hoped the passing 

year would east 

Grows more intense, 

The sense of loss more keen! 
In each new burst of song I hear you 

call, 

In violet depth I meet your glad, brave 
eyes, 

Your lips caress me with each passing 
breeze, 

In dumb despair I turn from cloudless 
skies. 

Dear Lord forgive me if I held 
Too dear this mortal tie. By power 
divine 
Use it to draw 
My burdened heart to thine! 
Through loneliness of heart give me 
to know 

The joy of leading those whose steps 

may stray 
Until, with soul uplifted, I shall pass 
From quiet rest to hail each new-born 

day! M. H. 




aVoid 
dangerous 
k medicines 



Just r . 
react the 
labels 



Read the Labels. The pure food and drug law 
was designed for the protection of all, but it only 
protects those who read labels. 

The law prevents false claims — on the labels — not 
in the advertising. The law makes the label tell if 
the medicine contains alcohol. Not so in the adver- 
tisement. 

Read the Label 

The law specifies a list of such drugs as are considered dangerous 
Unless prescribed by a physician, such as opium morphine, cocaine, 
acetanelid. canabis indica, chloral, arsenic, strychnine, etc., and 
makes the LABEL tell if any of them are contained in the medicine. 
The advertising does not have to. Therefore when buying medicine 

Read tll6 Label ^"he next t ' me y° u ars ' nc l' ne d to buy a tonic or 
— — — — — ^— a remedy for any of the Lis tliat come from 
impure, impoverished or acid blood, ark your druggist to let you read the 
label on a bottle of MILAM. This preparation has no rival. If you suspect 
any other preparation of being in its class, Read the Label. Look for a guar- 
antee of benefit. Look for ALCOHOL and other dangerous and habit 
forming ingredients. Any preparation can claim what we claim in their 
advertising: NONE CAN on their labels. 

READ THE LABELS! 





FROST PROOF CABBAGE PLANTS 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY CUSTOMERS 

FROM THE ORIGINAL CABBAGE PLANT GROWERS 



l EARLY JERSEY WA KEFIELD. . CHARLESTON LARGE TYPE. SUCCESSION. " AUGUSTA TRDCKEE, ~ BHOrVsTEM MED 
»UM,.2 WAKEFIELD. The Earliest A little liter FLAT DUTCH. 

Cabbage Grow. 2d Earliest Flat Head Variet;. than Sued 



TRADE MARK COPYRIGHTED 




Largest and Latest Cabbage. 



Established 1868. Paid in Capital Stock $30,000.00 4-«K 

Welgrewthe first FROST PROOF PLANTS in 18G8. Now have over twenty thousand satisfied 
customers, we have grown and sold more cabbage plants than all otliT persons In the Southern 
States combined. WHY? Because our plants must please or we send your money back. Order now; 
It is time to set these plants in your section to get extra early cabbage, and they are the ones 
that sell for the most money. 

We sow three tons cf Cabbage Seed per season 33&^w 

Fruit trees and ornamentals. Write for free catalog; containinrr valuable information about fruit 
and vegetable growing. Prices on Cabbage Plants:— By mail Postage Paid 45 cents pT 100 plants. 
By eTnress, buyrr paving ex"ress charges, which under special rate is verv low: 500 tor $1.00; 1,000 
to 4,000 Sl-SO per thousand; 5.000 to 9,000 $1.26 per thousand; 10,000 and over $1.(0 per thousand. 

Win. C. Geraty Co., Box 67, Yonges Island, S. C. 




Hardwood Mantels 

THAT PLEASE 

Grates and Tiles 

THAT HARMONIZE 



' I Get Our Catalogue. Free to 
those who are interested. . 



Odell Mantel Co., 

(Owned by OdeO Hardware Co.) 
GREENSBORO. - - ■ N. C 



SEE HERO 



Announcement 

Page Sixteen 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 18, 1912 



THE PRAYER LIST 

One of the highest privileges of the 
Christian life is the privilege of inter- 
cession for the unsaved. Every Chris- 
tian may be an intercessor and bear 
to the mercy seat in the arms of pray- 
er some unsaved friend every day. 
Have a prayer list. In a little memo- 
randum book write the names of those 
whom you are anxious to see saved. 
Spread these names before the Lord 
daily until your prayers are answered. 
One of the greatest Canstiau move- 
ments of modern times started with 
a prayer list carried in the vest pock- 
et of a commercial traveler, Mr. K 
R. Graves, traveling for a paper house 
in New York City. He secured pei- 
mission from a merchant to allow hib 
name to be entered on his prayer list. 
The merchant wrote his name in the 
traveler's book andf then proceeded 
to inform Mr. Graves that he had de- 
termined not to be a Christian, ana 
that he had taken too big a coutract 
if he expected to pray him into the 
kingdom. But the traveler simply 
said: "I confidently expect my pray- 
er to be answered." When they met 
again, the mrchaut had been convert- 
ed, and, amid tears of rejoicing, 
another man was checked off the list. 
The merchant's name was Samuel M. 
Sayford. Mr. Sayford became a Secre- 
tary in the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, and shortly afterwards met 
C. K. Ober, then a student at Williams 
College, and pushed him out into As- 
sociation work. Mr. Ober, in turn, 
found John R. Mott in Cornell Univer- 
sity and persuaded him to enter As- 
sociation work among students; and 
Mr. Mott, in the course of time, start- 
ed on his journey around the world or- 
ganizing the World's Christian Stu- 
dent Federation. — From "The Art of 
Soul-Winning," by J. W. Mayhood. 



A SEVEN-DAY RELIGION 

The profession of the first day of 
the week carried over and worked up 
into the other six is a test of one's 
sincerity. It is the way to accomplish 
something worth while for Jesus. 
"Business is business" is the world s 
cry. But religion is religion; integri- 
ty is integrity; honor is honor; and 
salvation through Jesus Christ is a 
fact, not a farce. A religion that is a 
misnomer at the counter is a farce at 
the communion table. True faith is 
elastic enough to stretch out to every 
rightful duty. But if there is any 
business upon which God's blessiug 
cannot be asked, it is time to let that 
business go forsomething in which 
God can become a partner. To God 
and to thine own self be true, and the 
days of the week will be so many 
panes in the window through which 
God's crystal light will come and make 
both heart and home beautiful. — Unit- 
ed Presbyterian. 



So rest and trust. Rest and be calm 
Rest and look back and take account 
of what is gone, and give thyself time 
to feel and measure better the love 
wherewith He hath loved thee, and 
the bonds and ties which ought to 
fasten thy heart to Him. If it be not 
Hi* pleasure to take away the clouds, 
or if He exercise thee with pain, yet 
abide His will and wait. Wait His 
will, wait what He may yet have to 
show thee. — Selected. 



STOPPED THOSE PAINS. 



Copper Hill, Va. — Mrs. Ida Conner, 
of this place, says, "For years, I had 
a pain in my right side, and I was 
very sick with womanly troubles. I 
tried different doctors but could get 
no relief. I had given up all hope 
of ever getting well. I took Cardui, 
and it relieved the pain in my side, 
and now I feel like a new person. It 
is a wonderful medicine." Many wo- 
men are completely worn-out and dis- 
couraged on account of some womanly 
trouble. Are you? Take Cardui, the 
woman's tonic. It record shows that 
it will help you. Why wait? Try it 
today. Ask your druggist about it. 





Thirty young "Heroes " are bringing a message of good cheer to the housewives of the South. 
Armed with samples of Hero, thirty boy " Heroes," in full uniform, are touring the South, in 
squads of four, town for town, and house for house, that the women of the South may know by 
actual test the delights of Hero Coffee and Chicory. 

Look Out for the " Boy in Gray." One of these little Heroes is scheduled 

to arrive at your home at a near date. Look out for him. See that you are presented with a 
sample of this delicious cup. He will also give you a little booklet telling you how to prepare to 
the best advantage, this most superb cup. 

COFFEE and 
CHICORY 

THE ROYAL BEVERAGE (100^ Goodness) 

Why Hero Is So Good: It is a scientific blend of the best grade of coffee with pure 
chicory. Chicory is itself, a delicious drink resembling fine cocoa in richness and flavor, and when 
compounded and roasted with fine coffee, by our own process, which brings out to their fullest advan- 
tage the exquisite flavor of the chicory and the rich aroma of the pure coffee, produces a drink 
that is in reality fit for Kings. 

Why Hero Is So Healthful : By our process, the tonic effects of the chicory — which 
tend to increase the appetite, promote digestion, and stimulate the livei — 
combine with the rich flavor and aroma of the coffee, resulting in a delicious 
beverage, not only appetizing, but very wholesome. 

A Clean, Pure Beverage ; Hero can be enjoyed with the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that it is absolutely pure and clean in every respect. Our 
modern sanitary methods and improved machinery insure the users of hero a 
clean, healthful drink, free from all impurities. 

Economical : Owing to the present low price of chicory, we are, even 
though using the highest grade coffee, able to offer the Hero brand of coffee 
and chicory at a lower price than is usual for good coffees. Owing to the rich- 
ness and strength of chicory, it takes less Hero to make a cup than of ordinary 

coffees. Lower in price* Goes further. 

A true idea of the deliciousness of Hero cannot be had unless you try it. 




1 , TH 



•POTTER SLOAN 'WOHIIM; 

!T £&S &SOASTERS OF £®f P* 6 ; 

NEW VORK.U.S A 



YOUR GROCER KEEPS IT. ASK HIM. 

Potter Sloan O'Donohue Company 



13 and 15 OLD SLIP 



NEW YORK CITY 




Antiseptic Powder 

When used right, makes you 
immune to bodily sull'eringby 
Immediately relieving offen- 
sive perspiration, chafing, 
itching, smarting of all kinds, 
especially infected and catar^ 
rhal conditions of the mucous 
membrane. Sun burn, prickly 
heat, perspiring and painful feet, sweaty orioi 
under tho arms, scratching, burns, cuts, 
wounds, ulcors, etc. 

Write for our valuable little booklet and a 
sample of Tyree's Powder free. Sold by all re- 
liable druggists, or direct by mail for twenty- 
3ve cents. 

'. S. TYREE Chemist, Washington. D. C 



' Treated. Quick relief. i*e- 
raovea swelling: and short 
breath in a few days, usually 
g-iveB entire relief 15 to 45 days and effects cure 
20 to 60 days. Write for trial treatment Free. 
| Dr. II. U. GREEN'S BO;iS, Box H, ATLANTA, QA. 




ISO'S 



IS THE NAN/IE 
OF THE BEST MEDICINE 

for COUGHS & COLDS 



Helms' Bahyoline 

An External Remedy for Old and Young 

For Pneumonia, Bronchitis, Croup, Colds, Whooping Cough, 
Soreness in Chest, and Cold in Head. Physicians 
prescribe it and get best results. 
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 25c for two-ounce jar 

J. D. HELMS, Manufacturing Chemist 

WINSTON, n. c. 




86 1-2 North Broad St. 



I EACH Ull I IUEDV Largest and oldest Millinery 
LCAlM nllLLIIlClil School in the South. All 
branches taught by competent instructors. School "ndorsed 
by South's Leading Milliners. 

ENTER TO PREPARE FOR SPRING POSITIONS 

Write for Full Information 

SAWTELL SCHOOL OF MILLINERY 

Opposite Piedmont Hotel, Atlanta, Ga. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as Information and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:30 a. m. No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special, through Pullman sleeping 
and observation cars New York to 
Birmingham and Richmond to Bir- 
mingham. Dining car service. 
12:48 a. m. No. 32 daily, the Southern's 
Southeastern Limited, Pullman 
sleeping cars from Jacksonville, 
Augusta and Aiken to New York. 
Dining car service. 
12:45 a. m. No. 112 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Pullman sleeping car 
from Winston-Salem to Raleigh 
open at 9:15 p. m. 

2:10 a. m. No. 30 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman sleeping and ob- 
servation cars from Birmingham 
and Asheville to New York and 
Birmingham to Richmond. Dining 
car service. 

2:26 a. m., No-. 31, The Southern's South- 
eastern Limited, Pullman sleeping 
cars from New York to Jackson- 
ville, Aiken and Augusta, and New 
York to Asheville. Day coaches. 
Dining car service. 

3:45 a. m. No. 45 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and 
points south. 

7:10 a. m. No. 8, daily local for Rich- 
mond, connecting at Danville with 
Norfolk train. 

7:20 a. m. N». 37 daily, New York 
Atlanta and New Orleans Limited, 
Pullman drawing room, sleeping 
cars and club and observation 
cars New York to New Orleans. 
Pullman sleeping car New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte and Macon. 
Pullman chair car Greensboro to 
Montgomery. Solid Pullman train. 
Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Durham 
and Raleigh. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11, dally local through 
to Atlanta, sleeping car from Rich- 
mond to Charlotte and Norfolk to 
Asheville. 

7:45 a. m. No. 154 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

1:15 a. m. No. 237 dally for Winston- 
Salem and dally except Sunday for 
North Wilkesboro. Pullman sleep- 
ing car Raleigh to Winston-Salem. 

S:80 a. m. No. 44 dally for Washington 
and points North. 

• :30 a. m. No. 144 dally for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro, handles Atlanta-Raleigh 
sleeping car. 
12:30 p. m. No. 21 dally for Asheville, 
Waynesville and local points, 
handles coaches and chair car 
through to Asheville and Waynes- 
ville. 

12:69 p. m. No. 130 daily for Sanford, 

Payettevllle and Wilmington. 
12:65 p. m. No. 7 dally for Charlotte and 
points south. 

1:40 p. m. No. 36 daily U. S. Mall for 
Washington, New York and points 
north, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars from Birmingham and New 
Orleans to New York and Pullman 
sleeping car Asheville to Richmond. 
Pullman chair car Greenville to 
Wshlngton, day coaches, dining 
ear service. 

2:20 p. m. No. 207 daily except Sunday 
for Winston -Salem, making con- 
nection for North Wilkesboro. 

2:39 p. mi. No. 151 dally except Sunday 
for Madison. 

3:39 p. m. No. 230 dally except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

8:86 p. m. No. 132 dally for Sanford. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 daily for Raleigh and 
Goldsboro. Handles chair car to 
Goldsboro. 

4:65 p. m. No. 131 daily for Mt. Airy. 

9:19 p. m. No. 35 daily U. S. Fast Mall for 
Atlanta and points south. Pullman 
sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans and Birmingham and sleep- 
ing car Richmond to Asheville 
which can be occupied until 7 
o'clock a. m. Pullman chair car 
Washington to Greenville, S. C, 
dining car service. 

6:35 p. m. No. 235 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta. 
Sleeping car and coaches to At- 
lanta. 

19:30 p. m. No. 38 daily New York Atlanta 
and New Orleans Limited. Pull- 
man sleeping cars and club and ob- 
servation cars New Orleans, Ma- 
con, Asheville and Charlotte to 
to New York and Pullman chair 
car Montgomery to Greensboro. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car 
service. 

19:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Winston-Sa- 
lem. 

19:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local for Rich- 
mond, handles Pullman sleeping 
cars for Richmond and Norfolk. 

E. H. COAPMAN, V. P. and G. M. 

Washington, D. C. 
S. H. HARD WICK, P. T. M., 

Washington, D. C. 
H. F. CARY, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, D. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
W. H. McGLAMERY, P. & T. A., 

Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCH E8, STERLING 8ILVER 
AND PLATED WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assort- 
ment of fine Pocket Books, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the oldest 
Leading Firm In the city. Everything Is 
guaranteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

LEADING JEWELER* 




Look for 

this 
Trade Mark 




It stands 
for 




HIGH GRADE FERTILIZER 



This Company has made a life-time study of plant 
foods, and what the different crops require. 

A. A. Quality Fertilizers 

BEST FOR ALL CROPS 

All plant food ia soluble and available, and of the highest agricultural 
value. Factories located throughout the North and West. Southern 
Factories and Sales Offices at 

NORFOLK, VA. COLUMBIA, S. C. SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. PENSACOLA, FLA. WILMINGTON, N. C. 

SAVANNAH, GA. MONTGOMERY, ALA. 



THE DEPTH OF OUR HAPPINESS 

God made us to be happy. This 
spirit runs through the life of many 
of us "who would not range ourselves 
with th ehermit or the Puritan. We 
are always afraid of good things. If 
God places a cup in our hand, brim- 
ming with happiness, we put it to our 
lips with a trembling grasp, and dread 
lest we may be having too much hap- 
piness. We never expect to have a 
day of perfect pleasure; we think It 
would be too good to hope for; there 
will always be some freckle in the 
lily, some thorn in the rose, some 
cloud in the sky. When we take oul 
joys, it is with foreboding. Wte tread 
the happy path with fear. Or, if we 
let ourselves go, and have one long, 
blessed, day; if we let ourselves go in- 
to a friendship, and drink and drink 
again; if we allow ourselves to delight 
in some avocation, accomplishment, 
or interest, we always fear that there 
will be a rebate; and that after some 
days or weeks have passed, God, who 
can not trust us with too much joy, 
will see to it that our life is plunged 
in gloom and sorrow to make an 
equivalent. 

If there be a burst of sunshine, we 
go about the world, saying: "You 
may depend upon it, we shall have to 
pay for htis." This spirit is perpetual- 
ly casting a shadow over our happiest 
days. The mother takes the little 
child in a perfect ecestasy to her bos- 
om, but as she looks upon its face 
she says to herself: "I must not be 
too happy, for fear God will take him 
away." The young man who recog- 
nizes his twin soul says to himself: 
"I must not be too happy, for suc^ 
happiness as this cannot last." This 
is the way so many of us go through 
this life — afraid to dring the cups of 
joy, which are ready in our hand. 

There is another phase of this same 
experience — we shut ourselves up with 
our sorrow. And yet the drakest day 
that ever came had some alleviation; 
the saddest hour that ever struck had 
something in it to make life possible; 
but too often we wrap the mantle of 
rief around our person, and although 
the sky sends down a glint of smiing, 
sunshine, although there are wafts 
to us of some beautiful burst of music, 
which should lift us up on its wing 
we shut ourselves up in our sorrow 
and say: "No, we are too down and 
dull today to be able to entertain and 
accept joy." How often the good love 
of God, therefore, though all around 
our path is sent away abashed, dis- 
appointed, and thwarted. Thus all 
our life is needlessly shadowed by 
constant prohibition. — Rev. F. B. Mey- 
er. 




It Never Flickers 



The long winter even- 
ings give a woman a splen- 
did chance for sewing or 
embroidery; but her eyes 
suffer from the strain unless 
she has a good light 

The Rayo is the best 
lamp made. 



It gives a strong, diffused light that is remarkably easy to the eyes. 
There is no glare to it ; no flicker. It lights up a whole room. 
The Rayo is an economical lamp, too. 

You get the most possible light-value (or the oil burned ; and the Rayo itself is a 
low-priced lamp. Yet it is a handsome lamp — an ornament to any room in the house. 

The Rayo Lamp is easily lighted without removing shade or chimney ; easy to 
clean and rewick. Made of solid brass, nickel-plated ; also in numerous other styles 
and finishes. 

Ask your dealer to show you his line of Rayo lamps ; or write (or descriptive circular 
to any agency of the 

Standard Oil Company 

(Incorporated) 



Bumper Crops,orthe Ordinary 

*MJ$^Kind, WHICH ? 




It's merely a questionof'using- good judgement in cultiva- 
tion and the right amount of the right kind of fertilizer. 



;sBS 
'■s ' ."■■?<?•'•' 



PLANTERS 
FERTILIZERS 



BRANDS 
ARE BEST 




And if used properly and liberally will vastly increase your crops 
and put money in your pocket. Recognized the country over as; 
the standaid of fertilizers. Planters Brands are scientifically com- 
pounded of the purest South Carolina Rock. Soluble Fish, Blood, 
Tankage, etc.. and high quality imported German Potash Salts. 
Richer in available phosphate than any other fertilizer on the 
maiket. There is a brand for every crop and soil condition. Kaen 
insures big results in its line. 



Savage. S. C. 

"I have used Planters Fertilizers 
on my farm, and have handled them 
through my mercantile business ever 
since you began making goods, and 
they have given satisfaction. 

The banner crops of this section 
have been made with vour fertil- 
izers." JOS. W. HOLLIDAY. 



Waterloo, S. C. 
"I have been buying Planters Fer- 
tilizer for several years. It gives me 
pleasure to state I like the mechan- 
ical condition and the good results 
gotten from its use better than any I 
have ever used." 

J. H. WHARTON. 



Look for our trade-mark. It's your guarantee of successful crops. 
Write for Free Copy of Our 1912 Almanac 

Planters Fertilizer & Phosphate Co. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



PLANTERS BRANDS FERTILIZERS 

GROW 

BLUE RIBBON PRIZE CORN. 



the Advocate Piano Club 



IMPORTANT SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE Advertising Manager of the Advocate takes great pleasure in announcing that he has effected arrangements witl 
Ludden & Bates, one of the oldest, largest and most reliable Piano Companies in the country, for the organization o 
the " Advocate Piano Club." Membership in the Club is open to every reader of the paper and you are invited b 
write at once for full information regarding what we believe to be the greatest opportunity to obtain a high-class piano, eve 
offered by a reliable house. 



THE OBJECTS OF THE CLUB 

1. By clubbing together to secure the lowest WHOLESALE prices 
for Club members. The Club saves you fully one-third the cost. Lud- 
den & Bates finance the Club and ship your piano at once. 

2. To obtain for its members the most ADVANTAGEOUS terms 
of easy monthly or quarterly payments. Almost any terms you want. 

3. To provide that in the event of your death, after $60 has been 
paid on your piano, all further payments are CANCELLED and your 
family is GIVEN A RECEIPT IN FULL. This is a splendid feature 
and removes every objection to the easy payment plan. 

4. To insure the best QUALITY of pianos guaranteed by an old 
and reliable house, thus avoiding the disappointment so often resulting 
from dealing with irresponsible firms. Club members also have the 
privilege of TESTING the piano thoroughly in their own homes before 
accepting it. 

5. To obtain for the Club members the best price for his old piano 
in exchange for a new one or for a new automatic player piano, that 
any member of the family can play. 

6. Every piano furnished to Club members is fully guaranteed and 
backed by the reputation of Ludden & Bates, one of the oldest, largest 
and most reliable Piano Companies in America. 




READ THESE LETTERS 



The College of Music, Hans Dreher, Director, 
Savannah, Ga., is probably the best known school 
of musical instruction in the South. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Savannah, Ga. 
Hans Dreher, Director. 

Ludden & Bates, 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Gentlemen : 

I take great pleasure to inform you that after a 
thorough investigation of your New Scale $400 Lud- 
den & Bates Upright Pianos, I found them to be 
instruments perfect in every respect. They have a 
fine tone, a beautiful singing quality and wonder- 
ful sustaining power. Too much praise cannot be 
bestowed on them, and I am sure they will meet 
with the greatest success wherever they are heard. 
Allow me to congratulate you upon this wonderful 
achievement and wishing you all success I am, be- 
lieve me, Very truly yours, 

HANS DREHER, 
Director. 



Ludden & Bates, Gaylesville, Ala. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Dear Sirs: 

Club Piano received in good order. We are well 
pleased with it. Better and nicer than Pianos sold 
here by agents for from $350 to $500. Our little 
town is pretty well stocked with pianos of different 
makes, and it is considered that we have the best 
piano in town. We thank you for your selections 
and prompt shipment. 

Yours, with best wishes, 

J. R. WILLIAMS. 



GIVEN RECEIPT FOR $125.00 

Ludden & Bates, Ecru, Miss. 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Gentlemen : 

We purchased one of your Club Pianos and are 
well pleased with it. Would not take anything for 
it. All who have heard it think it to be one of the 
grandest they ever heard. While we were paying 
for it my husband died. You gave us a life insur- 
ance clause. We were still owing $125 which was 
nicely settled, and our note was returned to us 
marked paid. 

We thank you very much for your kindness and 
prompt attention, which you have shown to us. 
Any one who wants the best piano made should 
buy one of these. They will be pleased with it and 
will be treated nicely, as we were. We appreciate 
your kindness very much. 

Yours truly, 
MRS. J. A. BRAMLETT. 



GETS RECEIPT IN FULL 

Ludden & Bates, Mountville, Ga. 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Gentlemen : 

After my contract for one of the Ludden & Bates 
Club pianos had been running about fourteen 
months, my husband died. The firm being advised 
of the fact, within a few weeks after, sent me a re- 
ceipt in full for balance due on piano. All of which 
goes to prove that they keep good faith with their 
patrons in regard to their free insurance agreement. 

I can heartily recommend them as being in every 
way reliable. 

Very truly, 

MRS. J. C. RUSSELL. 



Bradentown, Fla., February 17th, 1910. 
Ludden & Bates S. M. H., 

♦ Jacksonville, Fla. 

Gentlemen : 

I am the owner of Ludden & Bates Piano No. 11 
in Rosewood case, and I take pleasure in mentior 
ing that it has a good clear tone and a smooth eve: 
touch, notwithstanding it was bought of you 26 o 
27 years ago, during which time it has had constan 
service — considered by some an extraordinar 
amount of hard usage. 

This instrument has served two generations of ou 
immediate family in a most satisfactory way, an 
we have no idea of parting with it for any othe 
piano. Wishing you success, I am, 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) H. V. COARSEY. 



Ludden & Bates S. M. H., 
Gentlemen: 

I have tried the piano and found it as mentione' 
above. 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed) MISS ALICE BECK, 
Graduate of Barili School of Music, 
Atlanta, Gs 



We also have hundreds of other letters from sal 
isfled owners of Ludden & Bates Pianos. They ar 
contained in our booklet. 



WRITE FOR YOUR COPY OF CLUB BOOKLET TODA\ 

SEND your name on a postal card today and a free copy of the Club Booklet fully explaining the many advantages of th< 
Club will be sent you by return mail, also catalogue of Pianos. Address, 

£% ■ Advocate Piano Club Department 

LUClCien & DateS — Atlanta, Georgia = 



North Carolina 

Christian Advocate 

ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 



Thursday, January 25, 1912 













"TO EVERY MAN HIS WORK" 



|HE best way for a farmer to improve the farming of 
the country is to improve his own farming on his 
own farm. The teacher who would advance the 
cause of education and elevate the standard of 
intellectual life can do no better than to make his own 
school a model and train the young people under his own 
care in the best way. The father who is anxious to see an 
improvement in the homes of all the people can do more to 
bring about that happy result by making his own home an ideal 
home than he can in any other way. C| Let not the preacher 
imagine that he is called to give his time and strength to the 
work of the Lord in some general way, trying to spread him- 
self out over the whole field of Christian endeavor. Let him 
rather stick to his own job. There is a tendency in this day 
to seek to build up the Kingdom of God in the earth in some 
sort of wholesale way. Conventions and new departures in 
which a concerted attack is being made on the works of the 
devil in great centers, under trained leaders denominated special- 
ists, are the order of the day. The end of all these movements 
is too often merely a little instruction given by leaders to the 
rank and file of ministers and Sunday school workers as to the 
right way to do things. ^ Is not every minister a specialist? It 
is his specialty to save men and to lead his own congregation 
out to save men. Let him use the knowledge he has in this 
great work in his own field and the work will go on. So soon 
as we run after so-called specialists the Church will be shorn of 
its strength. Individual churches will become barren and 
unfruitful. Hands that should be busy will hang down 
helpless while the people wait for the specialist. It is not 
selfish for the preacher to stay by his own work. 

—New York Christian Advocate. 











The Guilford Range 



These ranges are manufactured for us under our special brand. 
We are exclusive dealers for this section. We have handled a 
great many carloads of these ranges, and believe, without question, 
that they contain the best value on the market. You do not need 
to pay an agent $65.00 or $75.00 for a Range, as a large propor- 
tion of the price goes for profit and selling expense, neither do 
you need to order from a catalogue house a range you have never 
seen. The long distance means delay and extra danger of damage 
in transportation. Later, when you need extra parts, it will be 
very inconvenient and expensive to obtain them, and your local 
merchant can sell you the Guilford Range at a price which will 
give you better value than you can obtain from a catalogue house. 
As a baker, the Guilford has no superior. You cannot buy a 
range which will give you better service, no matter how much you 
pay for it. Those, having city, or private water supply, will find 
it unexcelled as a water heater, owing to the excellent water front. 
It can be furnished with reservoir also, for use where there is no 
water pressure. 

If your dealer does not carry the Guilf6rd, write us for cata- 
logue, and give us his name. We shall be glad to send our hand- 
some stove catalogue, showing not only the Guilford Ranges, but 
stoves, and other useful household articles, to any interested, pro- 
vided this paper is mentioned. 



ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



IT IS THE DUTY OF EVERY MAN 



To invest his savings where they will be safe and yield satisfactory returns. 

We are in position to offer those desiring to invest small or large amounts, 
carefully selected bank stocks, or preferred stocks in industrial companies, paying 
seven to eight per cent, annual interest. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

SOUTHERN LIFE AND TRUST COMPANY 



A. W. McALISTER, President 

R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President 



A. M. SCALES, Vice-President and General Counsel 
S. A. KERR, Assistant Manager 



Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Give us your orders for Engraved Visiting Cards, Wedding 
Invitations, Announcements and Enclosure Cards. Our engrav- 
ers are the best in the South. When you buy engraved work 
from us you know you are getting the best at a moderate price 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



ggtgig Christian j\iiuocate 



ESTABLISHED 185S 


H. M. BLAIR. Editor 




Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South 


$1 .50 Per Annum in Advance 


Volume LV1I. 




GREENSBORO, N. G, JANUARY 25, 1912 


Number 4 






The New Old Bible 

REV. GEORGE D. HERMAN 






The Bible is the newest, the freshest, the young- 
est, the strongest and the most influential book in 
the world. Like the sun the 
Bible never grows old; like the 
sun the Bible is full of light. 

It has moulded the laws and 
customs of the civilization of 
earth's greatest nations. It is a 
tree of life whose fruits give 
healing and strength to the na- 
tions. No nation can ignore its 
moral principles and long escape 
the smothering pressure of greed, lust and selfish- 
ness. 

The Bible is an inspired Book; and it has inspir- 
ed our race with the highest ideals, social and mor- 
al, political and religious. It has fed and nourished 
the highest type of manhood and womanhood. It 
has touched and toned and tuned man's highest 
powers. It has met all the demands of our moral 
and spiritual nature. 

It is the most reasonable book ever written. It 
makes its appeal to our moral reason. It seeks to 
have us forsake the vil, and cleave always to that 
which is good. It urges us to seek the truth, to 
speak the truth, to love the truth, and to live tht 
truth, that we may attain the highest and largest 
freedom. It does not ignore man's temporal in- 
terests, but it does press upon our attention the 
supreme importance of things spiritual and eternal. 
It demands^that we seek first the kingdom of God. 

The Bible deals with the most important events 
in human history. It is the only book which gives 
a sane account of Creation, the fall of Man, the 
Flood, the Call of Abraham, the Exodus of Israel, 
and the Giving of the Law. It is the only book 
which tells of the Incarnation, the Ministry, the 
all-atoning Death, the triumphant Resurrection, the 
glorious Ascension, and the Intercession of the eter- 
nal Son of God. No other book tells of the coming 
and acts of the Holy Spirit, the inauguration of the 
Kingdom of God among men on earth, and of a 
general judgment at the end of the age. Its vision 
is, therefore, broad as humanity, deep as the guilt 
of sin, high as Heaven, and enduring as eternity. 

It is a progressive revelation. God gave the 
light as men were able to bear it. Much in the Old 
Testament was temporary in its very nature. The 
Bible reaches its full and perfect glory in the Per- 
son and Ministry of Christ. "He is the true light 
of the world." Whatever is found in the Old Tes- 
tament contrary to the teaching and spirit of Christ 
was only preparatory. "Bleeding bird and bleeding 
beast, hyssop branch and sprinkling priest" of the 
Old Testament all point to Calvary. The Jewish 
passover is no longer to be observed, because the 
Lamb of God that taketh away sin has come, and 
tasted death for every man. Our Lord's Sermon 
on the Mount is greater than the Ten Command- 
ments. "Come unto me, all ye that labor and are 
heavy laden, and I "will give you rest" is better 
than a list of hard names in Numbers. 

It is a book of human aspirations and inspirations, 
experiences and actions. It represents the best that 
men have felt and thought, said and done — the best 
of which humanity is capable. This means that the 
Bible was first written on human hearts in the con- 
flicts, failures, sorrows, temptations, and victories 
of real life. It is, therefore, a book of the living 
and not of the dead. It reveals what men of like 
passions with us thought and felt, said and did, un- 
der the life-giving touch of the Holy Spirit. It 
flashes on the canvass God-inspired men in their 
conflicts with doubt and fear and sin, but seeking 
with undying hope the Golden City beyond the 



glimmering stars, "where the wicked cease from 
troubling, and the weary are at rest." 

It is, therefore, the most human book in the 
world. It shows us human nature at its best and 
its worst. It lays bare the secret springs of de- 
sire, motive, impulse, volition, thought and action. 
It shows us what God-inspired men will do. It re- 
veals what devil-inspired men have done and will 
do. It throws on the canvass a Moses, who, turn- 
ing aside to see God at the flaming Bush, turned 
his back on the throne of Egypt to suffer affliction 
with the people of God, that he might inherit the 
true riches — riches of noble manhood on earth, 
and riches among the king-born sons of light in 
Heaven. But in opposition to this Moses we have 
a devil-inspired man — Pharoah, who shut his eyes 
to the light, hardened his heart, and refused to 
respond to the voice of God. It paints in vivid col- 
ors John the Baptist, rebuking a lust degraded 
prince, and losing his head for the sake of right 
and duty. But in contrast with this fearless John 
we see a cowardly politician— Pilate, who delivered 
the Son of God to be crucified, because he feared 
the rabble more than he feared God. Then we have 
that entrancing picture of the woman who anointed 
Jesus with the precious ointment, not counting the 
cost, because of the love she bore for Him. But 
in opposition to this good woman we have another 
devil-inspired man — Judas, earthly, sordid, greedy, 
covetous, Judas, who turned his back on Heaven, 
and sold the world's redeemer for a little cash. 

Another claim I make for this grand old book is, 
that it has inspired faith and hope and courage in 
fainting hearts as no other book has or can. It is, 
therefore, the best book for men in trouble. It is 
the best book for the defeated. It offers strength 
and victory to all who trust in God. It is the best 
book for the poor. It has plead the cause of the 
poor with divine eloquence. It teaches the poor 
how to be useful and happy in spite of the hard- 
ships of poverty. It is the best book for the rich. 
It tells where to deposit our treasures secure from 
rust and robbers. It is the best book for the young, 
pulsating with high hopes and ardent desires — it 
points the way to eternal success. It is the best 
book for the old, tottering on the brink of the grave 
■ — it floods the future with heavenly light, and sings 
with divine assurance — "All the boundless universe 
is life; there is no dead." It is the best book for 
sinners whose burden of guilt and sin has become 
intolerable — it cries with triumph: "Behold, the 
Lamb of God that taketh away sin." 

For these and other reasons it is the most popular 
book. It is loved and read and studied by more 
persons than any other book It is keenly appre- 
ciated by both the educated and uneducated. In 
its essential truths for personal salvation it is the 
easiest book understood. Even children can appre- 
ciate its luminous pages. On the human side of sal- 
vation its three great words are Believe, Love, Obey. 

It is the most democratic book. It condemns 
every form of slavery, oppression and unrighteous- 
ness. It makes men and nations free indeed. It 
proclaims liberty to the captives, and deliverance 
to all who are bound in fetters of iron. It opens 
the prison doors, and unlocks the gates of brass. It 
values man not for what he has by the uncertain 
chances of earthly fortune, but for what he is and 
may become as an immortal spirit, made in the di- 
vine image and redeemed by the blood of the Cross. 
It values man as the child of God and the heir of 
eternity. Its distinctions are moral and spiritual. 
Its inspirations and rewards are offered to all. 

Another claim is, that the Bible is the most con- 
sistent book ever written. To appreciate this state- 
ment, we must remember that the Bible was about 



fourteen hundred years in making, that it contains 
the productions of between 35 and 38 different writ- 
ers, and that among these were kings and peasants, 
philosophers and fishermen, Jews and Gentiles. But 
in every essential they utter the same great truths. 
They were surely inspired by the same spirit, for 
their doctrine of Man, of Sin, of God, and of Re- 
demption is the same. So marvelous is this fact 
that it cannot be ascribed to unaided human wis- 
dom — to the unaided wisdom of men who had no 
chance to consult each other, and who wrote under 
the most diverse conditions. This consistent unity 
of the Bible is the visible, abiding, miracle of the 
ages — so much so that only the spiritually blind re- 
fuse to see it. 

If men think the Bible is nothing -more than a hu- 
man production, let them give us another sermon 
as good as our Lord's Sermon on the Mount. If 
men honestly discount the inspiration of the Bible, 
let them give us another Gospel as good as that of 
St John's. What unaided human wisdom has done 
in the past it may do again. Let the men who un- 
derrate the divine elements in the Bible give us 
another epistle which moves in the high spiritual 
regions of Ephesians. If the Bible is nothing more 
than a human production, it ought to be easier to 
write a better one now than when Paul and John 
and Luke wrote. The world has more knowledge 
now than it had then. My answer to all who seem 
so anxious to get rid of an inspired Bible is this: 
Give us a better Bible than the one we have, or else 
forever hereafter be silent. 

As a book of moral precepts the Bible holds a 
high and easy supremacy. There is nothing in all 
the world of moral literature comparable to the 
Sermon on the Mount, the Ten Commandments, and 
Paul's exhortation "to speak the truth in love." Our 
race can never outgrow the moral principles of 
the Bible. These principles are such that they will 
hold in all worlds. As the expressions of the di- 
vine will they will be in force in Heaven. In any 
world moral creatures will be bound to "do unto 
others as they would have others do to them." As 
a Book of moral principles it spurns all compromise. 
If your right hand causes you to offend, you must 
cut it off. It will not degrade the standard, but it 
offers to empower men that they may measure up 
to its demands. It offers motives, ideals and in- 
fluences whereby the morally lame may leap as the 
hart, and run. with joy in the ways of righteousness. 

Now, it must be evident to those who have con- 
sidered the matter, that this high moral supremacy 
stamps the Bible with Divinity, because no man 
can originate moral truths higher than his own 
moral nature — and men do not try to invent moral 
standards which condemn their own conduct. In 
the very nature of the case, bad men could hot have 
written the Bible; and good men would not have 
professed to have had visions and revelations from 
God, unless it were a fact. But we are not left to 
human logic in this matter, for the old book has 
the bloom and fragrance of Heaven in its pages, 
and the men and women who read it to find God 
and truth and right will not long remain in doubt 
as to its heavenly inspiration. 

But it is as a book of religion that the Bible 
comes to its highest glory. Religion is greater than 
morality. Morality without religion to nourish it 
soon degenerates into lifeless fomality. As the 
Book of supernatural religion the Bible is the only 
universal Book. It meets all the demands of our 
moral and religious nature. It fits every age, race, 
and nation. It does for the Korean what it does 
for the American — it introduces him to the One 
True and ever-living God. It is the one divinely ap- 

CONTINDED ON PAGE FIVE, COLUMN THREE 



Page Two NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 25, 1912 



A CALL FOR REVIVAL WORK 

Last week we printed a communication from 
Rev. John W. Moore which was in leality a summon 
to all pastors of the Conference to prepare the way 
for the special revival movement contemplated in 
the resolution of our recent Conference at States- 
ville. This resolution, appointing a special com- 
mittee on evangelism, was embodied in the report 
of the Conference Committee, and we feel sure that 
no more important action was taken by that body. 
It touches the vital matter for which our holy call- 
ing as ministers exists, and toward which all our 
Church organization is supposed to be tending. 

A danger to which the minister is constantly 
exposed is that of delegating the prerogative of per- 
sonal effort at soul-saving to some one who may be 
willing to assume the work as a substitute. There 
is also danger of relying too much upon organiza- 
tion and losing time and opportunity while precious 
souls are dying. There is no organization that 
will equal enthusiastic pastoral leadership. The 
world has a listening, eager ear for the voice of 
one crying in its wilderness of sin and death, "pre- 
pare ye the way of the Lord." * * "Repent, for 
the kingdom of heaven is at hand." The time 
is at hand, the season is favorable, why put off the 
day of our spiritual advance and victory? 



AN ECHO FROM BISHOP HOSS 

In his address to the class for admission on trial 
Bishop Hoss gave some advice which it will be 
worth while for not only young preachers but all 
preachers, to carefully consider. 

"Yours will be a life of service," said the Bishop. 
"You will not get rich. Yet it is the happiest life 
on earth. The burden of the old preacher is to 
give up his loved employ. It is sad to drop out 
of the line and see the procession go by without 
you. The church expects you to be good men. 
This is the prime consideration. No man can 
preach the G-ospel until he first lives it. From 
the heart the message must come, if it is to touch 
the hearts of others. Faith in Christ is more than 
an historical belief. In the inmost heart there must 
be abiding assurance of His presence and love. 
There are no limits to the possibilities of the soul's 
growth, neither in time nor eternity. Christ comes 
down to our level to take us up to His presence. 
Nothing is too good to be believed by one who is 
good enough to be saved by divine grace. The 
church expects you to be effective ministers of 
the Gospel. Never sing, 'O to be nothing.' Make 
the best of yourselves. The day of the best preach- 
ers is not gone. Have a message and the path to 
the church will be filled. You must be diligent stu- 
dents. No man becomes a great preacher suddenly. 
Study the word of God until you master it, by 
verse, paragraph and by book. In these days there 
is so much study about the Bible and the Bible is 
too often neglected. The church not only expects 
you to be good and to preach but it expects you 
to be pastors. Among your people, in their homes 
and places of business, you get some of your best 
sermons. People will neyer forget you if you are 
with them in their hours of grief. And don't for- 
get the 'neglected rich,' and love the little chil- 
dren." 



THE WELL-BALANCED SERVICE 

If the service is disjointed it can not be balanced. 
There must be thorough articulation of the parts. 
Harmony of thought and of feeling must charac- 
terize every exercise of the hour and even the 
silences. 

There will be silences; for does not the rubric, 
"Let all our people kneel in silent prayer on en- 
tering the sanctuary," contemplate a holy quiet 
with which to begin? And is it not fitting that 
the congregation should remain in silent medita- 
tion a moment after receiving the benediction? 

In the well-balanced service one increasing pur- 
pose runs, and usually only one. The heart thought 
of the sermon contains it, but the elaboration of 
hymn and anthem, of prayer and Scripture reading 
must heighten its effect by preparing the heart for 
its reception. If it do not produce an anticlimax, 
and it is the very rarest occasion when it would, 
the mood and thought of the sermon should be 
translated into and epitomized by a prayer. Also 
a hymn that holds the essence of the hour's thought 
should be sung. By these means the holy purpose 
of the service will be better assimilated and de- 
fined in the spiritual life of the worshipper. 

If all this is true, should not both the minister 
and the congregation make thoughtful preparation 



for every part of the service? The congregation's 
attitude and spirit on entering the house of God 
may make or mar the worship. The selection of 
the hymns is a matter of prime importance. The 
Scripture lesson, so sadly fallen into disuse in the 
evening service, needs to be selected with great 
care. The prayer, the most difficult part of the 
worship to do successfully, needs to be the result 
of the minister's own deep prayer life and clear 
thinking and planning. The anthem or solo may 
harmonize with and intensify the worship's motif, 
but only when sung by consecrated lips with a 
lively appreciation of the hour's theme. * 



GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP OF TELEGRAPH 
LINES 

In his forthcoming report to Congress Postmast- 
er General Hitchcock will recommend that the gov- 
ernment acquire the telegraph lines of the United 
States and that they be operated as a part of the 
postal service. Mr. Hitchcock believes such an 
innovation would result in important economies 
and materially reduce telegraph rates. In approx- 
imately fifty countries of the world — notably Great 
Britain, France, Germany, Austria, Italy, Spain, 
Russia and Japan — government-controlled tele- 
graphs now are in successful and profitable opera- 
tion. In many of the countries they are operated 
in connection with the postal service. These tele- 
graphs serve an aggregate population of 90,000,000 
and in every instance they have been found to be 
of immense practical benefit to the people, in both 
promptitude and cost of the service. 

In speaking of the recommendation he would 
make to Congress, Mr. Hitchcock said: 

"My own view is that every reason for the trans- 
mission of mail under government control can be 
urged with equal force for the transmission of com- 
munications by telegraph. Because of the more 
extensive organization maintained by the postal 
service and the freedom from taxation and other 
charges to which private corporations are subject, 
the government undoubtedly could afford greater fa- 
cilities at lower rates, than are afforded by com- 
panies conducting the telegraph business. Next to 
the introduction of a general parcels post, for which 
there is a strong popular demand, the establish- 
ment of a government telegraph system offers, in 
my judgment, the best opportunity for the profit- 
able extension of the nation's postal service." 

The latest census figures available indicate that 
about 100,000 people are connected with the tele- 
graph companies of the United States. The ap- 
praised value of the systems proposed to be ac- 
quired would be purely conjectural, but it is said 
it would approximate $250,000,000. The experts 
who have figured on the proposition are of the opin- 
ion that existing telegraph rates could be reduced 
. at least one-third to the public and yet make the 
investment in, and operation of, the lines profitable 
to the government. 



THE BROTHERHOOD 

It is well that Brother W. L. Sherrill has writ- 
ten so explicitly concerning the Conference Broth- 
erhood and it is to be hoped that the members of 
the Conference and preachers on trial will take 
heed and become members for there are many 
whose names do not appear on the list. 

In 1893 the Brotherhood was organized at Char- 
lotte by the motion of the late Dr. Chrietzberg and 
the writer, then Assistant Secretary to the Confer- 
ence, wrote the first list and a large number be- 
came members. The first call amounted to more 
than $400.00 and that money was a God-send to 
the beneficiaries. It is likely that many members 
of our Conference carry old line insurance and 
may be satisfied but at the same time a few more 
hundred dollars in the Broth er'^od would not 
make the payments much heavier and think what 
a blessing it might, be to the loved ones of brothers 
who carry only the brotherhood insurance when it 
matures through a call to move up higher. 

We need to give our Brotherhood a boost and it 
is a right step for Doctor J. H. Weaver, the presi- 
dent, to appoint one man in each district to solicit 
members so that we may reach such a size as will 
be of great benefit to our loved ones when we are 
gone. Everybody knows that Rev. C. M. Pickens, 
Lenoir, N. C, is the secretary and treasurer and 
to him all checks and applications for membership 
may be sent. Let's pull the Brotherhood up the 
hill and make it much larger. 

Trojan. 



EDITORIAL NOTE AND COMMENT 

That was a beautiful little poem contributed for 
the Advocate by Rev. C. S. Kirkpatrick, of Canton, 
and printed in our issue of last week. We think 
we have discovered in Brother Kirkpatrick a gen- 
uine poet and have invited him to court the muses 
often for the benefit of Advocate readers. 

* * » * 

Our obligation rather than our right should claim 
our first consideration. We are so prone to con- 
tend for what we think is due us that we lose sigat 
of what we owe to others. Nearly all the social 
troubles of our time would be easily- settled if we 
would keep the unselfish spirit enthroned. 

* * * • 

A Washington press dispatch last week announc- 
ed the introduction in the House of Representatives 
by Mr. Berger, of Wisconsin, a bill proposing _a 
constitutional amendment providing for woman 
suffrage. Such a change is perhaps but a remote 
possibility, and not at all in harmony with public 
sentiment in the South. Nevertheless, the sen- 
timent is on the increase and presents a problem 
that future politicians are sure to have to deal with. 
: * ' ' . * * * * 

A contributor to one of our religious exchanges 
punctures the old bubble of complaint which some 
people always make about the pastor not visiting 
them. He says: 

More than a few church members are disposed 
to find fault with their pastor because he does not 
visit them more frequently. But when he comes, 
they make no use of him as a purveyor of spiritual 
food, or as a dispenser of spiritual medicine or as 
a competent counsellor as to duties arising under 
God's law. This almost universal lack of a spirit 
of inquiry on the part of individual Christians as 
to their personal life and work is one of the most 

amazing signs of the times. 

* * * * 

Much has been written recently about the high 
cost of living and many who have felt the pinch ap- 
preciate the fact that this is no fiction. Appropos 
to this a facetious writer in the Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal calls attention to the high cost of dying. Many 
of the living who have been called on to pay the 
last tribute to loved ones, especially in towns and 
cities, know what this means. The writer says: 

"It has occurred to me, while reading articles on 
the high cost of living that apparently no one has 
thought of the terribly high cost of dying. 

"Does it seem fair that a casket should cost so 
many times its intrinsic value, because of the press- 
ing need? Should liverymen charge double or 
treble for conveyances at such a time? Can not 
you undertake to show the actual robbery that ex- 
ists and thrives on the forced purchasing that often 
leaves a family almost bankrupt? That, too, at a 
time perhaps when its support is taken away. I 
hape tthat you may be able to start a crusade 
against such rank injustice. 

This will strike a responsive chord in the breasts 
of those who have to settle funeral bills in the 
towns. In fact the man of small means can hardly 
afford to die in the town if he is to be buried in 
respectable style." » * * * 

Referring to a recent interesting event in the 
history of Methodism in Lynn, Mass., the New York 
Christian Advocate says: 

Lynn Methodism was early Methodism so far 
as Massachusetts was concerned. Jesse Lee preach- 
ed there in December, 1790. First Church was 
soon organized, and in 1811 the Methodists at 
Wood End swarmed and built a second church. 
It cost $3,000 and had the luxury of a steeple, 
which no other meeting house in the commonwealth 
possessed. It was twenty years before it had a 
stove or any means of heating, and in 1859 it was 
burned. The present building, which is fifty years 
old, is being remodeled to meet the needs of the 
Sunday school founded in 1815, the first Methodist 
Sunday school in all New England, and now with 
an average attendance of 493, being the largest 
school in the Conference. On November 26th, St. 
Paul's celebrated its centennial, President Murlin 
delivering the sermon. At night the pastor, Rev. 
Donald H. Gerrish, read the sermon delivered by 
Eliljah Sabin at the dedication of the first edifice 
on Sunday, November, 27, 1811. Tne Rev. John H. 
Mansfield, who was pastor, 1857-9, when Lynn and 
the rest of the country was full of revival flame, 
delivered an address and greetings were read from 
many living men who have ministered to the con- 
gregation, including three at least of long and 
wide repute: Henry W. Warren, 1861-2; Daniel 
C. Knowles, 1872-75; Daniel Steele, 1875-78. 



January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



OBSERVATIONS 

The Puritans were among the earliest of the 
Anglo-Saxons to settle in America. They came ov- 
er in the May'ower and landed at Plymouth Rock, 
Dec. 21, 1620. They were a spiritually minded and 
devout people who desired freedom of conscience 
and religious liberty which was not allowed to them 
in the old country. 

The intolerant spirit among the religious sects 
in Europe, had long been paramount. The Cath- 
olics first persecuted the Protestants and then the 
Protestants turned on the Catholics, and finally 
when Protestantism became the State religion in 
England the Dissenters were shown no quarter and 
finally the Pilgrims braved the elements and made 
that long and perilous journey to the New World 
and settled on Cape Cod where they could without 
hindrance worship God according to the dictates 
of conscience. It is true that some of them later 
on forgot the Golden Rule and persecuted Roger 
Williams, but in the main the descendants have 
always stood for religious liberty and been a pos- 
itive force on this side of the water in support of 
the principle that men have right to choose in mat- 
ters religious as well as in matters political. 

It seems indeed strange that this right should 
have ever been questioned or hindered. In this 
liberty-loving age we cannot understand why men 
should ever persecute and butcher their brethren 
who dare to think in other grooves on matters of 
eternal interest. 

The founders of our government represented all 
shades of religious faith and demanded religious 
tolerance for each other and for fear this inalien- 
able right might sometime be abridged they wrote 
into the organic law, that church and State should 
be apart, thus giving all sects an even chance and 
every man the right to worship after his own fash- 
ion, with guaranteed protection in this right. 

Worship is a very serious and a very sacred 
matter and a distinctively individual matter. It 
has to do only with the individual soul and the 
God who made it, for it is holy communion between 
the creature and the Creator. No third party has 
any right to intrude at such a time or interfere with 
that communion. The law not ony shields the indi- 
vidual in the exercise of this right, but when a 
community of individuals congregate for worship 
they are protected against any disturbing influence 
from the outside. 

* * » • 

The danger in these times is from those "whose 
zeal is not according to knowledge" and who, tak- 
ing liberty for license, in the very name of religion, 
commit grievious and revolting crimes. All free- 
dom of liberty, religious or civil, is for the indi- 
vidual and a guarantee of all rights which do 
not infringe upon the privileges of others, for in 
fact, the liberty of one man stops just where the 
liberty of his neighbor starts. 

A religious zealot by the name of Sandford is 
the leader of a sect in Maine known as the "Holy 
Ghost and us." Sometime ago he put out to sea 
with a number of his followers without sufficient 
food for the voyage, as the law requires, with the 
result that several passengers starved to death. 
Sandford was convicted in the Federal Court and 
is now serving a ten year sentence in the Atlanta 
prison for the crime. His defense was that he was 
serving God according to the dictates of con- 
science and was guided by the Spirit in all he did. 
Well, he had the right under the law as an indivi- 
dual to jump into the sea or to starve to death, 
but he had no right to compromise the welfare of 
other men and their dependent families by taking 
them on a long sea voyage without sufficient food 
for the journey. The Federal law holds it to be a 
terrible crime for a ship master to put to sea with- 
out abundant food to meet the wants of the pas- 
sengers and it comes with poor grace for one thus 
guilty to plead the satute of religious freedom and 
the guidance of the Spirit of the Lord of truth when 
under a charge so grave. The people of Utah are 
protected in their worship just as other sects, but 
the law interferes when they attempt in the name 
of religion to practice polygamy because that prac- 
tice is an outrage on morality and tramples on the 
rights of sundry people. The worship is an indi- 
vidual matter while plurality of marriage is cer- 
tainly a "multitudinous" matter. One who believes 
in the faith cure has the right under the civil law, 
to abstain from the use of drugs, for that is a 
matter in which he alone is directly concerned but 
the "faith curist" has no moral or legal right to 
compromise the life of his child by neglecting to 
give it all necessary medical attention, and if he 



wilfully or under a delusion fails to do for the help- 
less one, that which experience and common sense 
require and as a result the child uies, he should 
either be prosecuted under the criminal law or 
placed in an asylum for the feeble minded. Paul 
in his earlier days with a good conscience perse- 
cuted the saints believing he was thus doing God 
service, and the poor deluded Hindoo woman with 
a good conscience casts her helpless babe into the 
river to be devoured by the fish, that sue may ap- 
pease the wrath of a heathen God. 

Religious liberty grants no such license, but pro- 
tects the innocent from the violence and the ignor- 
ance of misguided zealots. It is a great privilege 
to have freedom of thought and freedom of wor- 
ship, but every privilege has its attendant dangers. 
Let us remember that worship is an individual mat- 
ter and spiritual in its very nature, for it is com- 
munion with the Great Spirit and that every at- 
tempt to materialize and degrade it, is not prompt- 
ed by the Lord, but is of the devil. 

* * * • 

This is the nineteenth day of January and a State 
holiday by legislative enactment, ^because it is the 
anniversary of the birth of the distinguished chief- 
tain, Robert Edward Lee. He was born in 1807 
and died Oct. 12, 1870. The state would have its 
business suspended today in his memory, that the 
people may stop and think of the life he lived, and 
of the noble record he bequeathed to mankind. All 
the years since he died have helped to bring out 
in bolder relief his illustrious career which grows 
more and more an inspiration to ambitious youth 
and the admration of all men. An eminent British 
soldier has said he was the greatest military ge- 
nius the English speaking race had produced since 
Marlborough, and now that the bitterness of the 
Civil strife has abated he is never referred to in 
any part of our own land except in words of praise 
and eulogy. 

He was a general that had not only the genius of 
command and leadership but a wealth of mind and 
heart which attracted the highest admiration and 
the genuine warm love of every soldier who fought 
in the ranks. He was a patriot who loved his 
country and was willing to be offered as a sacrifice 
upon its altar. 

He was a gentleman, chivalrous by nature and 
guided by the loftiest standards of honor, but great- 
er than any or all of these he was a devout and 
humble disciple of Jesus Christ and threin did his 
character stand forth blameless and without spot. 
He was indeed a great man whose splendid genius 
was seen on many a victorious battlefield, but when 
the war was over and his cause was lost, his great- 
ness stood out far more conspicuously as he main- 
tained an even dignity in the midst of humiliation 
and poverty. This was the trial of faith and the 
test of character. 

Great as he was in the midst of victory he was 
greater still in the midst of defeat. Shortly after 
the war the representative of a great insurance 
corporation offered him $50,000.00 salary if he would 
accept the presidency of the company. He replied 
that he was not familiar with the business and 
could not render service sufficient to earn that sal- 
ary. The officer then said, "that makes no differ- 
ence for we don't want you to do any work; what 
we wish is the use of your name." Then came 
his famous reply: "If my name is worth $50,000.00 
a year I ought to take very great care of it." And 
that closed the matter— all kinds of flattering offers 
were made for the use of his name but he turned 
from them all and accepted the presidency of Wash- 
ington College (now Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity) at the small salary of $1500.00 a year and 
there assumed the duty of teaching Southern boys 
to be noble men. He never sold his birthright for 
a mess of pottage. He never compromised his good 
name for commercial benefits nor loaned it to any 
enterprise where it might be used to further selfish 
ends. 

* * » * 

In his college work he was painstaking and im- 
pressed upon the students the great importance of 
faithfulness to duty and respect for authority. He 
introduced the honor system and demanded that 
every student live up to a high standard of right. 
He abolished the old custom of long Christmas 
vacations and allowed only Christmas day as a hol- 
iday. ' This stirred the student body almost to the 
point of rebellion and one of the faculty, fearing 
they might all go home urged General Lee to aban- 
don the new rule. He very calmly but positively 
replied that he would close the college and put the 
key in his pocket before he would surrender to the 



unreasonable demands of thoughtless school boys. 
And then every boy on the campus backed down 
and submitted to the rule without a word. 

From these two incidents which occurred late in 
the life of the great soldier we may learn two very 
useful lessons: 

1. Put high value on your good name and never 
sell it at any price, for a good name is rather to be 
chosen than great riches. 

The man charged with the spirit of modern com- 
mercialism may think it very strange and certainly 
very poor business judgment in General Lee to 
turn down the $50,000.00 offer and accept instead 
$1500.00 a year in a poor little college, but General 
Lee was right. He made no mistake but on the 
contrary chose wisely. 

2. Put high value on discipline and always re- 
spect law. 

He had been trained and disciplined as a soldier. 
He had learned to obey before he learned to com- 
mand. 

He was a wise man, sure of his ground and could 
not be driven from it. 

If he had given way to the students he would 
have been brought into contempt and also taught 
them a lesson in lawlessness. His firmness brought 
them to their senses and to respect even more high- 
ly the great man who was thair teacher. 

* * » » 

The name of Lee is written in brilliant letters 
alongside the great captains who 'have fought the 
world's battles, and his fame will grow steadily 
with the centuries, because his lofty standard of 
duty, of courage and of piety will command ad- 
miration and respect so long as virtue and valor 
are held in regard by mankind. W. L. S. 



THE ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

The pastors' lists for sample copies have been 
coming in rapidly, but there are many yet behind. 
Only one half of the Presiding Elders have fur- 
nished us with the official lists and post offices. 

We are sending out thousands of samples at 
great expense. If pastors and official members do 
not follow up this with a diligent canvass to se- 
cure subscribers it will be a heavy loss to us. It 
would be better not to send lists at all than to 
send them and fail to make any canvass. It is 
a poor fisherman that will have the hole baited for 
weeks and then not go fishing. \V!e beg pastors 
and others interested in the circulation of the Ad- 
vocate to send in lists of names that they feel 
ought to be interested in the Church paper and 
then follow up with an earnest effort to secure 
them as subscribers. 



SPIRITUAL TEST QUESTIONS 

Do you call to mind the sins of your youth and 
riper years with shame and sorrow? It is a good 
sign of your present spiritual condition. But do 
you joke about them; do you dwell upon some of 
them with pleasure? Do you place yourself again 
in the same circumstances, and feel that you 
would do so again? Do you remember some pow- 
erful appeal to passion and appetite, which at the 
time you resisted, and almost wish that you had 
yielded? Have you temptations now with which 
you parley, and which you deny more from policy 
than from principle? Would you yield to these 
temptations if you could do so without exposure 
and temporal loss? Is it a care for your reputation 
that rescues you from actual sin? Then you have 
never been regenerated, or you have measurably 
or wholly fallen from grace. Examine yourself 
whether you be in the faith. Hasten to place your- 
self by grace, in such a condition that the remem- 
brance of your sins will be grievous to you, and 
that you will nate sin with a perfect hatred. 

R. N. Price. 



The editor of the Advocate, in behalf of thou- 
sands of readers, thanks Dr. Price for this contri- 
bution. We pray that these searching questions 
may be the means of bringing many to repentance. 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 

Rev. M. H. Vestal informs us that Rev. W. M. 
Bagby has been appointed to supply the Elk Park 
Circuit and that Rev. S. W. Brown takes the place 
of Rev. W. M. Johnson on the Laurel Springs 
Charge, and Rev. G. M. Daniel, of the North Caro- 
lina Conference, goes to the Watauga Circuit in 
place of Rev. T. E. Weaver, who has gone to Flori- 
da. He writes that all the preachers of the dis- 
trict are at their posts and give promise of faithful 
and effective work. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



NOW AND THEN 

Occasional Notions as They Occur ;; 

By Trojan 

Opportunity says: 

"They do me wrong who say I come no more, 
Wfhen once I knock and fail to find you in; 
For every morn I stand outside your door, 
And bid you wake, to rise, to fight and win." 

From a certain viewpoint it might appear that 
the one who had passed a sleepless night and was 
wide awake when the morning dawned and with 
little strength to rise from his bed, could see but 
little opportunity for him to fight and win. Yet I 
hold that there is opportunity for every one in this 
condition to make good by doing his very best and 
showing to his friends and loved ones that even 
in weakness he could be made strong by the grace 
of God. Those who are on the Lord's side have 
the promise of strenlgth to the last day and they 
win. 

* * * * 

Once upon a time an old Scotchman was going 
to the mill with his bag of grist thrown across the 
horse's back when it became unbalanced and slipp- 
ed to the ground. The old man was in a quandary 
for he was not strong enough to put the bag again 
on the horse. A Scotch nobleman came by and 
noticing the trouble quickly dismounted and pick- 
ing up the sack easily, replaced it and also assisted 
the old man to his position. He was a nobleman 
by greater right than monarchy could confer. "And 
may it please your Lordship," said the old man, 
"how can I ever pay you for the kindness?" "Easy 
enough, John," said the nobleman, "as you pass on 
through life and find some one needing assistance 
as I found you, give him a lift and that will be 
thanking me." 

* * * * 

I was barely able to travel on account of physi- 
cal weakness but had a trip to make and was wait- 
ing at the station for a train. In approaching the 
car, on the platform was a friend who observing 
my rather halting movements reached down his 
hand and said: "Glad to see you Mr. Trojan, can 1 
assist you in any way?" "Yes, Sir," was my reply, 
"You may hold on to my hand and help me up the 
steps." He did so and after taking my seat in the 
car it occurred to me how easy it is in life to do 
some kindly deed to the weak and disappointed. 
A few weeks after the incident related my friend 
wrote me that the reply: "You may help me up 
the steps," had put him to thinking if he was doing- 
enough in that direction. 

* * * * 

It was not my intention in response to my friend's 
courteous inquiry to preach him a sermon on his 
duty to the weak, for he appeared to be alive to 
that, but after all, we realize that there are so 
many on the way who need assistance and many 
a time an opportunity to help some one up the 
steps we fail to see because of interest in other 
matters of less import. A little boy three years 
of age, whose parents have a room in my house, 
came into my study this morning and said: "How 
do you feel gan'pa?" I'm not his grandfather but 
he honors me with the title. But the little fellow's 
kindly interest got next to me and did me good. 
The little child is often a great teacher. 

* * * * 

When Peter and John were going up to the 
temple for the prayer meeting they had time to 
stop and have a talk with the lame man at the gate 
of the temple. He was there to solicit alms but 
the two disciples had no money to give but they 
preached him Christ as his Savior and then took 
him by the right hand and lifted him up and the 
man went leaping and praising God. Religion as 
taught by Christ is intensely practical as well as 
spiritual and the practical part should not be 
eliminated from our regular religious exercises. 

* * * * 

There is no use talking about it there is much 
in giving a hand as we go on life's journey. It is 
not a sermon to preachers I am trying to make in 
these remarks for they are certainly up on the doc- 
sometimes to speak of things though we know 
trine of "giving a hand," but it is not out of order 
them. In my service at Riverside, in Asheville, it 



was always a habit of mine to get to the front 
door and give a hand shake and "God bless you 
on the way" to every one coming out. It was 
done for the purpose of the good that was felt both 
by the preacher and his congregation. These things 
have never been forgotten and I dream of them 
yet and it does me good to preach even when 
asleep. 

* * * * 

Some one rang the door bell yesterday and I 
heard my wife say: "He is in his room and will 
be' glad to see you." My visitor was Rev. T. W. 
Mansfield and it was a great pleasure to chat 
with him about the old days of the Asheville dis- 
trict. He is still selling books and doing good. 
Twenty years ago he was preacher on the Hot 
Springs Circuit and in one year sold $300.00 worth 
of books. When he fails in this relation there will 
surely be something wrong with the part of the 
world he travels. Mansfield is a good man and 
in leaving said he would come again some day. 
"Take pot luck and ask no questions." There is 
not a big pot here but what we have won't make 
him sick. 

***** 

When a preacher gets the idea that his pay is 
entirely inadequate for his needs and the idea be- 
comes so dominant as to interfere with his work 
he needs to give up the work and go into some- 
thing else Where he can make more. But the preach- 
er who knew he was called to the ministry, will find 
later, even with more money from secular employ- 
ment, that he made a mistake in letting the money 
idea get control. In' the first place a preacher, 
with a salary of $600 to $900 per year with a 
house free, will have a better and happier time 
than on the road with a salary of $1200 or $1500 
with house rent to pay. The preacher is entitled 
to his pay, no question of that, but when he quits 
for more money, going into something else, he has 
my sympathy. He will not be satisfied. 

Look over the list of superannuates, members of 
the Conference, some of whom preached for many 
years and some for a few years, only, but not one 
on this list today if he were effective would fail 
to shout for joy if sent to a mountain circuit. Now 
that is my notion. In 1903 my general health im- 
proved and I went on the road to sell flour and in 
this work made good and received a nice salary 
from the beginning. But two years and six months 
put me back as it became apparent that my phy- 
sical condition could not meet the requirements 
of road travel. It doesn't make any difference 
who the preacher is he will never know fully what 
a great position he holds until he is called to get 
on the shelf. 

* * * * • 

Talking about revivals. I hope the one to be 
held in West Market at Greensboro will be a big 
one and with glorious results. But I started out 
to tell of one at Peachtree. This was at the time 
indicated an appointment on the Murphy Circuit. 
My first visit to this place is well remembered. 
The Methodists had no church building but used 
the public school house. The Baptist church im- 
mediately opposite was a roomy, new and comfort- 
able building. I was in the old school house get- 
ting off my leggings and opening up the saddle 
pockets when a committee from the Baptist church 
came over and invited me to preach in their house. 
The invitation was accepted and the courtesy ex- 
tended the entire two years of my work on that 
circuit. I visited my own people in that vicinity 
and many of the Baptist families and found they 
had as good turnip greens, chicken and so forth as 
did the Methodists and that they were real folks 
too. The revival started at Peachtree. It wasn't 
the preaching, for most of the time the preacher 
did not have the opportunity to preach. Everybody 
just seemed to have the impression that the re- 
vival was a sure thing, and it was, and doubtless 
fruits of it grow to this day. One night after the 
preacher had taken his place in the stand and 
was reading a portion of the Scripture, a handsome, 
well grown young man, in the congregation, known 
by every one as wild, but of generous qualities, 
came walking up the aisle with arms extended and 
when directly in front of the pulpit said: "Mr. 
Troy, for God's sake pray for me; and pray for me 
now." He had interrupted me in the reading of 
the lesson but, that was pardonable under the cir- 
custances. Closing the book I said, please sing: 
"There is a fountain filled with blood," and I then 
extended an invitation for all the unconverted and 



interested to come and they came. No doubt about 
that. It was a great meeting and some of the 
very best people in that section joined either our 
church or the Baptist as the result. If there had 
been any ice before the young man hereinbefore 
mentioned took the great step it was melted when 
he called to God to save him. Emotion, excitement, 
say folks who do not think much of the revival 
as it has been seen so many times. But when a 
man realizes his lost condition in living totally 
regardless of the claims of our heavenly Father 
he has cause to become excited and emotional, es- 
pecially if he be built that way. There was a young 
man in this meeting who was not of the emotional 
type but high-toned and moral. He kept the store 
and lived nearby where he was always glad to 
entertain the preacher and the entertainment was 
of the best. He had a wife who was a model 
housekeeper and it was mighty good fare she dis- 
pensed. This man, deliberately, without show of 
emotion, came one night and kneeilng at the bench 
stayed there until he realized the peace of God. It 
was not long before this realization. From boy- 
hood, in the home of his father and mother, who 
lived at Murphy, he was not far at any time from 
the Kingdom of God. But with this godly example 
before him he had not taken the decisive step be- 
fore the Peachtree revival. He didn't cut up as did 
the other young man for he was not of the emo- 
tional character. The latter when he received the 
blessing took possession of the entire house, and 
some of the outside, but the former stood still and 
with a smile on his face spoke of his new-found 
joy. Here is another man who has been attending 
a meeting. He is a sinner and at first not much 
interested but goes early so as to get a back seat. 
The Gospel, however, reaches him there and he is 
converted. He is up at the front now and mingles 
with the saved. Once in a while he shouts. Why 
not? He has cause. And if .he has any shout in 
him now is the time. 

* * * * 

GOOD NEWS 

"As cold water to a thirsty soul, so is good 
news from a far country. Pro. 25:25. We 
always want the news. "What's the news?" we 
say when meeting our friends on the way. And it 
is good news we delight to hear and especially so 
if somebody we care for lives far from us. It is 
like cold water when we are thirsty and there 
is nothing more delightful to the taste than that. 
When really thirsty and taking a cold drink of 
pure water we think of the Indian, who in taking 
his first iced lemonade, said: "So good; so good; 
wish my neck was a mile long and I had tasters 
all the way down." 

Well, several weeks ago, when I read the letter 
in the Advocate from Brother H. L. Atkins writ- 
ten in his far away home it did me a lot of good 
and I thought of Proverbs 25:25. It was good 
news. True he indicates his lack of physical 
strength but the fact that he was able to write 
so delightful a letter made it good news, indeed. 
My hand stretches to him as it were with a hearty 
God bless you in the great fight he is making for 
restoration to health. Sometimes it must be good 
for us to be afflicted to properly realize that God 
does not forget us. The great danger is not that 
he forgets us, but that we so often forget Him: 
"Beware that thou forget not the Lord thy God." 

I met Brother Atkins at Concord in 1890 and he, 
Turrentine, Falls, Mallonee and myself had com- 
pleted the studies in the class of the second year 
and after examinations were admitted into full 
connection and received the charge and ordination 
from Bishop Keener. Of these five three are still 
effective, while Brother Atkins and myself are 
on the waiting list. And this fact makes him rath- 
er close to me. It has been my good fortune to be 
much with him in visits to Asheville and Salisbury 
while he was pastor at these places and the at- 
tention and brotherly kindness shown me has 
made him a brother indeed. In our examination 
at Concord Brother Finlayson examined us on Wes- 
ley's sermons. I think at that time Finlayson was 
at Shelby. He was in bad physical condition at 
Concord but he certainly knew how to handle 
Wesley's sermons. He took me up on the "Regen- 
eration" sermon and because I answered his ques- 
tions, with a twinkle in his eye, said: "I guess 
you have been preaching that sermon." I had 
read it over a great many times and some of it 
naturally stuck. We hope to hear again from 
Brother Atkins and he knows we will always be 
glad to read his helpful messages and that his in- 
terest in the old home is heartily appreciated by 
his brethren. 



January 25, 1912 NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE P*S« Five 



A WORKER'S SONG 

Rev. J. M. Downum 

Some word or act for Thee, 

By which some heart is stirerd 

To listen to Thy word; 
Some word or act for Thee, 

By which a soul is won, 

And thus Thy will is done; 
Some word or act for Thee! 

Some soul, Oh Lord, for Thee! 

By word or act or prayer, 

By song or treasure rare; 
Some soul, some soul for Thee! 

Through noble feelings grand, 

By work of heart or hand, 
Some soul, some soul for Thee! 

Much thought and love for Thee, 

Through which my soul shall yearn 

Thy holy will to learn! 
Much thought and love for Thee, 

In dark and troublous day, 

When hard and steep the way, 

Much thought and love for Thee! 

(Some soul, etc.) 

Some song or prayer for Thee, 

To lure the wayward heart 

From evil paths apart! 
Some song or prayer for Thee, 

To cheer the fainting soul 

To onward press to goal — 
Some song or prayer for Thee! 

(Some soul, etc.) 

Boone, N. C. 

FROM OLD VIRGINIA 

J. M. Rowland 
I was struck with your editorial on "multiplying 
Church Machinery." I was interested recently in 
the wonderful display of every kind of machinery 
known in the South as demonstrated at the Virginia 
State Fair, but I thought the church could show a 
bigger variety of machines. The Baptists have a 
mass of machinery they are trying to run by water 
power, and the Methodists have still more they are 
trying to run by steam. We have everything from 
the threshing machine of the General Conference 
to the sausage mill of the official board not to men- 
tion an ever increasing number of interdenomina- 
tional vacuum cleaners, patent churns, cotton pick- 
ers, shoe shiners, steam rollers, rock crushers, 
street sprinklers, grass radiators, and percolators, 
we are expected to furnish a liberal amount of 
steam to run. 

Wlhen a modern preacher begins his pastorate of 
a church he sees a great mass of machines he is 
expected to engineer, besides firing to produce the 
power to run them. On to the main building con- 
taining the Gospel machine, many adjuncts and ad- 
ditions have been built. The Sunday School, Wo- 
man's Home Mission Society, Ladies' Aid Society, 
Sunday School Teachers' Meeting, Men's Meetings, 
Epworth League, Junior League, Young People's 
Missionary Society, Children's Missionary Society, 
the Choir, the Official Board, Prayer Meeting, and 
others are under the main roof, all having bands 
running to the main big wheel. The preacher 
must fire up steam and engineer all these. They 
are machines of the industrial church. 

Over there a little farther is another group of 
machines with bands running to the pulpit and all 
their representatives hollering to the preacher for 
more steam. Here is a partial list of those ma- 
chines: Laymen's Missionary Movement, Men and 
Religion Forward Movement, Orphanages, City- 
Mission, Anti-Saloon League, W. C. T. U., L. L. A., 
Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., Christian Alliance, Home 
Missions, Church Extension, Foreign Mission Spe- 
cials, Superannuate Endowment, Church Extension, 
Birth Day Offering, Methodist Training School, 
Children's Home Society, Federated Bible Classes, 
Wesley Brotherhood Class, Education, American 
Bible Society, Associated Charities, Ex-Prisoners' 
Aid Society, Sunday League of America, Child La- 
bor Committee. A large number of these machines 
want to take collections at the Sunday services. 
The mails to the preachers' offices are flooded with 
circulars giving full instructions for running each 
machine. There are many postals and stamped 
envelopes asking for information, such as how 
much steam you can carry without blowing out a 
cylinder-head, and asking for a list of your leading 
members who have some plunks to spare. Also you 
are asked to furnish lists of all who have children 
to go to school and all who might be induced to 



buy aprons. You also receive numerous lectures 
from various points on the map for your failures 
to measure up in the past, with orders as to what 
will be expected of you in the future. This snow 
storm must have blocked traffic, I didn't get any 
such mail today. 

In addition to these small duties a preacher must 
preach, hold prayer meeting, raise his church debt 
and running expenses, visit the sick, receive and 
return social visits, settle difficulties, listen to 
countless ills of human flesh, bury the dead, bear 
the burdens of his people and lead them to the 
Lord. In addition to all this the preacher's office is 
a clearing house for all the bums, schemers, 
skinners, sharpers and wolves who would prey up- 
on his flock. And yet some folks say a preacher 
has an easy job. Such people need operating on 
for ignorance. 

Now mind you I am not belittling any of this ma- 
chinery. We can't run the twentieth century with- 
out machinery, and improved up-to-date machinery. 
The spinning wheel and the distaff are gone, the 
knitting needles are gone, the ox cart and the old 
dash churn are most gone. Farmers, machinists, 
business men are after up-to-date machinery. The 
church of God must do likewise. But what I am 
afraid of is my church will be like the farmer who 
bought a farm and every kind of machine he could 
hear of and then found out to his sorrow he had 
no money left to buy seed and power. Nor do I 
want my church to be like Lincoln's Ohio River 
steamboat. It was ten feet long and its whistle 
was twelve feet long. Every time it blew its 
whistle it stopped. It might be well for some en- 
thusiastic specialists who think their claims the 
most important of all to remember how many like 
claims face a present-day preacher. He needs 
sympathy. 

The sad fact is in keeping up with the procession 
we haven't time to keep long at the cross. And 
with all of our boasted machinery if the day dawns 
whpn the spirit is not in it's wheels we are doomed. 

But I took my pen to say a word about two men 
we have lately sent to you. Dr. James Cannon, of 
the Southern Assembly and Major J. C. Hemphill, 
of the Charlotte Observer. Not that they are two 
of a kind. Over here they were leaders of the 
temperance and liquor forces, respectively. We 
don't care what you do with Hpmphill so you don't 
let him come back, but we want you to stand by 
Cannon. While in the offices of certain newspapers 
and the liquor headquarters lie has still other 
names, he has long contended successfully with 
the world, the flesh and the newspapers. No man 
in Virginia has done more for his state in educa- 
tion, temperance and general advancement. He has 
a morbid mania for succeeding. He is a cannon, 
but not related to Joe Cannon in name or nature. 
The General Conference has placed him at the 
head of the Southern Assembly at Waynesville. 
He is one man it will be hard to get along without 
in Virginia, but we believe a greater work and a 
wider field is before him where he is. We expect 
to see Waynesville eclipse all Northern Assembly 
grounds before many years. 

The Virginia Conference very strongly endorsed 
him and his undertaking at its last meeting. 



CHURCH EXTENSION AID 

The annual meeting of the Board of Church Ex- 
tension will be held late in April or early in May. 
This is the meeting where applications for aid are 
considered. That those interested may know ex- 
actly how to proceed, the following is submitted: 

1st. All applications must be made upon the 
printed form provided by the Board for that pur- 
pose. These application blanks may be had with- 
out cost from this office. 

2nd. After the application has been properly pre- 
pared, it should be sent at once to the Secretary of 
the Annual Conference Board as the following 
rule provides: 

"Every application for consideration at the hands 
of the General Board must first receive the approv- 
al of the Board of Church Extension of the Confer- 
ence from which it comes, and said approval must 
be given at the regular meeting of said Board or 
of its Executive Committee held in the month of 
March, Said Boards or Committees shall consider 
all the applications from their respective Confer- 
ences and forward such as they approve so as to 
reach the Board's office at Louisville, Ky., by April 
1st of each year. Each application so approved 
must have the action of the Conference Board writ- 
ten therein, certified by the President and Secre- 



tary, and all the applications from a given Confer- 
ence must be, by the Conference Board, graded and 
marked in the order of their relative importance, 
and the Secretary is hereby directed not to put 
on the Calendar any application not in conformity 
with this rule." 

3rd. The mid-year meetings of the Conference 
Boards or their Executive Committees are held in 
March. Do not fail to have your application in the 
hands of Conference Board Secretary by March 1st. 

4th. Personal representation in the interest of 
applications by other than members of the Board 
is not permitted, as the following rule declares: 

"The Board has not time to hear oral arguments 
or statements in behalf of applicants, and while 
considering applications for aid its doors are closed. 
Representations other than those contained in the 
application can be made in writing or through 
members of the Board. A different rule would be 
obviously unfair to applicants too far away or too 
poor to send representatives." 

5th. The demands upon the Board have been so 
numerous and so urgent that over-appropriation has 
resulted. The fiscal year will close with many un- 
paid grants on the book which must be taken care 
of out of next year's receipts. It is hoped, there- 
fore, that except in cases of extreme need, no re- 
quest will be made for aid this spring. 

For further information, application blanks, etc., 
address W. F. McMurry, Corresponding Secretary 
1025 Brook St., Louisville, Ky. 



THE NEW OLD BIBLE 

[CoNTrNT'RD BEOM P,\'~E ONE 1 

pointed Book to teach the things of God to all the 
race. Where the Bible is unknown natural religion 
degenerates into degrading idolatry and loathe- 
some superstitions. 

The Bible contains some thrilling history, but it 
is not a book of history.. It only uses history to 
enforce the claims of morals and religion. The Bi- 
ble contains some of the sublimest poetry that ever 
stirred human heart, but it is not a book of poems. 
It only uses poety to arouse man's powers and en- 
force the claims of religion. The Bible contains 
some profound philosophy, but it is not a book of 
philosophy. It only uses philosophy in the interest 
of religion. The Bible contains some of the finest 
literature in all the world, but it is not a collection 
of classic literature. It only uses literature to teach 
morals and religion. 

As the one universal book of the only Heaven- 
approved religion, the Bible can never be impeach- 
ed by any real or supposed historical inaccuracies, 
because it does not profess to teach history as an 
end in itself. As the supreme and universal book 
of morals and religion, the Bible can never be dis- 
credited by any real or imagined contradictions in 
past, present, or future scientific discoveries, be- 
cause the Bible does not pretend to teach science. 
Science deals with matter; religion deals with the 
human spirit in its relations to God. The God of 
Nature is the God of the Bible. Nature is the book 
of science. The Bible is the book of religion. The 
Bible is as easy understood as Nature. The miracles 
of the Bible are no more numerous or mysterious 
than the miracles of Nature. The Bible seeks to 
explain the spiritual. Science seeks to explain the 
physical. The Bible reveals the Nature of God; 
but science seeks to reveal the nature of matter. 
The Bible deals with man as related to eternity; 
but science deals with man as related to time. At 
best, science is nothing more than finding and fol- 
lowing the foot-prints of God — finding out what God 
has made, and how He made it. But the Bible deals 
with moral, spiritual and eternal values. 

As the Heaven-inspired book of universal religion 
the Bible is perfect — perfect as the final standard 
of morals and religion. Nothing can take its place. 
Nothing can add to its glory. It will stand the test 
of all the critics, high and low. It will continue to 
flame with the glory of God through all the shift- 
ing notions of human ignorance and folly. In it the 
humble, honest, broken heart will hear the 
voice of the Triune God above the rattle and roar, 
the clamor and confusion, the thunder and quaking 
of earth's material progress. Thoughtful men will 
continue to come to the old Book to hear the voice 
of redeeming love. Burdened souls will come to the 
Old Book to hear the voice of the tender Christ: 
"Be of good cheer: thy sins are forgiven thee." This 
Book has stood the tests of the past. It will stand 
the tests of the future. "The word of our God will 
stand forever." 



Page Six 



January 25, 1912 



From the Field 

,;.«»...»«« .....«.»»«»».».«.«»»»»»»»• : * 

NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— See changes in presiding elder's appointments, 
Greensboro District. 

— Mrs. N. W. Sapp, widow of the late Dr. Sapp, 
of Kernersville, died at her home in that place on 
Tuesday night of last week. 

— Rev. H. K. Boyer, our Conference Missionary 
Secretary, was among the speakers at an interde- 
nominational missionary rally at Laurinburg last 
week. 

— Mrs. Lance, wife of Rev. C. M. Lance, of the 
North Carolina Conference, died at the hospital 
in Wilmington on the 9th inst. Her death was 
peculiarly sad. 

Rev. W. L. Hutchins, pastor of Burkhead Insti- 
tutional Church, has accepted an invitation to ad- 
dress the Baraca-Philathea Union of Salisbury on 
Sunday, January 28. 

— Mrs. Clara Ware Kreichbaum, of Chambers- 
burg, Pa., daughter of Rev. W. R. Ware, is visiting 
her home people. She expects to return to her 
home in Pennsylvania, this week. 

— Brother Thomas C. Hoyle, a member of the Ad- 
vocate Board of Publication and one of Greens- 
boro's best lawyers, is now practicing law by him- 
self, the law firm of Hoyle & Wright having been 
dissolved. 

— The papers state that the Methodists of 
North waikesboro have begun making preparations 
for erection of their handsome new church, which 
will be located on the site where the old building 
now stands. 

— The Stony Point correspondent of the Taylors- 
ville Scout says: The building of the new church 
near the- Amity school house the erection of which 
is largely due to the efforts of Rev. T. B. Johnson, 
is progressing nicely. 

— Dr. John Grier Hibben, Stuart professor of 
Logic in Princeton University, has been elected 
to the presidency of that institution. He succeeds 
Governor Woodrow Wilson, who resigned more 
than a year ago to enter politics. 

— Miss Sarah Mae Rives, of Statesville, was mar- 
ried to Mr. Frank Bryant at the residence of the 
bride's brother, Mr. George P. Rives, in Charlotte, 
on Wednesday evening, January 17, Rev. *Dr. T. 
F. Marr, of Trinity Church, officiating. 

— We regret to learn that Mr. J. Lee Nelson, Jr., 
a student at Trinity College, and son of Mr. J. L. 
Nelson, of Lenoir, has been quite sick with ap- 
pendicitis. He submitted to an operation and at 
last accounts was doing as well as could be ex- 
pected. 

— General Julian S. Carr was the principal 
speaker at the Lee-Jackson anniversary exercises 
held by the Durham Graded Schools last Friday. 
He gave his young hearers many interesting per- 
sonal reminiscences of these two immortal leaders 
of the Confederacy. 

—Rev. Plato Durham, presiding Elder of the 
Winston District, delivered the address at the Lee- 
Jackson Day celebration in Charlotte last Friday 
and it goes without saying that he captivated his 
audience. The exercises were held in Trinitj 
church, which Brother Durham once served as 
pastor. 

— Many friends in the State will regret to learn 
that Mr. T. J. Copeland, formerly a citizen of 
Greensboro, but now of Baltimore, had the misfor- 
tune to fall on the ice in that city- last week and 
break his ankle. Mr. Copeland is the husband of 
Mrs. T. J. Copeland who for quite awhile edited 
our Woman's Home Mission Department. 

— The friends of Mr. B. L. Sides, for several 
years the cashier of the Bank of South Greensboro, 
and a prominent member of Spring Garden Street 
church, will be glad to learn that he is back from 
Baltimore where he went for treatment, very much 
improved, and ready to go to work. He is now 
with the Guilford Insurance and Realty Co. 

— Rev. T. A. Sikes, of the North Carolina Confer- 
ence, and pastor of Front Street Church, Burling- 
ton, made the Advocate a pleasant call on Wednes- 
day of last week. Brother Sikes was in the city 
looking over some of the churches in view of 
putting the finishing touches on their handsome 
new church at Burlington. They expect to open 
the church for worship on the third Sunday in 
February. Bishop Kilgo will preach the opening 
sermon. 



— Bishop Kilgo was the orator at the Robt. E. 
Lee celebration in Norfolk, Va„ Friday night, and 
press reports tell us that he delighted a large and 
cultured audience with a masterly address on the 
life and character of the Confederate chieftain. 
All who know our beloved Bishop will accept with- 
out qualification the statement that the address 
was one of the most eloquent and entertaining ever 
heard in the Virginia City. 

— We learn with much regret of the serious ac- 
cident which befell Mr. Miles O. Sherrill, State 
Librarian of Raleigh. In attempting to walk on 
the icy sidewalk in front of his home on Wednes- 
day of last week he slipped and fell, breaking his 
leg. He has suffered intensely and great anxiety 
is felt by his friends and relatives. Brother Sher- 
rill is one of the very best citizens of the Sta'r.e and 
we sincerely hope and pray for his recovery. 

—Mr. Jeremiah Highfill, the father of Rev. D. A. 
Highfill, pastor of the Mocksville Circuit of the 
North Carolina Methodist Protestant Conference, 
died recently at his home near Summerfield, Guil- 
ford Co., at the age of 85 years. He had been a 
member of the Flat Rock M. P. Church for 67 
years and was known as one of the best men in 
the county. He was the father of 19 children, 11 
of whom survive, together with his aged widow. 

— Our Methodist folks in the city of Greensboro 
and the religious forces in general are looking for- 
ward with great interest to the revival meeting that 
is to begin in West Market Street Church tomor- 
row The services are to continue for ten days and 
will be in charge of Herbert Booth, of London, a 
son of the head of the Salvation Army. He has an 
international reputation as an evangelist, and his 
coming to Greensboro is an event in the religious 
life of the city. 

— Rev. Dr. Leon. G. Broughton has resigned the 
pastorate of the Baptist Tabernacle, in Atlanta, 
Gar., to become pastor of Christ Church, London. 
Dr. Broughton is a native of North Carolina and 
one of the most widely known ministers of the 
Baptist denomination. If was only recently that 
Rev. A. C. Dixon, another native of North Carolina 
and one of the greatest Baptist preachers this 
country has produced, went to London to serve 
tie church of which Spurgeon was pastor for 
many years. 

— A Greenville special, January 18th, says: 
Greenville's distinguished townsman, ex-Gov. T. J. 
Jarvis, was 76 years old today. For the first time 
since he was taken sick seriously three weeks ago, 
he was today able to sit up with his clothes on 
for a few hours and receive the congratulations of 
his friends. When your correspondent saw him, 
he was exceedingly cheerful and expressed the hope 
of being out in a few days. There are many pray- 
ers that he may be spared for several more years 
of usefulness to his people. 

— Dr. Dred Peacock, of High Point, formerly presi- 
dent of Greensboro Female College, is being urged 
by many of his friends to become a candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for the State Senate 
from Guilford county this year. Dr. Peacock re- 
cently severed active connection with the furniture 
manufacturing interests in High Point with which 
he has been identified for several years, and we 
are advised that he is applying himself to the 
study of law. Should he enter the domain of poli- 
tics, he would be a potent factor and make his in- 
fluence felt for good. 

— Many Advocate readers will learn with regret 
of the death of Prof. George M. Smithdeal, presi- 
dent and founder of the Smithdeal Business Col- 
lege of Richmond. His death occurred at his home 
in Richmond on Friday, January 12th. Prof. 
Smithdeal first began his work as a teacher of 
young men and young women for business, in 
Greensboro, some thirty years ago, removing to 
Richmond where the door of opportunity seemed 
wider open to him. He was a good man and al- 
ways took great interest in everything looking to 
the advancement of morals and religion. He was 
a devout Methodist and leaves behind a record of 
loyalty in both church and state. 

— Mr. W. H. Swift, a member of the Greensboro 
bar and a son-in-law of Rev. W. M. Bagby, of the 
Western N. C. Conference, who has just re- 
turned from his first trip as secretary and field 
agent of an organization that is working to secure 
better child labor legislation in the state, talks 
encouragingly and says at Durham he was given a 
splendid reception by the mill men. He held Con- 
ferences with J. S. Carr, Jr., and W. A. Erwin and 
says they agreed with him in his suggestions for 
a better law regulating the labor of children. They 
expressed the opinion that -cotten mill men of the 



state will themselves suggest to the legislature the 
action that is needed. In carrying on his work of 
moulding public sentiment favorable to such an act, 
Mr. Swift will visit the mill men in Charlotte, Gas- 
tonia, Concord and other cotton mill centers in a 
short while. 

— Mr. J. A. Odell, who for many years has 'been 
the head of the Odell Hardware Company, one of 
the oldest, most substantial and best-known busi- 
ness concerns in North Carolina, last week dispos- 
ed of his interest in th^ company and retired from 
active participation in business. Mr. C. H. Ireland, 
former general manager and for a number of years 
practically the head of the concern, succeeds Mr. 
Odell as president, and the business will go right 
on as if no change had taken place. Mr. Odell is 
not only one of the best business men but one of 
the best men of the state and the Advocate con- 
gratulates him upon the grace with which he is 
permitted to retire from the cares of business af- 
ter such a long and successful career. We sin- 
cerely wish for him a long and happy career in 
retirement which he abundantly deserves. 



NOTES ABOUT ADVERTISERS 

— We direct special attention to the Ad. of the 
Southern Real Estate Co. on page 12. This com- 
pany has the remarkable record of over 15 years 
of business without one cent of loss to any patron. 
We strongly advise those having money to place 
where it is safe to correspond with these gentle- 
men. 

— The Trust Department of the Southern Life & 
Trust Co. has some specially attractive proposi- 
tions for those having money to invest, also for 
all having business requiring the services of a 
strong and reliable Trust Co. 

— The American Exchange Bank offers attractive 
accommodation to the public. The largest capi- 
talization and the largest deposit account in the 
city. Persons living out of the city can get ad- 
vantage of the savings department by mail. The 
Advocate takes great pleasure in commending the 
American Exchange to all who may be interested. 

— If it is a piano your are looking for see Mr. 
Frazier who sells the Cable. His ad. appears on 
third page of cover. 

— The Glasscock Stove and Mfg. Co., old and 
reliable. See ad. on 3d page of cover. 

— The Townsend Buggy Company can fit you up 
in good shape for the early spring days. See ad. 
on 3rd page of cover. 

— Be sure to look up the Greensboro advertisers 
on 3rd page of cover. The Advocate takes pleas- 
ure in commending these houses. 

— The Odell Hardware Company want you to 
look into the merits of the Guilford range. We 
take great pleasure in recommending this old re- 
liable firm. See ad. on 2nd page of cover. 



RAMSEUR AND FRANK LI NVILLE 

The Treasurer, Rev. R. M. Courtney, kindly in- 
forms us that Ramseur and Franklinville is the 
first charge to pay out in full on foreign missions. 

As Sam Jones used to say, "Come on, boys." 

O. P. Ader. 



NOTICE TO PASTORS 

For the next few weeks there will be some time 
that I can assist in meetings. The only cost it 
will be to brethren, will be to take their collection 
on the Educational Assessment at the close of th£ 
meeting. 

L. B. Abernethy. 



NOTICE 

I want to buy any or all copies of the Western 
North Carolina Conference Minutes from 1890 to 
1899 inclusive and will pay a reasonable price for 
them. Parties who have these old copies will 
please let me hear from them. 

W. L. Sherrill. 

Pineville, N. C. 



NOTICE 

The stewards of Bethel and Big Lick Circuit 
will please meet me at Bethel on the 4th Sunday 
of this month to hold the first Quarterly Confer- 
ence which was snowed under. Conference will 
be immediately after preaching. 

Let all official members be present. 

R. K. Brady, P. C 

This is by order of Dr. .1. C. Rowe, P. E. 



January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



REV. ELWOOD E. SMITH 

Rev. Elwood E. Smith was born in Randolph 
County, N. C, June 20th, 1845, died at his home 
in Iredell county, Wednesday morning, Dec. 27th, 
1911, aged 66 years, 6 months, 7 days. Brother 
Smith joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, when very young, and in the year 1875 was 
licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of 
the circuit to which he then belonged. He was 
later on ordained deacon and for some time be- 
fore his death, had been elected to Elder's Orders. 
He had not met a Bishop for the imposition of 
hands. He was a true and loyal Methodist local 
preacher for 36 years. He sometimes served as a 
supply and when Rev. G. W. Hardison died on the 
Davie Cirucit, he supplied the charge for the re- 
mainder of the year without remuneration for him- 
self and gave the support to the widow and family 
of Bro. Hardison. He was a very useful and ag- 
gressive man and will be much missed in the county 
and community in which he lived. The Statesville 
Landmark has this to say of him: "He took an 
active interest in public affairs, especially in coun- 
ty affairs. He was a progressive citizen and at 
all times gave his aid and influence to any move- 
ment for the upbuilding of the county and the 
promotion of the public "welfare." He has for 
most of his life been a member of Zion's Chapel 
Church and one of its pillars. On March 18th, 
1874 he was married to Miss Lineberry, of Yadkin 
County, N. C. She passed from earth to her re- 
ward about five years ago. Perhaps the greatest 
index to Bro. Smith's useful life, is the most ex- 
cellent family he reared. Nine children, five 
daughters and four sons survive him to mourn 
their loss. The writer conducted his funeral at 
Zion's Chapel on Thursday, Dec. 28th, 1911, after 
which his body with Masonic honors was laid to 
rest in the cemetery to await the resurrection of 
the just. 

"Servant of God, well done." 

A. J. Burrus. 



SPRAY AND DRAPER 

We are starting off V)ll and hope to make this 
the best year of the four. Our Sunday schools are 
In splendid condition; we have splendid Epworth 
Leagues Senior and Junior. Have received thirty 
new members since Conference. 

Miss Pattillo, our deaconess, is getting her work 
in fine shape and is making herself felt among our 
people. Our membership in the main, is loyal 
and enthusiastic and if things continue to go as 
they have, I will leave them next Conference with 
deep regrets. This is a work that no one could 
feel aggrieved if he should be assigned to it. 

T. C. Jordan, P. C. 



A MESSAGE FOR GREENSBORO DISTRICT 

The brethren of the Greensboro District wil note 
the second round of quarterly meetings begin early 
and reach well into the spring of the year. On the 
first round the work was organized and started, 
salaries fixed and the Conference assessments put 
in the hands of pastors and official brethren. Each 
congergation and every member should, by this 
time, know what is expected of them this year 
towards the support of the Church, and every one 
who wants to do a full year's service has surely 
begun before now to do it. To begin early and 
well goes a long ways toward a good ending. A 
late, sluggish start means a drag and a pull, if 
not defeat in the end. 

During the second quarter, time will be given to 
the consideration of special interests and to em- 
phasize things that may need emphasis. Now is 
the- time for sub-soiling and seed sowing. Care- 
ful preparation should be made if an abundant 
harvest is desired. In connectoin with the quar- 
terly meetings, then, wherever desired by the pas- 
tor and his people, we will hold mass- meetings or 
rally day services, beginning Friday or Friday 
night, and conclude with the 11 o'clock service Sun- 
day morning. These services can be made very 
helpful and instructive where the pastor and the 
local church take a lively interest in them and 
give time to prepare for them. The presiding elder 
will help to furnish the speakers, if the pastor 
will rally his people to get them to furnish good 
singing and a few sprightly, spicy, appropriate se- 
lections, or readings by the children and young 
people. 

The following is offered as a kind of outline or 
program. It is merely suggestive and can be chang- 



ed to meet the needs and conditions of a given 
church, or pastoral charge: 

Friday or Friday night — Sermon or an Address. 

Saturday, 9:30 a. m. — Opening Devotion. 

Saturday, 9:45 a. m.— Singing by visiting Sun- 
day school. 

Saturday, 10 a. m. — Address — Some phase of S. 
S. work. 

Saturday, 10:30 a. m. — Singing by another vis- 
iting Sunday school. 

Saturday, 10:45 a. m. — Recitation or Reading — 
young person. 

Saturday, 11 a. m. — Address on Missions. 

Saturday, 11:30 a. m. — Recitation by class of 
children. 

Saturday, 11:45 a. m. — Address on Home Relig- 
ion. 

Saturday, 12:15 p. m. — Dinner on church grounds 
Saturday, 1:30 p. m. — Singing by Sunday schools. 
Saturday, 2 p. m. — Quarterly Conference. 
Saturday, 3 p. m. — Address — Our Sunday Schools, 
Education. 

Saturday, 3:30 p. m. — Recitation or Reading — 
young person. 

Saturday, 3:45 p. m. — Address on Church Ex- 
tension. 

Saturday, 4:15 p. m. — Adjournment. 

Sunday, 9:30 a. m. — Regular Sunday School. 

Sunday, 11 a. m. — -Preaching, Lord's Supper. 

Let the meeting be well advertised, that there 
will positively be no collection for any purpose 
whatever, that we will begin on time and run by 
the schedule adopted. Get all the people not only 
to thinking about the meeting, but to praying for 
it, and all will have a profitable time. 

Will the pastors who desire such a meeting 
please let me know at once. ■ W. R. Ware. 



FROM LILESVILLE 

The itinerant wheel has made its annual round 
and we find ourselves pleasantly located in Liles- 
ville for another year. 

We are starting into our second year pleasantly. 
Many tokens of kindness have been shown us since 
coming to this charge. 

This charge I suppose, is like all other charges, 
it has its strong and weak points alike. We find 
many things to encourage us while we find some 
things not so encouraging. 

We have a goodly number of good loyal people to 
serve. These good people have by their many acts 
of kindness brought us under renewed obligation 
to them and made us to feel that our labor among 
them is appreciated. While it is our aim to do 
our best all the time yet, after we have received 
so many acts of kindness at the hands of these 
good people if we didn't try to do our best it would 
be ingratitude in us. Yes, we have been pounded 
twice. The first one came from Olivet church Sat- 
urday before Christmas. These good people sent 
to the parsonage many good things including a big 
nice turkey for Christmas. It is a yearly habit 
with Olivet to pound the preacher. 

The next one came from the good people of Liles- 
ville, Friday, January 13th. While the preacher 
was away from home there came a crowd to the 
parsonage led by Mrs. T. P. Richardson — Presby- 
terians, Baptists, and Methodists — and gave the 
preacher's family a real nice pounding. On my re- 
turn home I found so many good things I am tempt- 
ed to be away from home often. 

The unity of the different churches of our little 
town is not to be excelled by any. "Behold how 
pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in 
unity." 

May God richly reward these good people is our 
prayer. 

We join in prayer to the great Head of the 
church for a great outpouring of His Spirit upon 
our entire Conference this year, that many who are 
lost may be brought to God in the forgiveness of 
sin. J. W. Ingle. 



YADKINVILLE CIRCUIT ' 

On the 22nd of November we left the good people 
of Mt. Airy and of the Mt. Airy Circuit, where we 
spent two very pleasant years, and started out for 
the Yadkinville Circuit. We arrived here on the 
23rd. When we reached the parsonage we found 
about twenty-five people — men, women, and chil- 
dren of the different churches of the town ready 
to receive us. They gave us a most .hearty wel- 
come, and showed their appreciation by having a 
good warm fire and a good warm dinner. The 
same evening the good people of the town gave 
us a most generous pounding; but this is not all. 



On Christmas day the people of the town came to 
the parsonage again and gave us another pounding, 
such as we had never had before. A kinder peo- 
ple we have never met. 

I take the opportunity of thanking this good 
people for their kindness. We feel that we are 
brought under lasting obligations to them and hope 
that we may be a blessing to them this year in 
giving them the plain truths of the gospel. This 
we will try to do. J. D. Gibson. 



TO OUR CHURCH FRIENDS 

If you receive a sample copv of the Advocate this Is 
an invitation to subscribe. We are sending out many 
samples, and we trust many will decide to send in 
their subscriptions at once. Send money direct to us 
or hand to your pastor. 



OUR ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

Reports of new subscribers and renewals sent in by 



pastors to date, January 23rd: 

Renewals New 

Asheville District 

Rev. J. O. Ervin 9 l 

Total — 9 — l 

Charlotte District 

Rev. G. D. Herman l l 

Rev. W. L. Sherrill 6 

Rev. W. C. Jones 1 

Total — 8 — 1 

Franklin District 

Rev. J. F. Starnes 4 

Total — 4 

Greensboro District 

Rev. S. T. Barber l 

Rev. J. T. Stover 4 

Rev. A. L,. Avcock l 

Rev. W. F. Womble 1 1 

Spring Garden , l 

Rev. W. R. Ware 2 

Rev. O. P. Ader 2% 

Total v. ; — 8 — 5% 

Morganton District 

Rev. D. S. Richardson 1 

Rev. R. E. Hunt l 

Total .' — 1 — 1 

Mount Airy District 

Rev. Z. V. Johnson 2 

Rev. J. M. Folger l 

Total — 1 --2 

North Wilkesboro District 

Rev. J. E. McSwain 1 

Rev. H. V. Clark 1 

Total — 1 — 1 

Salisbury' District 

Rev. J. W. Clegg 1 

Rev. W. T. Albright „ 1 

Rev. G. A. Harley 1 

Rev. J. P. Rodgers 1 

Rev. G. A. Stamper 1 

Rev. R. L. Forbis 1 

Rev. F. W. Dibble 1 

Total — 5 — 2 

Shelby District 

Rev. J. H. Robertson 1 

Rev. T. J. Rogers 1% 

Rev. W. B. Davis 1 

Rev. J. F. Harrelson 1 

Rev. E. N. Crowd er 1 

Total — 2 — 3% 

Statesville District 

Rev. E. Myers 1 

Rev. J. P. Davis 1 

Rev. T. E. Wagg 1 

Rev. C. M. Pickens 1 

Rev. J. W. Kennedy 1 

Rev. E. E. Yates 1 

Rev. J. J. Eads 1 

Rev. J. J. Edwards 3 

Total . — 7 — 3 

Waynesville District 

Rev. J. H. Green ' 2 

Rev. T. 6. Coble 1 

Total — 2 — 1 

Winston District 

Rev. Li. T. Hendren 1 

Rev. J. T. Ratledge 2 3 

Rev. F. L. Townsend 1 

Total — 3 .— 4 

Grand total —47 —29 



OUR PRIZE OFFER 

1. To the pastor or layman sending in the largest 
number of new subscribers (not less than thirty) dur- 
ing the month of February, we propose to give a cash 
prize of $15.00. These must all be in by sunset on 
Thursday, February 29th, accompanied by the cash. 
We mean yearly subscribers, amounting to not less 
than $45.00. 

2. To the pastor or layman sending in the largest 
number of renewals during February, (not less than 
thirty) we will give a cash prize of $10.00. 

All must be yearly subscriptions and the money 
must be paid in by the date designated in the terms 
of the contest, and the contestant must be personally 
responsible for all names entered on this account. 

Let the good work begin at once and continue until 
we have at least 10,000 subscribers, as we ought to 
have. 



In sending lists please do not send names of persons 
who do not offer any prospect of becoming subscribers. 
Be sure also to give street addresses where there is a 
city delivery and be careful to give the number of the 
route where there is rural free delivery. Also follow 
the sample copies with the canvass. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 25, 1912 



Foreign Mission Department 

Mrs. D. M. Litaker, Press Superintendent, Hickory, N. C. 



President 

Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson Greensboro 

Honorary Vice-President 

Mrs. J. E. Ray Asheville 

First Vice-President 

Mrs. G. G. Harley Asheville 

Second Vice-President 

Mrs. L. H. Martin Greensboro 

Third Vice-President 

Mrs. R. R. Alley Greensboro 

Fourth Vice-President 

Mrs. D. B. Coltrane Concord 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. M. H. Stewart Charlotte 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. L. W. Crawford Winston-Salem 

Treasurer 

Mrs. P. N. Peacock Salisbury 

Auditor 

Mr. A. L>. Smoot Salisbury 

Superintendent of Supplies 

Miss Alice Smith Asheville 

Press Superintendent 

Mrs. D. M. Litaker Hickory 

District Secretaries 

Asheville District Mrs. W. R. Harris 

Charlotte District Mrs. J. J. Crow 

Franklin District Miss Laura Jones 

Greensboro District. .Mrs. A. E. Fordharr 
Morganton District. .Mrs. M. T5. Goodwin 

Mt. Airv District Mrs. T. W. FiHd 

North Wllkpsboro ..Mrs. W. F. Trogdon 

Salisbury District Mrs. D. A. Beaver 

Shelhv District Mrs. B. T. Morris 

Statesville District Mrs. D. J. Kimball 

Wavnesville District. .Mrs. M. F. Moores 
Winston District Mrs. Frank Martin 



FROM REIDSVILLE AUXILIARY 

Nothing has been sent from our So- 
ciety for some time, so think it is 
time we were being heard from and 
that we were telling you something of 
the condition of our work. We havt 
just closed our business affairs for the 
past year, or ten months, and wen 
glad to be able to send a clean sheet 
in to Mrs. Peacock. This was done 
after much anxiety and work on the 
part of the faithful Treasurer, Mrs 
A. L. Harris. Being two months short 
of time, there was some difficulty in 
getting together these collections. The 
first week in December our Society 
observed with prayer and fasting. We 
held services at the church for three 
successive afternoons, Monday, Tues- 
day, and Wednesday, and on Thursday 
held a free will offering reception at 
tlie parsonage. The program for the 
afternoon was "A trip over the Sea," 
and to the ladies who were in charge, 
we are due a great many thanks, for 
it was both enjoyable and instructive 
Nice refreshments were served in ev- 
ery room free, and each guest brought 
an offering. Our ladies did not come 
out to this as we had hoped, and as a 
result our receipts were small but we 
trust that the bread cast on the wa- 
ters may return after many days. We 
have 56 members in our society, and 
ought to have as many more. Mrs 
Lucy Trotter has been our president 
for several years and was re-elected at 
our last meeting. 

Our ladies seem interested and our 
average attendance is fairly good, but 
how much more we could do, if we 
could only get all the ladies of our 
Church to come in and help. Our Mis- 
sion Study Class was organized soor 
after the Jubilee was held in Greens 
boro, and a few of us are enjoying 
this and hope to be benefitted and 
enlarged by it. We still have no Young 
People's Missionary Society. Some of 
our young people were organized into 
a Pastor's Aid Society two months ago 
under the guidance of our pastor, Rev. 
Mr. Wlomble. January 11th was ob- 
served by fasting and prayer as re- 
quested in the Advocate With many 
prayers, and hearty co-operation for 
the missionary work, I am 

Very Sincerely, 
Mrs. A. Wilkinson, 
Cor. Sec. Reidsville Aux. 



We are glad to have this interest- 
ing communication from Reidsville. 
We echo the writer in saying if more 
of the women of the Church would 
take part in the missionary work, 
what might we accomplish? 



REPORT FROM MUIR'S CHAPEL 
AUXILIARY 

On December 26th, 1911, we met at 
Muir's Chapel in a union Golden Ju- 
bilee meeting, the Friends, of Guilford 
College, meeting with us. Notwith- 
standing the rain and mud which in- 
terfered very much with the congrega- 
tion, we had a good meeting result- 
ing in much good to all who attended. 
We were highly entertained and edified 
by addresses by Revs. Albert Peele, 
Eli Reece and W. R. Ware, and Mrs. 
A. E. Fordham, and others. We will 
long remember the occasion with joy. 

Again on January 17th, 1912, our 
Society met and had the pleasure of 
having with us Mrs. A. E. Fordham, 
our District Secretary, and Miss Nel- 
lie Rogers, deaconess ot West Market, 
Greensboro. Mrs. Fordham presided 
over the meeting and after the trans- 
action of usual business, Miss Rogers 
and Mrs. Fordham each gave us an 
address which we very much enjoyed 
to our profit and pleasure. We then 
proceeded to elect new officers for the 
new year with the following results: 
Mrs. C. A. Boren, President; Mrs. D. 
A. Edmonson, 1st Vice-President; Mrs. 
R. W. Edwards, 2nd Vice-President; 
Mrs. Eva Harvey, 3rd Vice-President; 
Mrs. W. L. Dawson, 4th Vice-President 
Miss Maud Boren, Recording Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Mollie Edwards, Corres- 
ponding Secretary; Mrs. C. P. Boren, 
Treasurer, and Mrs. W. J. Dean, Voice 
A.gert. After adjournment we all, by 
special invitation, repaired to the 
Muir's Chapel Graded School building 
where we were served with steaming 
'not coffee, by Misses Kennett and Har- 
per, the teachers of said graded school, 
assisted by Misses Furr and Gordon, 
two of the pupils. After spending 
some time pleasantly and socially to- 
gether we retired to our homes ex- 
tending a hearty vote of thanks to 
these young ladies for their thought- 
fulness, kindness and hospitality. 

Mrs. W. L. Dawson, Ex-Pres. 

Muir's Chapel always sends us in- 
teresting reports. This is a fine so- 
ciety. — Editor. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR PRESIDENTS 
OF AUXILIARIES 

Be regular in holding the monthly 
meetings, having a fixed time and 
place. Study the program of that meet- 
ing as given in the Missionary Voice 
the previous month. 

Call your Executive Committee to- 
gether, if possible, once a month just 
after the regular monthly meeting, 
then, after prayer and a few words of 
Scripture, review the work, taking an 
account of stock, as it were. Plan for 
next month's meeting. Do not be afraid 
to "vary the meetings. Give each one 
something to do. Appoint the Vice- 
Presidents in turn to assist you at the 
next meeting. (If at all watchful they 
will see during the month in the daily 
or religious papers something to read 
or tell about.) Have the Executive 
Committee to study the monthly pro- 
gram in the Missionary Voice, and see 
that each of them has from month to 
month a copy of the leaflet for the next 
meeting. 

Ascertain from the Treasurer how 
much money is in hand. Appoint the 
Secretary to ask the pastor if there 
are any new members of the Church 
to whom she shall send a card with 
time, place, etc., of the monthly meet- 
ing. Each President or her Secretary 
should have a list of every family in 
the church, obtained from her pastor. 
A.11 women on this list who are not 
already members of the Missionary 
Society should be invited to unite. The 
list will also be useful in sending out 
notices, etc. 

After each communion season, if any 
women or young ladies have been re- 
ceived into the church, have the Secre- 
tary get their addresses from the pas- 



tor and write them a personal letter, 
an invitation to become members of 
the Missionary Society of your Church, 
stating the amount constituting mem- 
bership dues, with names of officers, 
time and place of meeting, etc. Then, 
as President, make it convenient as 
soon as possible to call upon the new- 
comers and cordially invite them to 
the next meeting. If the president can- 
not follow up the personal letter, let 
her see that one of her Vice-Presi- 
dents does it. 

Try to adopt some plan to receive 
the monthly gifts regularly. Careful- 
ly consider the different ways, and 
adopt the best way for receiving all 
contributions. 

Have the Treasurer give a report at 
the monthly meeting of moneys re- 
ceived, and see that the sum in hand 
is sent every three months to the Con- 
ference Treasurer and the receipt 
filed away. 

Have some person appointed to se- 
cure subscriptions to the Missionary 
Voice, and forward to Mrs. A. L. Mar- 
shall, 810 Broadway, Nashville, Tenn. 
The price is fifty cents a year. Select 
for this office one who will not merely 
receive subscriptions, but one who will 
faithfully endeavor to secure subscrip- 
tions. One who will not herself sub- 
scribe and does not read the paper is 
by that fact disqualified for the work 
of agent. 

It is pleasant and profitable to have 
a watchword, or text of Scripture, for 
vour motto or inspiration for the year; 
and at each monthlj' meeting repeat 
in concert. Invite the ladies to study 
it and bring a thought or text upon 
it. Then at the annual meeting have 
the delegate, when her name upon the 
roll is called, repeat it as the watch- 
word of her society. 

A president of even a small society 
should be familiar with parliamentary 
rules, so that she may conduct the bus- 
iness of her auxiliary expeditiously. 
The simple rules found in this book 
should be carefully read and observed. 
The President should keep informed 
about all the missionary work of the 
Woman's Missionary Council, and be 
ready to encourage individual work 
and an increasing liberality among all 
the members. 

Let your slogan be: "Enlist every 
woman in the church in mission work." 
To this end undertake a vigorous cam- 
paign for new members. One of the 
best ways for doing this is to appor- 
tion the names of the Church women 
to the members of the society living 
nearest, who will promise to go in per- 
son and cordially invite them to join 
your ranks. 

If you seek divine aid, you will re- 
ceive it, and your influence will be felt 
far and near. Your labor will not be 
in vain in the Lord. (1 Cor. xv. 58.) — 
Helps for Missionary Societies. 



THE ULTIMATUM OF CHINA'S 
PRESIDENT 

President Sun Yat Sen, of the re- 
public of China, adheres to his decla- 
ration that he would resign the presi- 
dency of the republic when the Man- 
chu government had been ousted and 
peace completely restored throughout 
the country. The abdication of the 
emperor, he declares, is the first step 
toward the pacification and reorgani- 
zation of the country; but before peace 
can be assured, the Manchu army 
must lay down its arms and all semb- 
lance of Manchu power must be re- 
nounced formally and publicly. Events 
seen now to a peace such as President 
Sun demands, for the Manchus evi- 
dently realize that their day of power 
is gone. — Nashville Christian Advo- 
cate. 



General Li, one of the leaders in 
the revolutionary movement in China, 
is quoted as saying: "I am strongly 
in favor of foreign missionaries com- 
ing to China, teaching Christianity and 
going into interior provinces. We 
shall do all we can to assist mission- 
aries; and the more we get to come 
to China, the greater will the repub- 
lican government be pleased. 



Knees Became Stiff 

Five Years of Severe Rheumatism 

The cure of Henry J. Goldstein, 14 
Barton Street, Boston, Mass., is anoth- 
er victory by Hood's Sarsaparilla. 
This great medicine has succeeded in 
many cases where others have utterly 
failed. Mr. Goldstein says: "I suf- 
fered from rheumatism five years, it 
kept me from business and caused ex- 
cruciating pain. My knees would be- 
come as stiff as steel. I tried many 
medicines without relief, then took 
Hood's Sarsaparilla, soon felt much 
better, and now consider myself en- 
tirely cured. I recommend Hood's." 

Get it today in usual l.iquid form or 
chocolated tablets called Sarsatabs, 



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January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Pago Nln« 



Home Mission Department 

Conducted by Mrs. W. L, Nicholson 



THE CHRIST OF THE AGES 

Ix>ok, child of time, He comes, the Son 
of God, 

First promise to the fathers from of 
old! 

His steps, through the long ages mark- 
ed with blood, 
He comes to die the death so long 
foretold. 

First and last promise, lo! He comes, 

He comes, 
To fight our battles, crush the ser- 

pant's head, 
To conquer death, to burst earth's iron 

tombs, 

Himself the Lord of living and of 
dead. 

The prophet's eye is dim, 
The prophet's lips are dumb, 

But He, the prophet's theme, 
The woman's seed has come! 

Creation's gladness, hope of weary 
man, 

How clear Thy splendor, though but 
seen afar! 
Light of the universe, long pale and 
wan, 

Now rising in Thy tsrength, heaven's 
sweetest star. 
Son of the blessed, lo! He comes at 
last, 

The songs of ages now in Him ful- 
filled, 

God manifest in flesh. The night is 
past, 

And the true day begins to be re- 
vealed. 

The prophet's eye is dim, 
The prophet's lips are dumb 

But He, the prophet's theme, 
The woman's seed has come! 

To die the death which only He can 
die; 

To do the work which only He can do, 
And lift the lost one up to stand on 
high. 

With crown and scepter, lo! He comes 
to reign, 

As prince of peace to sheathe war's 
wasting sword; 
With glory, honor, blessing in His 
train, 

He comes, creation's righteous Heir 
and Lord. 

The prophet's eye is dim, 
The prophet's lips are dumb, 

But He, the prophet's theme, 
The woman's seed has come! 



A PRAYER FOR THE DAY 

Once more a new day lies before us, 
our Father. As we go out among men 
to do our work, touching the hands 
and lives of our fellows, make us, we 
pray Thee, friends of all the world. 
Save us from blighting the fresh ' ow- 
er of any heart by the flare of sudden 
anger or secret hate. May we not 
bruise the rightful self-respect of any 
by contempt or malice. Help us to 
cheer the suffering by our sympathy, 
to freshen the drooping by our hope- 
fulness, and to strengthen in all the 
wholesome sense of worth and the joy 
of life. | Save us from the deadly poi- 
son of class pride. Grant that we may 
look all men in the face with the eyes 
of a brother. If anyone needs us, make 
us ready to yield our help ungrudg- 
ingly, unless higher duties claim us, 
and may we rejoice that we have it 
in us to be helpful to our fellowmen. — 
Walter Rauschenbusch. 



THE WOMAN'S MISSION COUNCIL 

The annual session of the Woman's 
Missionary Council will convene at Mt. 
Vernon Church, Washington, D. C, 
April 10th, to 17th. The Executive 
Committee will meet at 11 a. m. at 
the church. At 2 p. m. "The Workers' 
Conference" will hold a session, over 
which Miss Mabel Head will preside. 
At this conference the plans of work 
as adopted by various Conference So- 
cieties will be discussed by the Confer- 
ence Secretaries and other members of 
the Council. 



The first public service will be held 
at 7:30 p. m., when the communion 
service will be conducted by the pas- 
tor and Presiding Elder of the church. 
Miss Belle H. Bennett, president of 
the Council, will make an address at 
this evening session. Subject, "A Re- 
sume of the Work of the Woman's 
Missionary Council." 



MONEYS FOR 1912 

The cost of maintaining the work of 
the Home Department is growing be- 
yound the available sum for approp- 
riation to current expenses. For three 
years we have been unable to keep 
within the available moneys for the 
support of the regular work. Direct- 
ed specials and the return of the Con- 
ference half of dues for Conference 
Society work, have ben so large a part 
of the collections, it has necessitated 
the use of directed funds for current 
expenses temporarily, which must be 
replaced. There must be a larger un- 
directed income if the work of thf 
Home Department grows. This may be 
accomplished by every auxiliary aver- 
aging $7.00 per member per year for 
both home and foreign work. The 
"Forward Movement" campaign cry 
is that each united auxiliary may av- 
erage 15 cents a week per member. 
Half of that amount for one depart- 
ment averages $3.50 per year. ThiF 
does not mean that women who have 
given larger sums in the past are call- 
ed to make smaller gifts. "Doublin? 
members and doubling gifts" is the 
meaning of the present program. 



SPECIALS FOR HOME DEPART- 
MENT, 1912 
For the Junior Division 

1. Remodeling Ruth Hargrove In- 
stitute dormitory and purchase of lots 
$7,000.00. 

2. Finishing the cost of the Chapel 
at Mary Helm Hall, $3,000.00. 

For Baby Division 

1. Maintaining the Wesley House 
and School at West Tampa. 



250,000 WOMEN FOR 1912 

The slogan this year for the wo- 
man's work of the church is 250, OOP 
members enrolled in the missionary 
societies before Dec. 31, 1912. If each 
auxiliary makes a campaign for this 
it may be accomplished in one month 
Why not determine to double the mem- 
bership of your auxiliary this month? 
Let the March meeting be set for the 
time when these new names are re- 
ported. 



HAVE YOU SEEN IT? 

What? 

The "Forward Movement Quiz." 

Many questions have come to the 
offices concerning the "Forward Move- 
ment", and these have been compiler' 
and answered in this leaflet. Order 
enough for every member from Mrs. 
H. R. Steele, 810 Broadway, Nashville. 
Tenn. Mrs. Steele is the manager of 
the "Forward Movement Campaign" 
for the Woman's Missionary Council. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSION SOCIETY 

Record of report for General Treas- 
urer by Treasurer of W. N. C. Confer- 
ence, Quarter ending December 30, 
1911: 

Dues 

Amount raised by member 
ship dues — adults .... 

Amount raised for member- 
ship dues — Young People. 

Amount raised by Babv Roll 

Amount raised for Brigade 
dues 



$ 507.08 

12.50 
2.50 

7.90 



Amount raised from baby Mite 

Boxes 16.77 

Amount raised from Confer- 
ence pledge — freewill offer- 
ing 546.22 

Amount raised for Named 
Loan Fund, Retirement 

Fund 1.35 

Specials, Lucinda Helm Fund 61.58 
Scarritt Bible and Training 

School 29 . 59 

Total sent to Con. Treas ..$1596.74 
Amount raised for Conference 

Expense Fund 60.65 

Total sent to General Treas- 
urer $1536.09 

Value of supplies sent off and 

reported to superintendent 232.65 

Local Work 

Value of supplies given locally 329.64 
Amount expended for assis- 
tance of needy 35.55 

Cash expended on parsonage 699.67 
Cash expended on furnishing 

church, etc 397.56 

Conference Expense Fund Ex- 
pended by Auxiliaries 34.20 

Brevard 50.00 

Children's Home 125.00 

For City Auxiliaries 

Amount expended for city mis- 
sion work 629.90 

Total expended and reported 
to Conference Treasurer... 2534.17 

Grand total $4130.90 

Mrs. R. L. Hoke, 
Conference Treasurer. 
Canton, N. C, Box 365. 



Special Donatirrs 

Amount raised during week 

of Prayer— Adults 348.35 

Amount raised during Week 

of Prayer — Young People . . 2.25 



FROM BREVARD 

My Dear Mrs. Nicholson: I wonder 
if you would like to have an expres- 
sion from our Chapter of the Woman's 
Missionary Society at Brevard. 

Well, I am going to presume that 
vou would, and will tell you the termi- 
nation of a "love match." 

The participants were: The local 
Home and Foreign Auxiliaries of the 
one great missionary cause. 

At the December meeting of the 
Home Department these auxiliaries 
'inited, then officers for the ensuing 
year were elected. 

At the January meeting reports of 
the year's work were read by the re- 
tiring officers and showed gratifying 
?ains along almost all lines of the 
work yet these written reports of the 
work done, told only part of the story 
of what has really been accomplished 
through the splendid efforts of the 
individual memberships, the various 
committees and the chairmen of the 
various departments. 

After the reading of the reports our 
nastor, Rev. Loy D. Thompson, con- 
lucted the beautiful and impressive 
'nstallation service which makes each 
officer feel the responsibility as- 
sumed in accepting this trust. 

By way of refreshing our minds he 
rehearsed the constitution and by-laws 
of the society then he spoke encourag- 
mgly of the work, and told the bene- 
fits to be derived from a mission 
study class. 

We are planning to use all Home 
Department literature with reports 
from Home Department officers at one 
meeting in the month, then at the 
other meeting (we meet semi-monthly) 
use only Foreign Mission literature. 

This first meeting of this united 
Society was large and the officers and 
entire membership enthusiastic and if 
we are to judge the entire year by this 
meeting you may expect to hear from 
us occasionally, telling you that some- 
thing is doing up here. 

Mesdames W. L. Wiley and Mrs. 
Harry Plummer were our gracious 
hostesses at this meeting and after 
the formal adjournment they served a 
course of delicious salads and the 
members snent a most delightful half 
hour, socially. 

Mrs. B. T. Egerton, 
Brevard, N. C. 

(It is always a pleasure to hear from 
the thriving society at Brevard, par- 
ticularly in this instance when the se- 
quel of a "love-match" is related. It 
will mean much better and broader 
work for both departments. — Editor.) 



Smoke of Herbs 

Cures Catarrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 



This preparation of herbs, leaves, 
flowers and berries (containing no to- 
bacco or habit-forming drugs) is eith- 
er smoked in an ordinary clean pipe 
or smoking tube, and by drawing the 
medicated smoke into the mouth and 
inhaling into the lungs or sending it 
out through the nostrils in a perfectly 
natural way, the worse case of Catarrh 
can be eradicated. 

It Is not unpleasant to use, and at 
the same time is entirely harmless, 
and can be used by man, woman or 
child. 

Just as catarrh is contracted by 
breathing cold or dust and ger-laden 
air, ust so this balmy antiseptic smok- 
ing remedy goes to all the affected 
oarts of the air passages of the head, 
iose, throat and lungs. It can readily 
be seen why the ordinary treatments 
=;uch as sprays, ointments, salves, 
'iquid or tablet medicines fail — they 
do not and can not reach all the af- 
fected parts. 

If you have catarrh of the nose, 
f hroat or lungs, chocking, stopped-up 
f eeling, colds, catarrhal headaches; 
if you are given to hawking and spif- 
fing, this simple yet scientific treat- 
ment should cure you. 

An illustrated book which goes 
thoroughly into the whole question of 
••he cause, cure and prevention of ca- 
tarrh will, upon request be sent you by 
nr. J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton street, 
\tlanta. Ga. 

He wil lalso mail you five days free 
treatment. You will at once see that 
it is a wonderful remedy, and as it 
only costs one dollar for the regular 
'reatment, it is within the reach of 
"■veryone. It is not necessary to send 
any money — simply send your name 
ind address and the booklet and free 
'rial package will be mailed you im- 
mediately. 



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producing the most beau- 
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when fresh and beautiful 
flowers are wanted. Out 
of town orders have prompt 
attention. 

SUMMIT AVENUE 
GREENHOUSES 

OWARD GARDNER, Proprietor 
Greensboro, N. C. 



C Fine POST CARDS 

Send only 2c stamp and re- 
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Post Cards FREE, to Introduce p<*t curd oflV r. 
Capita 1 Card Co., Dept. 146, Topeka, K;n. 



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DR. ELDERS' TOBACCO BOON BANISHES all 
forms of Tobacco Habit in 72 to 120 hours. A posi- 
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No craving for Tobacco after the first dose. One 
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Elders' Sanatorium. Dept. GO St. Joseph, Mo. 



Page Ten 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by H. A. Hayes, Superintendent 



THE CHILD'S BIRTHRIGHT 

Every child's birthright is a happy 
home. No human foresight can pro- 
vide for the child a happy life. The 
future may be full of disappointments 
and heartaches. But there is gladnses 
enough for the children while they 
are in the home nest. 



A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY 

He who makes a child happy now 
will make him happy twenty year? 
hence by the memory of this kindness. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

During the Christmas holidays we 
received a good many boxes, barrels 
and packages. Some of these were 
not marked clearly enough for us ti 
know who sent them. If names are 
not given in the following list, we are 
none the less grateful. And we shall 
be glad to have the names sent to us 
now. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS RE 
CEIVED BY H. A. HAYES, SUPT., 
FOR WEEK ENDING JANUARY 
20, 1912 

D. E. Iwick, Woodleaf S. S., Wood 
leaf Circuit, $.S0; W. S. Upright 
Triplett S. S., Mooresville Charge 
$1.03; Jas. R. Howard, Gilboa S. S 
Morganton Charge, $.80; J. Robt 
Long, Bryson City S. S., Bryson an? 
Wbittier Charge, $2.01; A. N. Linvillr 
Kernersville S. S., Kernersville Charg- 
$3.40; Thos. C. Hoyle, Bethel S. S. 
Pomona Charge, $.81; C. R. Laney 
Central S. S., Monroe Charge, $6.03- 
W. J. Swanscn, Pilot Mountain S. S. 
Pilot Mountain Charge, $1.01; C. F 
Edwards, Bethany S. S., Jeffersor 
Charge, $1.10; Anthony L. Payne, Ru 
ral Hall S. S., Rural Hall Charge, $.83- 

G. P. Rodgers, S. S., Hen 

derson Charge, $1.49; A. J. Coleman 
Oak Forest S. S., Hayesville Charge 
$.55; Rev. W. K. Houk, Oak Forest 
Morganton Charge, $1.70; W. H 
Speas, New Hope S. S., Louisville 
Charge, $.90; Total $22.46; Total col 
lections reported to date for Fift- 
Sunday in December, $393.98. 

Cash 

J. S. L. Orr, General Support, $10: 
Rev. T. H. Stimpson, General Support 
$1.75; Rev. Jno. W. Moore, First 
Church, Salisbury, $15.00; W. G 
Penry, Capt. T. L. Rawley's Bible 
Class, special support, $41.67; Rev. A 
R. Surratt, Madison and Mayodan 
$4.05; Henry C. Jones, Salem Church 
Southside and Salem Charge, $5.00: 
R. L. Snow, Alexander Circuit, $13.16: 
Rev. J. A. Holmes, Denton Charge 
$1.30; W. P. McGehee, Centenary Ba 
raca Class, special support of Rush 
Varner, $16.67; H. A. Hayes, subscrip- 
tions to Record, $13.50. Total $122.10. 



REPORT OF JNO. F. KIRK, AGENT. 
FOR WEEK ENDING JANUARY 
20, 1912 

Paid on Open Subscriptions 

Concord: Miss Cooper Miller, $5.00. 
Cherry ville: W. J. Dellinger, $3.00, 
Fallston: Dr. E. A. Houser, $25.00. 
Fort Mills, S. C: W. C. Howie, $5.00. 
Greensboro: Mrs. Florence G. Field, 
$1.00. High Point: J. E. Kirkman, 
$100.00. Lawndale: Mrs. E. A. Alex- 
ander, $2.00; S. A. Parker $5.00 Le- 
noir: Mrs. G. M. Goforth, $2.50. 
Mocksville: Miss Bettie Lin ville, 
$1.00. Monroe: W. B. Brown, $5.00; 
Joseph Hinson, $2.50. Sbelby: R. 
M. Laughridge, $5.00. Total, $162.00. 
Paid on Notes 

Concord: W. B. Ward, $2.50; E. C. 
Turner, $10.00; J. B. Sherrill, $50.00; 
W. B. Brutcn, $25.00; R. A. Brower, 
$5.00; J. M. Sills, $10.00; B. Frank 
Mills, $5.00; A. G. Odell, $12.50. . Hen- 
dersonville: W. E. Shipman, $2.50. 
Total, $122.50. Total on subs, $162.00. 
Grand total, $284.50. 



THE COMPASS 

"When He, the Spirit of Truth, is 
come, He will guide you into all 
truth." John 16:13. 

The carriage was at the door. Papa, 
mamma, and Clara Bell had said good 
bye to everybody at least six times, 
for were they not to cross the great 
ocean to be gone a long time, and it 
takes more than one good bye to last 
ill summer. 

Papa and mamma were sad, but 
Clara Bell was not sad at all. Why 
should she be, when there were so 
■nany new things to see? And wasn't 
•namma going, too? Can anybody be 
sad when she has her mamma? 

But when they were on the steamer 
and the last spire of the city had dis- 
appeared and the last brown line of 
^hore had faded, Clara Bell drew a 
'ittle sigh. 

"Why, it's nothing but water," she 
said. "Where shall I go to walk?" 

"Oh, you must walk on deck," said 
napa. 

"Out where shall I get dandelions 
<md buttercups, and hear the birds 

sing?" 

"You must wait for the poppies on 
'he other side," said papa, "and may- 
be you will see the big seabirds — a 
jjull, perhaps." 

So Clara watched for the sea gulls 
every day, but she did not sigh any 
more, for there was a great deal to 
see on the steamer, even if there 
vere no buttercups. 

There were ropes and sails, and lit- 
the boats at the side of the vessel 
and ever so many queer things. She 
vent down into the engine-room one 
lay but she did' not stay long, because 
t was so warm. And she was always 
sober afterwards, when she thought 
">f the poor heated men working by the 
hot fire. 

But the best place on the steamer 
°or Clara Bell was the pilot house. She 
iked to stand there and watch the 
man with his hands on the wheel. 
Sometimes she talked with him. 

"I don't see any path in the water," 
she said. 

"No miss, it's all the same," the 
•nan answered. 

"But how do you know where you 
are going?" asked the puzzled child. 

"That tells rne," said the pilot, point- 
: ng to something which looked to 
Clara Bell like a big watch. "It's a 
n ompass, the pilot explained, and true 
to the north. That's my guide. It 
shows me the way." 

Clara Bell stood looking at the com- 
nass when papa came to find her. 
"That's a guide," she said, "that needle 
points straight and true, and shows 
the way." 

"Yes," said papa, "the sailor at sea 
or the traveler on land must look at 
his compass and watch the pointing 
finger if he wishes to keep in the right 
way and reach his home." 

"Is there another compass," asked 
Clara Bell, in surprise. 

"Oh, yes," was the answer, "any- 
body can have a compass, and there is 
something else that anybody well may 
have — it is a guide in his heart to 
point out the right way. We call this 
guide the Spirit of God. It would be 
sad to be left on the great ocean with 
nothing to show the way. It is more 
sad to be without any guide into the 
way of truth." Clara Bell was so in- 
terested in the cotnnass after this 
that when they landed in Liverpool, 
papa bought her a pocket compass 
and she carried it everywhere with 
her to remind ber to keep a compass 
in her heart. — Child's Hour. 



"Willingness to know the truth 
about oneeself is the mark of a brave 
character; eagerness to hear opinions 
about oneself is the mark of a weak 
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January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 





THE PINK STRING 

"Peter," said his mother, "I want 
you to do a little errand for me." 

"Yes, mother, tell me quick, for 
it's most school time." 

"You will be sure and not forget?" 

"Oh, mother, Jack Ray's been tell- 
ing me that whenever he has an er- 
rand to do his mother ties a string 
round his finger. That keeps him 
in mind every time he looks at it. 
Did you ever hear of any one doing 
that?" 

"Yes, many a time. So you would 
like a string?" 

"Yes, here's the string bag\ and 
here's a nice piece of pink string." 

"Now, then"— As she tied it on 
his finger, mother told him what she 
wanted him to do. 

"And, Peter," she added, "be sure 
to speak very politely when you ask 
it." 

"Yes, I'll remember." 

"I know you always mean to be po- 
lite, dear, but you sometimes forget, 
as all little boys do. Good-by." 

She kissed him, and he hurried 
away, soon joining some other boys 
on the way to school. 

"What's that on your finger?" ask- 
ed one of them. 

"Oh, that's because I have an er- 
rand to do so as to make me think 
of it." 

But as he gazed at it, what was 
the errand, anyhow? In his interest 
in watching the string tied on, he 
(mother had been saying, and now 
the most he could remember of it 
was that he was to be very, very po- 
lite. 

"I can do that, anyway — to every- 
body. And, perhaps, if I go it all the 
time, I shall get to thinking of the 
terrand — Oh, please excuse me, I 
didn't mean to." 

In his hard thinking he had run 
against a big girl as he was turning 
into the school yard. 

"Peter," said she, "you're such a 
polite little fellow that it's easy to 
excuse you." 

"A good thing to say of a boy," 
said one of the teachers, who was 
passing in. "Keep it up, Peter, 
Good manners are a great help to a 
boy in going through life." 

"If they'll only help me to remem- 
ber that errand," said Peter to him- 
self. 

He did remember the politeness. 
He stood up to give a girl his seat 
on a crowded recitation bench. He 
said his best "please" and "thank 
you" when he went to the teacher's 
desk to ask about an example, all 
the while thinking. 

• "If I'm very polite, p'rhaps I shall 
think of the errand." 

At the close of school the teacher 
said: "Who will carry a book with 
its marked lesson around to Johnny 
Park's house? He is sick and could 
not come to school today." 

"I will," said Peter, rising in his 
seat as he spoke. 

"Thank you, Peter. I might have 
known you are just that kind of a 
boy." 

He had to go several blocks out of 
his way to do it. No remembrance 
of his errand came into his head as 
he left the book at the door, with a 



a jar will never become an oak. And 
polite inquiry about Johnny, and he 
walked on slowly, doing his best 

He passed a yard in which were 
many beautiful flowers. A lady was 
inside whom Peter had sometimes 
seen talking with his mother, so he 
raised his hat to her, with a very 
polite little bow. She smiled at him, 
and then said: 

"I wonder if I couldn't get you to 
do something for me?" 

"Of course, ma'am," said Peter, 
again taking off his hat. "I shall be 
very glad to do it." 

"I am cutting some flowers to send 
to a sick woman," went on the lady. 
"Mrs. Hale told me about her" — 

"Oh, that was it!" Peter flung up 
his hat and capered about for joy. 

"That was what?" asked the lady, 
with a smile. 

"My errand. Mrs. Hale's my moth- 
er, and yau're Mrs. Garde; and my 
mother told me to come here and ask 
vou very politely, if you would let 
her have some of your flowers to take 
to the sick woman. She tied this 
pink string around my finger so I 
wouldn't forget. But I did forget, all 
but the politeness." 

Mrs. Garde laughed as she put a 
wonderful bunch of flowers on Peter's 
arm, saying as she did so: 

"If you hadn't taken off your hat 
so politely, I shouldn't have thought 
of asking you to oblige me." 

"Will you please to excuse me for 
not taking it off to say good-by You 
see, my hands are full. 

"Oh, my dear boy, you did remem- 
ber, didn't you?" said mother, as he 
laid the flowers before her. "We will 
try the string again." 

"Mother," said Peter, gravely, "it 
wasn't the string at all. It was the 
politeness." — Sydney Dayre, in Chris- 
tian Register. 



THE ACORN IN THE JAR 

By Marion Hallowell 

Bobbie and his mother were taking 
a. long walk in the park that after- 
noon. It was Saturday, and Bobbie 
was wishing that every day could be 
a holiday from school. "I just hate 
school anyway," he stoutly declared, 
"and I don't believe it does me any 
good to study the old books and maps 
and things!" 

His mother had scarcely time to 
begin an explanation of the many ben- 
efits of school, when Bobbie ran from 
the path to pick up a handful of 
acorns which had fallen from a great 
oak. They were something new to 
him, and he was full of questions 
about oaks and acorns until they 
reached home. 

"And does a big oak tree grow from 
one of these little acorns?" asked 
Bobbie. 

"Certainly, my dear," said his moth- 
er. "Just as a big man grows from 
a little boy." 

A few days later in cleaning up 
Bobbie's room, his mother came upon 
a small glass jar with one of the 
acorns in it. Nothing else was in the 
jar — just the little acorn, and the cov- 
er tightly fastened on. She asked 
him about it when he came from 
school that night. 

"Well, you see," explained Bobbie, 
carefully, "I want one of those big oak 
trees, like the one in the park, and so 
I put the acorn in the jar where I can 
watch it grow, and where it will be 
safe." 

His mother looked at him thought- 
fully for a moment and then she took 
him in her lap. "That is not the way 
that an oak tree grows from an 
acorn," she said. "It must first be 
planted in the warm earth, and then 
it must have sun and air and rain for 
many years before it will oecome such 
an oak as we saw in the park. That 



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is the law of nature, and an acorn in 
it is just the same with a boy as with 
an acorn." 

"What do you mean?" broke in Bob- 
bie. 

"I mean that the boy must go to 
school and learn many things before 
he can become the right kind of a 
man," answered his mother. "The 
boy has to have the years of school, 
just as the acorn has to have the years 
of warm earth and sunshine and rain. 
In both cases it is the law of nature 
and there is no other way. Do you 
understand?" 

"Yes, J think I do," said Bobbie 
slowly. "I never thought before that 
we grow the same way the trees and 
plants do. I suppose if I didn't study 
and learn things I would always be 
like a little boy, and not know things 
like father." 

The next morning he carefully 
planted his acorn in a sunny corner 
of the garden, and then whistled 
cheerfully as he started off to school. 
— Youth's Companion. 



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Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON IV— 
JANUARY 28, 1912 

The Presentation in the TempZe. 
Luke 2:22-39 

Golden Text — For mine eyes have 
seen thy savation, Which thou hast 
prepared before the face of all peo- 
ples. Luke 2:30-31. 

Pi7grims of Hope 

Simeon and Anna belonged to the 
company of those who have a forward 
look. They believed that God was go- 
ing to do great things for Israel. They 
longed lor the commg of the days of 
which they areamed. Other men and 
women knew about the Messianic 
hope. Simeon and Anna lived in the 
light of it. 

There is comething very beautiful 
in the thought of these two old people 
with their eyes bent on the future. 
It is the native of age t > look back- 
ward. The man of dim fyes and wav- 
ering voice and tottering step remem- 
bers the days long ago, when he was 
younir and strong, c ; ear-sighted, vig- 
orous -voircd pnd frm cf step. The 
old J:iys have the halo of tender mem- 
ory thrown about tl.om. The future is 
strange and unknown. 1c is in the 
past that an old man feel? at home. 

Bur, it was not so with Simeon. The 
thought of the great Coming One, who 
was to transform the life of Israel: 
had tilled his mind and heart. Years-- 
had passed. They were hard, sterile 
y> :u"s. v.'ith no s- gns of the great con- 
summation, but Simeon >-pt his hope 
He held ir close to his i f f rt He re- 
fused to give it up. At length a great 
conviction came to him. He ■would 
not tiie until he saw the Messiah. So 
he waited and watched and grew old 
and cherished his great hope. 

There are many people to whom 
life is a pilgrimage of hope. They 
are not contented with things as they 
are. They dream of great days to 
come. They believe in their dreams. 
They live in the light of them. Yet 
they know that before their hopes 
become facts great leaders must arise. 
These pilgrims of hope have the gift 
of loyalty, but they have not the gift 
of leadership. When the man of des- 
tiny does arrive, he never comes to a 
world unprepared for him. He al- 
ways finds quiet men and women who 
are waiting. These men and women, 
who enshrine great dreams in their 
hearts, are a very hopeful part of the 
life of the world. 

The Day of Consummation 

One day a bent old man entered the 
temple. He found there a man and 
a woman and a littue child. It was 
borne in upon him that this was the 
Child of his dreams and" his hopes 
this was the Messiah whom the proph- 
ets had foretold. The Babe in its 
mother's arms seemed a small object 
for such great issues to hang upon 
the Child but in simple, believing 
faith Simeon looked upon the Child 
and saw far more than the small face 
and hands and feet held in the shelter 
of a mother's love. He saw Israel 
feeling the power of this new life, 
He saw great and world-moving events 
coming majestically out of the future. 
His heart was filled with joy. Having 
looked into the promised land, he was 
ready to go away and be at rest. 

Anna, the prophetess, shared the 
gladness of Simeon. With far-seeing 
eyes they recognized the future of 
the Child and gave thanks to God, 
who had permtited them to live unto 
this day. 

Simeon and Anna never heard any 
of the great discourses of Jesus. They 
were not present when the mighty 
and simple words of His teaching fell 
from His lips. They did not witness 
any of the miracles which caused all 
Israel to wonder. They did not see 
the unfolding of that radiant and spot 
less life, which was to capture the 



mind and heart of the wide world. 
Long before Jesus had grown to man- 
hood, before a miracle had been 
wrought or a great discourse spoken, 
before that life had expanded into its 
full-orbed, perfect strength, Simeon 
and Anna had been laid away to rest. 
They had watched through the last 
hours of the night and with the bright 
streaks of dawn flashing over the sky 
the watch and life had ended togeth- 
er. They died with the morning light 
shining in their faces, and they were 
contented to have it so. 

A Light to the Gentiles 

The words which Simeon spoke as 
he held the Child Jesus in his arms 
were like the life of Simeon. They 
were words which looked to the fu- 
ture. It is not strange that he fore- 
saw the glory of Israel. Every pious 
Jew knew that the Messiah was to 
have to do with Israel's glory, but 
when he speaks of a light to Gentiles 
we feel that we are not just moving 
in ordinary channels of Jewish 
thought. The Messiah in whom Sim- 
eon believed was more than a Mes- 
siah for the Jews. He was a Messiah 
for the world. 

It is evident that Simeon had read 
the Jewish Scriptures with deep and 
sympathetic understanding. He had 
meditated over those psalms which 
paid tribute to the wide influence of 
the Coming One. He had brooded 
over those prophecies which foretold 
a world-wide ministry for the Mes- 
siah. 

So it was not merely as a Jew that 
Simeon was glad because a great 
blessing had come to the Jewish race. 
It was as a man that he rejoiced be- 
cause a great blessing had come to 
humanity. 

This Child belonged to Israel. All 
the deep meaning of Hebrew life was 
to flow into his life and ministry. 
The whole past of Israel was a pre- 
paration for Him, but He also belong- 
ed to the world. His light could not 
be confined within Jewish borders. It 
would shine out and out, until its 
brightness had illuminated the whole 
world. It is good to remember Sim 
eon holding the little Child in his 
arms and thinking of the nations to 
whom He was to minister. 

The men and women who enter with 
ieepest sympathy into the Christian 
thought of life will always share with 
Simeon the world-wide vision. The 
] ight of Christ shines on their own 
'ives, on the life of their city and na- 
tion, but it also shines out over the 
world. He is the Light of the nations 
and the nations, rejoicing in a com 
mon illumination, are to be drawn to 
gether into a new brotherhood. 

The Piercing Sword 

There is evidence that Simeon had 
entered even more deeply than we 
have yet seen into the moral and 
spiritual meaning of the Old Testa 
ment. He had read the fifty-third 
chapter of the book of Isiah. He 
had gone back to it again and again. 
At last he had come to some sense of 
its meaning. The Messiah was to be 
a great sufferer. He was to be a 
"man of sorrows and acquainted with 
>?rief." In some deep and terrible way 
He was to bear the burdens of the 
sins of men. The life of Simeon had 
come to new depths as he contemplat 
ed this moral ministry of the Mes 
siah. 

Now as he looked at the Child and 
the uplifted face of the noble mother 
a sudden flash of sympathy for her 
came into his heart. She was a wo- 
man of great privilege, but she was 
to be a woman of great suffering as 
well. Simeon spoke a few solemn, 
tender words about the Messiah's 
work, with a suggestion of the suf- 
fering which must come to Mary. 
When the days of tragedy came she 
must remember that this suffering 
which was hers was a part of the 
great divine plan. The mother of 
the Messiah in some human way must 
share the woe of the Messiah. 

So across the infancy of Jesus fell 
the shadow of the great tragedy to 
come. Tt was the price of the moral 



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Free Catalogue. Agents Wanted Everywhere 



ftllDCn NO CURE NO PAY— lO 

vUnCII o.iier wurcl.- >ou do not 
) pay our small professional fee 
until cured andsatisfled. German* 

l*\m*rlean Inct !*■■•*. A84 Grand Avm.. Kan*.** City. Ma* 

Don't Wear a Truss 

mp p STUART'S PLAS-TR PADS 

kL npt» >TT< Jrowihetruss, belug mtdiciuc appll- 
rT H fc ""^\SP Ailfc^—oalorsmadeeelfadheslve purposely 
1 U^"""ii? hold the parts seourely In place. 

W^TuMt " i*?v& INosirap , bucklesor springs— flan. 
r .«C»iKf- kSizJ lootslip.soeann tcbafeorcomprpsa 
fj» .alnst tbe publo lioue. The most 
obstinate oa-es cured. Thousand! 

have successfully treated themselves 

, at home without hindrance f-om worlt. Soft asvel- 
SEPTlX I vet— easy to apply-ln.ipenslve, Awarded Gold 

aV I Medal. rrdoflsaorreoorerT Is natural, so no rotine* 

^t^^* 01 I use fir iruis. We prove what we say by send. 

IWALorpLAPAo Sfeiw 

Addref.— I'LifAO LAB0&AT0B1ES. Block 132 St Louis. Ho. 



January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SECRETARY'S 
REGISTER 



The best record book on the 
market for the small and medi 
urn-sized Sunday school. 

Simple and easy to understand 
and keep. 

Neat and substantially bound, 
leather back, cloth sides. 

Inside printed on good white 
bond paper In black ink. 

The one year book 1b divided 
into five sections, viz.: Four 
full sections, containing 28 pages, 
and one section of 8 pages. 

Each one of the 28-page sec- 
tions Is devoted to one quarter, 
two pages for each of the thir- 
teen Sundays, and two for the 
Quarterly Report. Each report 
consists of two pages, one for 
statistical report, one for finan- 
cial. These are facing pages. 

The 8-page section, which 
comes last, has two facing pages 
for yearly report, statistical and 
financial; the remainder is de- 
voted to cash account. 

The two-year book consists of 
two one-year books in one bind- 
ing. 

PRICES: 

One Year Book - - $1-00 
Two Year Book - - 1-50 

POSTPAID 

^he Jldvocate 'Press 

Greensboro, N. C. 



USauetfs Extracts 



Impart the dellcionslT frajrant 
flavor of Fresh Ripe Fruits and 
Berries. Bust hougekaepera and 
professional Caterers use oaly 
"Sauers." All flavors. At prrocers 
■10c. ft 25c. Write for our booklet of 
choice cooking receipts— free. 
Sauer's extract Co., Richmond, Va 




WE WANT 

to help every person striv- 
ing for a musical education 
to secure an artistic piano. 
For that reason we open 
our own warerooms and 
sell direct to the home, 
thus eliminating all in- 
between profits. 

Write STIEFF if you are thinking 
of buying 

SOUTHERN WAREROOM 

5 West Trade St. 
Charlotte, - - - - i N. C. 
C. H. WILMOTH, Manager 




Editor of League Columns 

Miss Blanche Johnson 
■'.5 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 



DORMITORY FUND 

Yeviously reported $1,090.00 

adies' Aid Society Franklin- 
ville 25.00 

.^otal reported to date $1,115.00 



THE CABINET MEETING 

Before this issue of the Advocate 
reaches the Leaguers, the Conference 
Cabinet will have met in Statesville, 
>T. C, to plan a program for the next 
neeting of the Western North Caro- 
lina League Conference. Our next is- 
sue will contain further reference to 
this important meeting. . 



ATTENTION, LEAGUERS 

Wte are receiving very few com- 
nunications from the Leagues. We 
would be glad to hear from the Presi- 
dent and the four Vice-Presidents of 
avery League in the Conference. We 
TOuld be glad to have Secretaries and 
reporters write us often. We want 
:ive, up-to-date news of the work being 
done in our own Leagues, it is prefer- 
able to reprinted matter about those 
in other Conferences. 



The pastor of Ramseur church sends 
the following gratifying report of 
League work at that place: 

"Let me say for Ramseur that our 
League is doing fine work and devel 
oping some good, gritty Church work 
ers. "It takes grace, grit and green- 
back to run a church' said Sam Jones 
The League helps our young people 
to grow in grace and grit and to give 
the greenback. That is all good. 

Our Literature department is now 
doing splendid work, studying the 
Discipline. And how we Methodists 
need to know a little about this little 
book. A young lady enquired of me, 
'Have you got one of the new Discip- 
lines to sell?' 'No,' I was sorry to say. 
'Well I must see our Presiding Elder 
and get one,' she said. I was rumi- 
nating in my mind what she meant. 
Was she wanting to get up on the 
Marriage Ceremony? But no, I see, 
she wants a Discipline for her League 
work. It is a good thing for us when 
our young people ask for the Discip- 
line and for the Epworth Era and for 
the N. C. Advocate spontaneously. 

Our Ladies Aid society at Franklin- 
ville, who have a Light Bearer's 
society that they think too much of 
to transform into a Junior League, 
were so favorably impressed with the 
League's effort to build a dormitory 
at the Children's Home that they de- 
cided to give twenty-five dollars to 
that cause and they paid it right 
down. Rally to the rescue, Leaguers, 
reinforcements are coming in on this 
side and that." 



BIBLE CLASS AT ST. JOHN'S, AT- 
LANTA. 

The following report of a Bible class 
organized in an Atlanta, Ga. Church is 
copied from the Era, and the example 
might be followed in a number of 
Leagues where some special line of 
work is needed. Such classes with 
capable leaders, are always more in- 
teresting and helpful in reality than 
can be anticipated. 

"St. John Epworth League of At- 



lanta, Ga., organized several weeks 
ago a Bible class with seventeen mem- 
bers, which is known as the "Quiet 
Hour Bible Class." The course is 
studies of the Old Testament. We 
have a leader, an assistant leader and 
a secretary. The assistant takes 
charge of first few minutes, assigned 
to devotional exercises. The secre- 
tary notifies those that are not pres- 
ent that we missed them, of what we 
did, what we will do next time, and 
what the next lesson is. In this way 
we try to interest each member of the 
class those that come to the class 
and those that do not. Those that 
come find the course is very interest- 
ing and are very free to discuss each 
question that comes before the class. 

We meet every Thursday night from 
seven to eight o'clock. We try to be- 
gin and close on time, but sometimes 
we are so interested that we run over 
the time." 



BISHOP HOSS AND THE EPWORTH 
LEAGUE 

A pastor, commenting on the ses- 
sion of the Western North Carolina 
Annual Conference held in Statesville 
last November, and speaking particu- 
larly of Bishop Hoss' attitude toward 
the League says: 

"At our late Conference, Bishop 
Hoss enquired frequently about the 
League in different charges. When 
the report came monotonously, 'No 
League', 'We can't run a League 
there', etc., Bishop Hoss rose up in 
che dignity and majesty of his splen- 
did manhood and said in words that 
should be heard from one end of our 
Conference to the other, and in tones 
:hat should thrill all hearts: 'Breth- 
ren, the Epworth League is your mix- 
ad up wheel in the Western North Car- 
jlina Conference.' His words and 
cone spoke to us preachers our due re- 
proach. 

"And so reproach is coming to us 
from two sides. From the top side 
where our Bishops preside. And from 
the other side where our young peo- 
ple reside and deride. It was evident 
at our League Assembly last June that 
our young people want to work and 
desire and demand an institution in 
which they can work and exercise 
their youthful powers. I said 'deride' 
and I spoke advisedly; for words of 
derision are being spoken by youth- 
ful lips in reproach to pastors and 
leaders who say "I can't lead the 
League forces. Call a captain from 
another company.' With one accord 
they cry, when you or I dare to say, 
'I can't' There may be some places 
where the League is not wanted, but 
there are places where it is demanded 
with all devotion and modesty. And 
everywhere it is needed for the salva- 
tion and preservation of the young." 

We thank our brother for giving us 
this little glimpse behind the scenes 
as it were, for few if any of our loyal 
band of Leaguers could attend Annual 
Conference. And it is truly refresh- 
ing, in the midst of our struggles, 
(and ofttimes disappointment) to 
maintain the League in the face of 
difficulties that seem almost insur- 
mountable for the one reason that we 
lack trained (or even willing) lead- 
ers to have shown us, thus clearly, 
the attitude of our bishops, as well as 
the best of our pastors. We sincerely 
hope that each League already or- 
ganized will make the best of the op- 
portunity for service that lies before 
it this year, and that many more pas- 
tors and church workers may see the 
way clear to organize and utilize the 
young people of their congregations 
through the Epworth League, the most 
perfect Young People's organization 
in the church. 



Pacuiar After Effects 
ofjr p This Year 

Leave Kidneys in Weakened Condition 

Doctors in all parts of the country 
have been kept busy with the epidem- 
ic of grip which has visited so many 
homes. The symptoms of grip this 
year are very distressing and leave the 
system in a run down condition, par- 
ticularly the kidueys which seem to 
suiter most, as every victim complains 
of lame back and urinary troubles 
which should not be neglected, as 
these danger signals often lead to 
aiore serious sickness, such as dread- 
ed Bright's Disease. Local druggists 
report a large sale of Dr. Kilmer's 
Swamp-Root which so many people 
say soon heals and strengthens the 
kidneys after an mack of grip. 
Swamp-Root is a great kidney, liver 
and bladder remedy, and, being an 
herbal compound, has a gentle healing 
effect on the kidneys, which is almost 
immediately noticed by those who try 
it. Dr. Kiln.er & Co., Binghamton, N. 
Y., offer to send a sample bottle of 
Swamp-Root, free by mail, to every 
sufferer who requests it. A trial will 
convince any one who may be in need 
of it. Regular size bottles 50 cts. and 
$1.00. For sale at all druggists. Be 
sure to mention this paper. 



SHETLAND rONIES 

given to our young 
salesmen. Open to 
boys and girls. None 
over 21 years of age 
to compel e. JOHN A. 
YOUNG & SONS, Nurserymen, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



John White & Co 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Established 1887 
Highest market price paid 

r^FURS 

and HIDES. 
WOOL 

01 COMMISSION 



CHAS. W. MOSELEY, M. D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Qullford Hotel 
Over Farias- Klutz Drug Company 
Qreensboro, N. C. 
Office phone 67! Residence 1848 

Office! 131 8 Elm Street 
Hours: 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

9 m m to f r. m. 



Stomach Troubles 

Vanish 
Like Magi 





to 

Every 
Man 

or 

Woman 




Would you like to eat all you want to, and what 
you want to without having distress in jour 
stomach? 

Would you like to say farewell to Dyspepsia, 
Indigestion, Sour Stomach, Distress after Eat i ng. 
Nervousness, CaSa/rh of the Stomach, Heart 
Fluttering, Sick Headache and Constipation? 

Then send us 10 cents to cover cost of packing 
and we will mail you absolutely free one of th(se> 
wonderful Stomach Drafts. They relieve the 
bowels, remove soreness, strengthen the nerves 
and muscles of the stomach, and snnn make yon 
feel like a new man or woman. Suffer no longer 
but write today enclosing 10 cents for postage, 
etc., and get one of Dr. Young's Peptopads that 
are celebrated because tney hove cured where 
medicines alone failed. Write Dr. 6. C. Young 
<*h,164 Patriot Bldg.. Jackson, Mich, 




ro! 




ero! Page 16 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 25, 1912 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws 
and Regulations in the postofflce In 
Greensboro, N. C, as mall matter of 
the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.50 

Six months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.0u 

per year. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION, (Inc.) 

D. B. Coltrane, President Concord 

Rev. J. R. Scroggs, V-Pres Charlotte 

N. L. Bure, Secretary Greensboro 

W. G. Bradshaw High Poini 

T. C. Hoyle Greensboio 




ASH EVILLE DISTRICT 
D. Atkins, Presiding Elder 
Weaverville, N. C. 

Marshall, Marshall Jan. 27-28 

Hot Springs Jan. 28-29 

Central Feb. 4 

Haywood Feb. 4 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 
J. R. Scroggs, Presiding Elder 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Ansonville, Ansonville Jan. 27-28 

Lilesvllle, Lilesville Jan. 28-29 

Marsh ville, Marshville Feb. 3-4 

Polkton, Polkton Feb. 4-5 

Unionville, Zion Feb. 10-11 

Derita, Derita Feb. 17 

FRANKLIN DISTRICT 
J. E. Gay, Presiding Elder 
Frankin, N. C. 

Andrews Jan. 27-28 

Judson Circuit, at Judson Feb. 3-4 

Murphy Circuit, at Roger's Feb. 10-11 

Murphy Station Feb. 11-12 

Waynesville Circuit, at Bedford's, 

Feb. 17-18 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT 
W. R. Ware, Presiding Elder 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Second Round 
West Greensboro Ct., Friendship, 
_ , Jan. 27-28 

Walnut St., and Car. Memorial, night, 
„ , Jan. 28 

Spring Garden St., 11 a. m Feb. 4 

Pomona Ct., Zion, 3 p. m Feb. 4 

Greensboro, Centenary, 11 a. m., Feb. 11 
E. Greensboro, VVhitsett, 4 p. m., Feb. 11 
Greensboro, West Market St., night, 
„ . Feb. 11 

Reidsville, night Feb. 18 

Ruffln Ct., Lowe's Feb. 18-19 

Wentworth, Mt. Carmel Feb. 24-25 

Randlenian and N. Naomi March 2-3 

Uwharrie, Mt. Shepherd March 9-10 

Denton, m Clarksburg March 16-17 

Coleridge March 23-24 

Ramseur and Franklinville, Ramseur, 
_ . March 23-25 

Randolph Ct., Pleasant Hill, March 30-31 

Asheboro Ct., West Bend April 6-7 

Asheboro Station, at night .. April 7-8 
Pleasant Garden Ct., Pleasant Garden, 

April 13-14 

Liberty Ct., Old Randolph.. April 14-15 



MORGANTON DISTRICT 
R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
Spruce Pine, at Mt. Vernon ..Jan. 27-28 

Table Rock, at Oak Hill Feb. 3-9 

Morganton Station, at night ..Feb. 2-4 
Morganton Circuit, at Gilboa, Feb. 10-11 
Connelly Springs and Rutherford Col- 
lege, at Harmony, Feb. 17-18 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT 
R. M. Taylor, Presiding Elder 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Second Round 

Stokesdale Feb. 10-11 

Walnut Cove, Pine Hall Feb. 17-18 

Madison and Mayodan Feb. 18-19 

Rural Hall Feb. 24-25 

Danbury March 2-3 

Summerfield, Lee's Chapel March 9-10 

Mt. Airy Circuit, Epworth ..March 16-17 

Mt. Airy Station March 1S-19 

East Bend, Mt. Pleasant March 23-24 

Yadkinville, Yadkinville March 24-25 

Dobson. Pleasant Ridge March 30-31 

Jonesville April 6-7 

Elkin April 7-8 

Pilot Mountain April 13-14 

Stoneville April 20-21 

Spray and Draper April 27-28 

Leaksvllle April 28-29 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 
M. H. Vestal, Presiding Elder 
North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

North Wilkesboro Station Jan. 28-29 

Wilkesboro Station Feb. 4-5 



SALISBURY DISTRICT 
J. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Woodleaf Circuit, Woodleaf Jan. 27-28 

Mount Pleasant, at Mount Pleasant, 

Feb. 3-4 

Salem Feb. 10-11 

New London at New London ..Feb. 17-18 




FREE j 

j CONCERT j 

I COUPON i 

; ; 

! Mk. Edison Dealer : ■ 

■ ° 

■ Please treat bearer j 

i and friends to a Free ! 

, ■ 

; Concert on the \ 

j Edison Phonograph | 




Tear out this Free Concert Coupon, present it to the 
Edison dealer nearest you and get a Free Concert on 

The Edison Phonograph 

Take your family and friends with you 



Read through the list of dealers below, find the 
one nearest you, present this coupon and hear the 
most wonderful concert you have ever heard in all 
your life. You can select your own program. Take 
your family and friends with you, so that each can 
select the particular kind of music or other enter- 
tainment he or she prefers. 

You may prefer band or orchestra music, some 
member of your family may prefer songs, the good 
old ballads and quartettes, another may love sacred 
music and another, airs from the great operas. The 
wonderful Edison Phonograph renders them all — 
as this concert will show you. 

And this concert will also make you wonder why 



your home has been without the Edison Phono- 
graph so long — for 

There is an Edison Phonograph easily 
within the means of everyone, from 
the Gem at $15 to the Amberola at $200. 

The Edison dealer will arrange terms that will suit your conven- 
ience. And then you can have a concert like this right in your own 
home every day and every night, whenever you want it Tear off 
the coupon — and be sure to take your 
family and friends with you when you go. 

If one of our dealers is not located 
conveniently near you, write us for illus- 
trated catalog, list of 2000 Records and 
full in formation about the genuine Edison 
Phonograph. 

Dealers with established stores wanted in towns where we are 
not now represented 



INCORPORATED 

149 Lakeside Avenue 
Orange, N. J. 



NORTH CAROLINA DEALERS 



Albermarle-P. J. Honeycutt & Co. 
Almond— ll. G. Coffey 
Asheville — H. A Duuham 
Asuevilie — U. Taylor Kugers 
Aurora— J. D. Pate 
Beaufort— John M. Wolfe 
Brevard-Southem Stock & Farm- 
ing (Jo. 
Bryson Ciij — J . U. Dorsey 
Burliugtou— J. Stewart, Jr. 
Cautou— Uautou Supply (Jo. 
Cedar iiruVe-Hugb.es Auderson 
Chailotte — V. H. Andrews 
Cherryvilie— Dr. R. J. Morrison 
Claytou — Ulaj tou Buggy & l f urni_ 

ture Co 
Clvde— J. VV. Morgan 
Concorj— Bell & Harris Furn. Co. 
Durham — VV. R. .Murray Co. 
Durham— H. A. Uaskius 
Elizabeth City— P. DeLon 



Elkin— Reich -Walsh Furn. Co. 
Enfleiu — Parke Bros. 
E.astus — Alfred C. Watson 
Fayettevilie— W. T. sauuders 
Fj an kliutou— Cooke Film. Co. 
Golilsooro— urauger & Htues 
GraUam — Green & McCiure 
Greensiioro — the Prince Co. 
Heweiis — N. C. Talc <& MiulugCo. 
High Poiiu— People's Furu. Co. 
John Station — icotlaud oup. Co. 
Jouesuoro — IS. P. Suipes 
Kenli — il. Watson & Bros. 
Kiugs Mountain— il. T. Fulton 
Kiiiston — Kmstou Cycle Co. 
Lenoir — tterutiart rieagieHdware 

& Furniture Co. 
Lincoluioii — S. P. Ilouser 
Louisburg- W. E. White Furn. Co. 
Lumberton-Engle K r. & Opt. Co. 
Lyun — Tryon Hosier Co. 



Macon— J. T. Haithcock & Co. 
Marion— C. R. McCall 
Marshville— J . C. Marsh & Co. 
Marshville— Mar.shville Fur. Co. 
Monroe— 1". P. Dillon 
Morganton — Lazai us Brothers 
Moiganiou — Mace & Miller 
Mt. Airy— F. L. smith Hdw. Co. 
Mt. Gtlead — liruton & Co. , Inc. 
Niiwberu— W. T, Hill 
North YVilke-boro — J. E. Deans 
Oxtb'd— S. O. Parham 
Piuuacle--Spainhour * Flynn 
Plymouth — 0. It. Legg«lt 
Red Spjing-- — O. E. Shook 
Reidsvill. — John C. Morrison 
Koauoke Rapids— VV. G. Lynch 
Rockingham — VV. E. McNair 
Rock Mount— Geo. F. Harrell 
Roxboro— VV. H. B. Newell 



Rutherfordton-Thompson & Wat- 
kins 

Selma — Robert E. Snipes 
Southern Pines — Bernard Leavitt 
Spray — 1. K. Gray & Son 
Statesville-Crawford-Bunch Fur. 
Co. 

Sylva— Sylva Supply Co. 
Warrenton — Thos. A. shearin 
Warsaw — i >. V\". Heiring 
Washington— W. H. Ku.-s&Co. 
Waynesville — Waynesville Book 
Co. 

Weldon — Spiers Brothers 
Williauislon — H. D. Peele 
Willow Springs — \j. D. Adams 
Wilmington— C. H. Keen & Co. 
Wil-on — Wilson Drug Co. 
Winston-saleni — R. J. Bowen & 
Bros. 

Winston-Salem— Dixie Music Co. 



SHELBY DISTRICT 
S. B. Turrentlne, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

South Fork, Plateau Jan. 27-28 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT 
Lee T. Mann, Presiding Elder 
Lenoir, N. C. 
First Round 

Lenoir Ct., South Lenoir Jan. 27-28 

Lenoir Jan. 2S-2M 

Whitnel, Whitnel, 3 p. m Jan. 28-29 

.Vtooresville Ct., Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Davidson Feb. 4-5 

Mooresville Feb. 11-12 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT 
L. T. Cordell, Presiding Elder 
Waynesville, N. C. 
First Round 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Jan. 27-28 

Mill River, Avery's Creek Feb. 3-4 

Fines Creek, Fines Creek Feb. 10-11 

Brevard Circuit, Rosman Feb. 17-18 

Brevard Station Feb. 24-25 



WINSTON DISTRICT 
Plato Durham, Presiding Elder 
Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

Lewisville, Sharon Jan. 27-28 

Grace Jan. 28-29 

Davie, Hardison Feb. 3-4 

Mocksvllle Feb. 4-5 

Cooleemee Feb. 4-5 

Kernersville, Kernersville Feb. 10-11 

Southslde and Salem. Salem Feb. 11 

Second Round 

Centenary Feb. IS 

West End Feb. 18 

Thomasville Ct., Fair Grove.. Feb. 24-25 

Thomasville Feb. 25-26 

Walkertown March 2-3 

Burkhead March 3 

Forsyth Ct., Shiloah March 9-10 

Jackson Hill, Jackson Hill ..March 16-17 
Farmington, Smith's Grove.. March 23-24 

Advance March 24-25 

Linwood Ct., March 30-31 

Lexington March 31, April 1 



Take Foley Kidney Pills 

TONIC IN ACTION - QUICK IN RESULTS 

Get rid of your Deadly Kidney 
Ailments, that cost you a high price 
in endurance of pain, loss of time and 
money. Others have cured themselves of 
KIDNEY AND BLADDER DISEASES 
by the prompt and timely use of FOLEY 
KIDNEY PILLS. Stops BACKACHE, 
HEADACHE, and ALL the many other 
troubles that followDISEASEDKIDNEYS 
and URINARY IRREGULARITIES. 
FOLEY KIDNEY PILLS will CURE any 
case of KIDNEY and BLADDER TROUB- 
LE not beyond the reach of medicine. No 
medicine can do more. Sold by all dealers. 



THE THIRD ANNUAL NEGRO STATE 
FARMERS' WEEK WILL BE HELD AT 
THE AGRICULTURAL & MECHANI- 
ICAL COLLEGE FOR THE COLORED 
RACE, GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRU- 
ARY 12--17, 1912 

Colored farmers of the state will be 
given the unusual opporunity this year 
of being in school for an entire week 
and being instructed by experts from the 
State Department of Agriculture, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. ; and the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. 
C. One whole day will be devoted to 
"seed corn" and will be in charge of 
Mr. C. R. Hudson, State Agent, in charge 
of the Farmers' Co-operative Demonstra- 
tion Work. Bring along a sample of 
your "Seed Corn." On February 17th a 
demonstration in Sub-soiling by Dyna- 
mite will be given. 

No tuition will be charged and farmers 
will be entertained free while here. We 
will be glad to have you and your friends 
with us the whole week. 

For further Information address 

Director Department of Agriculture and 
Chemistry, 

A. &. College, Greensboro, N. C. 



RHEUMATISM 



Dr. Whitehall's 



For 15 years a Standard Remedy for 
all forms of Rheumatism, lumbago, 
gout, sore muscles, stiff or swollen 
joints. It quickly relieves the severe 
pains; reduces the fever, and eliminates 
the poison from the system. 50 cents 
a box at druggists. 

Write for a Free Trial Box 
Dr. Whitehali Megrimine Co. 

'50 S. Lafayette St. South Bend, Ind. 



WOMAN'S GREATEST TROUBLE. 

Big Sandy, Tenn. — Mrs. Lucy Can- 
trell, of this place, says: "Every two 
weeks, I had to go to bed and stay 
there several days. I suffered untold 
misery. Nothing seemed to help me, 
until I tried Qardui, the woman's 
tonic. Although I had been afflicted 
with womanly weaknesses for seven 
years, Cardui helped me more than 
anything else ever did. It is surely 
the best tonic for women on earth." 
Weakness is woman's greatest trouble. 
Cardui is woman's greatest medicine, 
because it overcomes that weakness 
and brings back strength. In the past 
50 years, Cardui helped over a million 
women. Try it for your troubles, to- 
day. 

EPWORTH PIANOS 

A IJtf"} Oftf* A M ^ fnr ' lomes fin<1 charchoi, font on 
vAU/liiJ approval. Factory pricei ana easy 
terms- Send fur free catalog State which — piano or orran. 
WILLIAMS PIANO fc OROAN CO.. D«sk E. CHICAOO- 



January 25, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 




A TRIBUTE OF LOVE 

"She hath gone in the spring-time of 
life, 

From the lovely who loved her tcu. 
well; 

Like a dream of the night her swee. 
spirit 

Hath flown from this world of unres 
To repose on the bosom of God." 

A memorial service was held in th 
Methodist church of Jefferson, N. C. 
Sunday, January 7, in memory of Mrt 
Walter Gentry, daughter of the lau 
Capt. Todd. 

She was first taken sick last March. 
Her husband and friends did all tia. 
kind, loving hands could for her com- 
fort. 

Last fall by the advice of attending 
physician, she was taken to Asheville 
for an operation. The doctors there 
decided she was too weak for an oper- 
ation so her husband started back 
home, and stopped off at Greensboro 
for a few days. Here on October 15, 
1911 the spirit of the saintly woman, 
who for twenty years was a faithful 
member of the Methodist church, took 
its flight to the Father above. 

She leaves behind to mourn her loss 
a husband and three little children, a 
girl and two boys, also two sisters, 
one living in Greensboro and the other 
in Virginia. 

The service was in charge of the 
writer and Prof. Plummer, Mrs. Logan 
at the organ. 

"We love to think of the loved ones 
over there, 
Who before us the journey have 
trod; 

Of ihe songs that they breathe on the 
air 

In their home in the palace of God." 
Geo. W. Everett, Pastor. 



ELIZABETH CATHARINE SHU- 
FORD 

It is true that whatever we sow in 
this life that shall we also reap. If 
it be kind assistance, thougntfui relief, 
helpful deeus, that is what we may ex- 
pect to have m return. Uhe leading 
expression which was on tae lips of 
Sister anuford during her last inuess 
was, "Everybody is so good to me." 
Everywhere she went, all wno toucned 
her life, felt the sunsnine radiating 
from her sweet and cheerful spirit. 
Her faith was of the most childlike 
simplicity. 

Elizabeth Catharine Robb was born 
in Iredell county, May 21, 1838. On 
November 17, 1S57, she was married 
to James Monroe Shuford. To this 
union were born six children, J. E. 
and T. W. Shuford, of Fairview, N. 
C. Carl Shuford, of Asheville, N. C, 
R. E. Shuford, of Biltmore, N. C, and 
Henry Shuford and Mrs. Minnie Young 
of Swannanoa, N. C. She was an af- 
fectionate wife, devoted to her children 
and loyal to the Methodist church 
which she joined when but a girl. 

Their home was at Fairveiw but af- 
ter the death of her husband, she lived 
with her daughter, Mrs. Young. It 
was here as elsewhere she had been, 
that she won to herself a large circle 
of friends, whose lives were enriched 
and ennobled from their association 
with so godly a woman. 

For more than a year she had been 
an invalid, but the God of her youth 
was the strength of her old age. She 
bore all her suffering with patience 
and Christian fortitude. It was on 
the 5th of October, 1911, that the Death 
Angel passing by, summoned her, and 



though regretting to leave ber loved 
ones, she gladly went to join her hus- 
band and forever be with her Lord. 
The burial was at Fairview. 

We hope and pray that each one of 
the children will make the necsesary 
preparation, that when they depart 
from this life, they will join their 
parents and form an unbroken family 
ircle. 

Oh! how sweet it will be in that 

beautiful land, 
:o free from all sorrow and pain, 
Yith ( songs on our lips and harps in 

our hands, 
^o meet one another again." 

R. F. Honeycutt. 



HOW CHRIST GIEVES PEACE 

In the midst of the noisy world's 
lamors, crying off its miserable 
.'rauds, there stands one majestic per- 
sonage who with a divine calmness 
utters the deep loving offer, "My peace 
I give unto you; not as the world 
giveth, give I unto you." Christ's 
method is the opposite of the world's 
and of the father of lies. Christ gives 
peace by healing the diseases of the 
soul. Instead of the wretched device 
of attempting to satisfy restless and 
unholy cravings, He expels them and 
brings in the new sources of joy. The 
world's false peace begins in delusion, 
goes on in sin, and ends in perdition. 
Christ's peace begins in pardoning 
grace, goes on in quiet trust, and ends 
in glory. — Dr. Cuyler. 

THE LAST DOUBT REMOVED 

Hundreds of thousands have had the 
last doubt removed by reading Mahaf- 
fey's book on Baptism. It proves from 
the only Bible St. Paul ever owned 
that sprinkling was the original mode. 
Plain as daylight! It should be placed 
Ln all of our homes. Single copy, 16c; 
$1 a dozen. Write the Mahaffey Co., 
Clinton, S. C, and get a supply at 
once. 



Make Your Money 
Work for You 

Invest your savings ln dlvldent paying 
stocks and bonds. We sell gilt edge se- 
curities, of sound, safe and prospHi-ous 
Banks In North Carolina and South Car- 
olina for cash or EASY PAYMENT 
PLAN. .No speculations, but a reliable 
Investment. We also sell Stnte, County 
and Municipal Bond?, and First Mort- 
gages on improved Real Estate. Full In- 
formation free on request. Write us 
NOW. 

SAVINGS BANK & TRUST COMPANY, 
Bond Dept., Charlotte, N. C. 



WEPAY$80AM0NTH SALARY 

and furnish rig and all expenses to introd-tce our 
gaaranteed stock and poultry powders; money-back 
guarantee;outf s t fr«»e;nawplan; steady work. Address 
BUGLER CO., X 70S, SPRl*l£FIELt>, ILLINOIS 

The Newest Styles of Jewelr> 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATED WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assort- 
nent of fine Pocket Books, Cut Qlass- 
vare and Ornaments. We are the oldesi 
.eadlng Firm in the city. Everything is 
luaranteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

LEADING JEWELERS 



IDEAL MAIL BOX. 

The best sanitary, approved, 
endorsed mail box manufac- 
tured. New idea, patented. 
Write for sample and Big Free 
Catalogue. Unlimited oppor- 
tunity for agents. 
OHIO VALLEY NOVELTY CO , 
226 First Street, Lexington. Ky. 




PISO'S REMEDY 



FOR C.OUGHS AND COLDS 



ROISTER FERTILIZER 

HITS THE SPOT EVERY HM 

■ t SR. > 



The explanation is simple; 
they are made with the great- 
est care and every ingred- 
ient has to pass the test 



theres no hit ormiss"about 
Royster Fertilizers. 

Sold By Reliable Dealers Everywhere 
F.S.ROYSTEH GUANO CO, 

SALES OFFICES 

Norfolk.Va. Tarboro.N.C. CoIumbia.S.C. 
Baltimore, Md. Montgomery, Ala. Spartanburg, S.C. 
Macon, Ga. Columbus, Ga. 




FROST PROOF CABBAGE PLANTS 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY CUSTOMERS 

FROM THE ORIGINAL CABBAGE PLANT GROWERS 



l\ EARLY JERSEY WAKEFIELD.. CHARLEST IN LARGE TYPE. SUCCESSION. 
l\ The Earliest ■ "WAKEFIELD, The Earlieit 

| \^ Cabbage Grown. 2d Earliest. Flat Head Varict- 



AUGUSTA TRUCKER,. 
Cban Succession, 



SHOItT STEMMED 
FLAT DUTCH. 
Largest and Latest Cabbage. 



TRADEMARK COPYRIGHTED 




Established 1868. Paid in Capital Stock $30,000.00 ***BT 

We! grew the first FROST PROOF PLANTS in 1868. Now have over twenty thousand satisfied 
customers. We have prown and soid more enhbnge plants than all oth*r persons in the Southern 
States combined. WHY? Because our plants roust please or wesend yourmoney back. Order now: 
It is time to set these plants in your section to get extra early cabbagx-, and they are the ones 
that sell for the most money. 

Wa sow three tons cf Cabbage Seed per season i^T^T^l 

Fruit trees and ornamentals. Write for free catalog- containing valuable information about fruit 
and vegetable growine:. Prices on Cabbage Plants:— By mail Postage Paid 46 cc nts p^r 100 plants. 
By eynress, buvrr paving- express charges, which under special rate is verv low: SUO tor Si. 00; 1,000 
to 1,000 $1.60 per thousand; 6,000 to 9,000 $1.25 per thousand; 10,000 and over $1.(0 per thousand. 

Wm. C. Geraty Co., Box 67, Yonges Island. S. C. 



a new Song Book in your Church 
or Sunday School, and one for 
every person ; "FAMILIAR SONGS 

OF THE GOSPEL," Round or Shape Notes, for $3 for 100. Words and music, 83 verv best 
= .>,-• Sample rr. D v 5 cents. E. A. K. HACKETT 14 North Wayne Street. Fort Wavne InrJ, 




Hardwood Mantels 

THAT PLEASE 

Grates and Tiles 

THAT HARMONIZE 



Get Our Catalogue. Free to 
those who are interested. 



Odell Mantel Co., 

(Owned by Ode!! Hardware Co.) 
GREENSBORO. - - - N. C, 




The Hero Advertisement 

Page Sixteen 



Page Sixteen 



January 25, 1912 



OLD BIBLE AND FAMILY PRAYER 

The old book Is a thing of the 
world's heart life. Infidelity can never 
never sodden completely our spiritual 
sense nor pull down to earth life's 
ideal so long as the memories of fami- 
ly prayers and the old home Bible live. 
Selfishness can never provide the 
whole program of human activity 
while there abide in men the heaven- 
ly influences of the old book. 

Prophets of pessimism who predict 
a dying out of religion and a resurg- 
ence of unfaith have not measured 
the tenacious hold on men's hearts oi 
these spiritual factors of old home 
life. The Bible is the same old book 
with its old resources of sentiment 
and human interest unimpaired. It 
wears new garments, but it is the old 
unchanged shining truth that holds. 
It has thousands of allies, but its 
strength lies where it has always 
lain. Great journals teach, mighty 
men preach and vast institutions 
achieve marvelous things, but moral 
leaderships rests as it has always 
rested with the old family Bible and 
with the spirituality that lives in the 
heart that secludes itself long enough 
in the turmoil of the great ongoing 
world of affairs to find fellowship with 
God. — Selected. 



THIS WILL INTEREST MANY 

F. W. Parkhurst, the Boston pub- 
lisher, says that if anyone afflicted 
with rheumatism In any form, neural- 
gia or kidney trouble, will send their 
address to him at 701 Carney Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., he will direct them to 
a perfect cure. He has nothing to sell 
or give; only tells you how he was 
cured after years of search for relief. 



PRAISE GOD 



Praise is more than thanksgiving. 
It is different from adoration. Both 
thanksgiving and adoration are in- 
volved in it. It is the expression of 
the soul's appreciation of what God 
is as well as of what He does. 

This appreciation of the character 
and acts of God is more than mere 
feelings of the heart as well as the 
loitiest apprehension by the mind. 
Praise springs from the heart and the 
head. 

It is due as thanksgiving is due. 
We are grateful because we are re- 
cipients of grace. We should be 
praisetul because of the character ot 
the giver. Thanksgiving sees the 
benefit. Praise sees the benefactor. 
It is because God is what He is that we 
have occasion to thank Him tor what 
we receive. — Exchange. 



If it were — if it might be — if it could 
be — if it had been. One portion oi 
mankind goes through life always re- 
gretting, always whining, always im- 
agining, ^.s it is — this is the way in 
which the other class of people look at 
the conditions in which they find 
themselves. I venture to say that it 
one should count the ifs and the ands 
in the conversation of his acquaintan 
ces, he would find the more able and 
important persons among them — states- 
men, generals, men of Dusiness — among 
the ands and the majority of the con- 
spicuous failures among the ifs. — O. 
W. Holmes. 



NEARLY SMOTHERED. 

Chandler, N. C. — Mrs. Augusta Lo- 
max, of this place, writes: "I had 
smothering spells every day, so bad 
that I expected death at any time. I 
could not sit up in bed. I suffered 
from womanly troubles. My nerves 
were unstrung. I had almost given 
up all hope of ever being better. I 
tried Cardui, and it did me more 
good thau anything I had ever taken. 
I am belter now than I ever expected 
to be." Thousands of ladies have 
written similar letters, telling of the 
merits of Cardui. It relieves their 
headache, backache and misery, just 
as it will relieve yours, if you will 
let it Try. 




SEE THE CONQUERING 





HEROES COME 

Thirty strong, the boy Heroes are touring the South, by squads of four, visiting all the 
towns, and calling on the good women of the South to tell the story of Hero, high grade coffee 
and chicory. 

Nearly half a million sample packages are to be given away by the Hero boys. One of 
these Hero Boys should bring you a package of Hero and a little booklet, entitled "The Cup 
that Cheers", which tells how to obtain the best breakfast cup. 



HERO 



COFFEE and 
CHICORY 



t. f 



^OFFEE&CHICORr 



THE ROYAL BEVERAGE (1004, Goodness) 

Hero is made differently from ordinary coffee. It is a superb compound of finest coffee and pure 
chicory, manufactured by a process of our own, involving new methods, modern machinery and 
resulting in the cleanliest, most palatable and most wholesome beverage possible, and yet less 
expensive than most competing brands. 

Hero is More Palatable, because the pure chicory adds to the flavor of the coffee, a 
richness and creaminess impossible in any other than such a compound of coffee and chicory. As New 
Orleans in the New World, and Holland in the Old World gained their great reputations for fine 
coffee by compounding their coffee with chicory, so Hero, just such a compound — only perfected— has 
jumped to the front among the coffees of the country in but three years time, and bids fair to 
make a reputation surpassing that of any other brand. 

Hero is more Wholesome, because chicory is tonic in its effects — 
The National Dispensatory, says "Chicory is thought to increase the appetite, 
promote digestion, and stimulate the liver." And so, when compounded with 
high grade coffee, by our process, produces a beverage which the lover of good 
coffee can drink with the consciousness that his enjoyment of the breakfast 
cup is not injuring his general health, but actually benefitting it. 

Hero is EeSS expensive, because, while the compounding with 
chicory improves the goods both in flavor and wholesomeness, it also reduces 
the cost of manufacture and the saving goes to the consumer in a lower price 
than is commonly charged even for inferior coffees. Here is where science 
and invention come to the help of the consumer and help to reduce the cost 
of living, while at the same time the article is improved in quality. For 
while Hero does not sell as high as some coffees, it takes only half as much 
to make a good strong beverage. 

And What is the Conclusion? Why simply this, that you cannot 
afford to be without Hero another day. Your grocer has Hero, ask him. 




M POTTER SLOANdDOHOHU^O, 
" 1PO0T fe»s » waters of COF*6& 
NEW YORK, USf 



Potter Sloan O'Donobue Company 

13 and 15 OLD SLIP NEW YORK CITY 



Protect Your Horses- 
Care for Them 



They are your most valuable helpers 
and servants. Like the human being it 
they are suffering from pain from any 
cause, they cannot give you their best 
service; neither can they describe to you 
their sufferings, they are dumb brutes, 
but just as sensitive to pain as the hu- 
man beings. Therefore, you should watch 
them and administer to their require- 
ments. 

No stable should ever be without a 
bottle of Yager's Cream Chloroform Lin- 
iment, it is the best all round Liniment 
to be had for general stable use. 

Mr. N. E. Stanly of Columbus, Ohio, 
writes: 

"I have used Yager's Cream Chloro- 
form Liniment on our horses for the 
past three months and have no hesitancy 
in saying I regard it as the best Lini- 
ment on the market today." 

Not only is it the best on the market 
for horses and general use, but it is the 
best and most sure to relieve Liniment 
for man or beast that has ever been of- 
fered to the American public. If you 
will go to your nearest druggist or mer- 
chant and get a bottle for twenty-five 
cents and try it, you will say it is the 
best and recommend it. Get only the 
genuine Yager's made by Gilbert Bros. 
& Co., of Baltimore, Md. 




CAPITAL STOCK, $30,000 
A school with a reputation for doing high-grade work. 

One of the best equipped business schools in the South. THE LARGEST. The strongest 
faculty. MORE GRADUA TES IN POSITIONS than all other business schools in the State. Book- 
keeping. Shorthand and English. No vacation. Write for handsome catalogue, 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE, Raleigh, N. C, or Charlotte, N. C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand. Penmanship, etc.. by mail. Send for Home Study circular 



Helms' Babyoline 

An External Remedy for Old and Young 

For Pneumonia, Bronchitis, Croup, Colds, Whooping Cough, 
Soreness in Chest, and Cold in Head. Physicians 
prescribe it and get best results. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 25c for two-ounce jar 

J. D. HELMS, Manufacturing Chemist 

WINSTON, N. C. 



GREENSBORO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



WHEN YO U NEED A PIANO 

First find the oldest, and most reliable concern in your community handling 
same, then let them assist you in selecting your piano, as the majority of 
the best musicians in this state have done, by telling you what quality of 
piano to buy and what make of piano will give you the best service at the 
price you desire to pay. In this way make us responsible, then you can go 
home and rest assured that you have made the best possible investment 



233 South Elm St. 



A. P. FRAZIER, GENERAL MANAGER 

The Oldest Piano House in the County 



Greensboro, N. C 




Glascock Stove & Mfg. Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Manufacturers 

"Carolina" and "Plymouth" 
Cook Stoves 

The stoves you can always trust. 
Every stove absolutely guaranteed. 
If your dealer does not carry our 
stoves in stock, please write us 
direct for catalog, giving us your 
dealer's name. 



THE TOWNSEND BUGGY CO. 

OUR ENTIRE LINE OF 

VEHICLES AND HARNESS 

AT A GREAT REDUCTION TO MAKE 
ROOM FOR OUR SPRING 
STOCK. 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MINISTERS 



Crescent Cleaning Works 




MRS. C. T. GODWYN, Proprietress 
209 West Market St. GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Huntley-Stockton-Hill Co. 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS 

Day Phone 762 Night Phone 1442 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COME TO THE PLACE 

Where you always get better shoes for less money. 
Ont of the high rent district. 

Corner Market and Davie Streets 

A. E. FORDHAM & CO. 



THE SMITHERMAN CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 



SPECIALTIES: Canned Goods, Coffees, Teas, Bine 
Label are onr Standby's 



309 South Davie St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING & DYE WORKS 

1121-2, 114, 116 Fayetteville St., Greensboro 
Phones 176 and 633 

Genuine French Dry Cleaners and 
Fancy Dyers 



Ont of town orders given prompt attention. Write 
tor booklet and price list. Agents wanted 



Our Spring Style 
Book 

For Spring 1912 will soon 
be ready for mailing. If 
you are not on our list 
send us your name. 

Meyer's 

N. C.'s Largest Department Store 
GREENSBORO, N.C. 



(ommercial Stationer^ 



WE would like to send you our "Samples and Prices of Com- 
mercial Stationery/' In it we show only a few of our 
styles and prices. Should you want something different, drop 
us a line and we will be glad to submit an estimate. Our 
plant is adequately equipped. We can print anything from a 
visiting card to a poster 3x4 feet in size; from an envelope to a 
college annual, and do it well. Give us a chance and we will do 
the rest. ^ Let us show you how well we can handle your work. 



WRITE TODAY TO 



THE ADVOCATE PRESS 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 




The man who is prepared always feels better. If it is to meet a rainstorm or a financial obligation, or even 
Death itself, he feels better if prepared. 

The man in the commercial world does not know just when he will want an accommodation of his banker. 
There might be a bargain offered him on which he could make big money — if he were prepared to handle 
it. Therefore the larger the bank with which you do business, the better the chance to be accommodated. 

THE AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

of GREENSBORO, N. C. 
WITH TOTAL RESOURCES OF MORE THAN 

$2,000.^00.00 

% 

Under Government supervision, and with nothing investt^ ^^-.tocks or real estate or bonds (except United 
States bonds to secure currency circulation) feels that it apj., o the prudent business man. We cordially 
invite you to open an account with us. In our Savings Depar, we pay 4 per cent, compounded quarterly. 
Deposits may be sent by check, Post Office order or registered 1 

American Exchange National Bank 

Greensboro, N. C. 
CAPITAL, $400,000.00 

R. G. VAUGHN, Pres. J. W. SCOTT, Vice-Pres. F. C. BOYLES, Cashier F. H. NICHOLSON, Ass't Cashier 
B ■ — 33 



IB 



TIE THY CAMEL 



One night, in the desert, Mohammed and one of his followers came to an oasis and halted for the night. After 
they dismounted, Mohammed's follower said, 

" I will loose my camel and trust him to Allah." 

" Nay, my friend," replied Mohammed, " Tie thy camel and trust him to Allah." 

You, my friend, who have a family, and for whom you have made no provision after you are gone, let us reason 
together. Have you tied your camel ? Have you protected your family against the calamity of your death by a life 
insurance policy ? If you have not you are no wiser than the follower of Mohammed who loosed his camel and trusted 
him to Allah. 

&f>e 

Southern Life ®. Trust Co. 

of Greensboro, N. C. 



Is the strongest Southern Life Insurance Company ( not writing industrial insurance ) and is the only life insurance 
Company organized in the last twenty years which has been successful enough to go on an annual dividend basis. In 
addition to this, there is no other Company in the Country paying larger dividends to its policy-holders. It is a policy- 
holders' Company and has a surplus for their protection of nearly $600,000.00. 



North Carolina 



Christian Advocate 

ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 



Thursday, February 1, 1912 









HFhere is no doubt that the character of 
4 preaching has undergone a great change, 
and I do not know that I can recall a sin- 
gle instance during the year when 1 heard a 
sermon which in any way reminded me of 
John the Baptist's warning cry: "Flee from 
the wrath to come." In my boyhood, that 
was the note that brought about my conver- 
sion. It is the decay of the emphasis upon 
the exceeding sinfulness of sin that I deplore. 
I rejoice in the gospel of salvation to eternal 
life, but I wish that hearers were reminded 
more frequently of sin and its wages — eternal 
death — that they need to be saved from. 
This aspect of the gospel is largely missing 
from modern preaching. As Dr. Hale once 
said: "No one fears God now." Exactly! 
I think we have got too flabby through em- 
phasizing the fatherhood of God while losing 
sight of His holiness. We seem to speak as 
if God will always look with complacency 
on human sin. The absence of the harder 
note in preaching is not all gain. 

— Montague Holmes. 











The Guilford Range 



These ranges are manufactured for us under our special brand. 
We are exclusive dealers for this section. We have handled a 
great many carloads of these ranges, and believe, without question, 
that they contain the best value on the market. You do not need 
to pay an agent $65.00 or $75.00 for a Range, as a large propor- 
tion of the price goes for profit and selling expense, neither do 
you need to order from a catalogue house a range you have never 
seen. The long distance means delay and extra danger of damage 
in transportation. Later, when you need extra parts, it will be 
very inconvenient and expensive to obtain them, and your local 
merchant can sell you the Guilford Range at a price which will 
give you better value than you can obtain from a catalogue house. 
As a baker, the Guilford has no superior. You cannot buy a 
range which will give you better service, no matter how much you 
pay for it. Those, having city, or private water supply, will find 
it unexcelled as a water heater, owing to the excellent water front. 
It can be furnished with reservoir also, for use where there is no 
water pressure. 

If your dealer does not carry the Guilford, write us for cata- 
logue, and give us his name. We shall be glad to send our hand- 
some stove catalogue, showing not only the Guilford Ranges, but 
stoves, and other useful household articles, to any interested, pro- 
vided this paper is mentioned. 



ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C 



Shall we turn them away, or shall we 
build and take them In— the Methodist 
girls of North Carolina who desire to 
be educated In their own church college? 
At present we are turning them away by 
the score, but we have secured plans 
for a new dormitory ( a picture of which 
adorns this page), which we will build 
as seen as the money can be secured. 

The cost of the dormitory, furnished 
and ready for occupancy, will be $25,000. 
and we hope to secure this amount by 
the following plan: Ten churches and 
ten individuals In each conference build 
a room at a cost of $500.00 each. The re- 
maining $5000.00 to be secured in small 
contributions from a number of people. 

The name of the Individual or church 
building a room will be placed on the 
door of the room so that students may 
know whose generosity thoughtfully pro- 
vided facilities for their education. 

Subscriptions may be made payable if 
desired, In four semi-annual installments. 

Any person who will build a room, or 
is willing to contribute any amount, how- 
ever small, will confer a favor by com- 
municating with W. M. Curtis, Secretary 
and Treasurer, Greensboro, N. C. 

The following have agreed to build a 
room: 

Faculty and Students G. F. C; West 
Market Church, Greensboro, N. C. ; A 
member of West Market Churoh, Greens- 
boro, N. C; First Methodist Church, 
Wilson, N. C; Tryon Street Methodist 
Church, Charlotte, N. C. ; Grace Church, 
Wilmington, N. C; Member of 5th Street 
Church, Wilmington, N. C. ; Member 
Grace Church, Wilmington, N. C; Mem- 
ber Methodist Church, Clayton, N. C; 
Washington Street Church, High Point, 
N. C; Member of St. Paul's Church, 
Goldsboro, N. C. ; Miscellaneous subscrip- 
tions, $12,000.00; Total subscribed to date, 
$17,500.00. 




PROPOSED NEW DORMITORY, GREENSBORO FEMALE COLLEGE. 



An Encouraging Testimonial from a Satisfied Customer 

I had the Advocate Press bind two volumes of my Clarke's Commentary. The work is neat- 
ly done, and has every appearance of durability. I am highly pleased with it. I got it done for 
less money than any other printing establishment would undertake to do it. 

Salisbury, N. C, January 6th, 1912. OTHO J. JONES. 



BSeSs Christian prorate 



ESTABLISHED 1S55 



H. M. BLAIR. Editor 


Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the 


M. E. 


Church, South 


$1 .50 Per Annum in Advance 


Volume LVII. 


GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 


1, 191 


2 


Number 5 



A STUDY IN EDUCATION 

3)y STONEWALL ANDERSON 



The figures used in this study are taken from 
the report of the Commissioner of Education of 
the United States or the year 1910. It is hardly 
necessary to say that it is not claimed for these 
figures that they set forth accurately the exact 
educational situation. Some of the institutions of 
the country failed to make reports to the Commis- 
sioner. Others, doubtless, have been more or less 
careless with their figures. Still, they are suffi- 
ciently accurate to teach with confidence, certain 
important lessons. 

According to the report, there are in the United 
States 602 institutions of learning, classed by the 
Commissioner of Education as colleges, universi- 
ties and techological schools. These institutions 
are classified as State, Non-sectarian, and Sectar- 
ian. The number in each class, together with the 
number of students enrolled, value of the plants, 
and the annual current account, is as follows: 

Number, 89; Institution, State; Value of Plant, 
$105,782,000; Current Account, $32,873,000; Stuu- 
dents, 67,626. 

Number, 126; Institution, Non-sectarian; Value 
of Plant, $107,789,000; Current Account, $25,343,000; 
Students, 78,303. 

Number, 387; Institution, Denominational; Val- 
ue of Plant, $93,042,276; Current Account, $20,529,- 
494; Students, 155,887. 

Of the 387 institutions classed as sectarian, 56 
are Roman Catholic, with a student enrollment of 
18,715. This leaves 331 Protestant denominational 
institutions, with a student enrollment of 137,173. 

In these institutions, practically the entire work 
of higher education in the United States is being 
done. Of course it will be understood that the 
work of high schools and academies is excluded 
from this reckoning. The volume of the business 
of higher education as engaged in by this country 
is here indicated. The quality of it depends upon 
the efficiency and faithfulness of these institutions. 

The three agencies have invested in buildings, 
grounds and equipment, $306,613,376. The total 
current account for 1910 was $78,745,494. 

It will be remembered that a large part of the 
amount expended for annual current expenses of 
the state institutions is appropriated by the sever- 
al legislatures from the state treasuries. Many of 
these institutions also receive grants from the 
United States Government. In both the denomina- 
tional and non-sectarian institutions, a consider- 
able part of the current account is secured from 
tuition fees paid by the student. 

A greatest part, perhaps, of the non-sectarian 
and the denominational institutions, as well as 
some of those of the state are endowed. The total 
endowment for the three classes of institutions are 
as follows: 

State $ 32,659,000 

Non-sectarian 143,610,000 

Denominational 97,154,000 

Of the 302,818 students enrolled, 201,341 are men, 
and 100,477 women. Thus it is seen that, taking 
the whole country over, there is one male student 
for every 456 of the population; and one female 
student for every 916 of the population. Of course 
the percentage of the population attending higher 
institutions of learning is very much larger in 
some states than in others. In Massachusetts, for 
example, there is one man for every 329 of the 
population, and one woman for every 603; while 
in Florida, there is one man for every 1,756 of the 
population; one woman for every 1,137. 

The figures given above suggest important les- 
sons, some of which I will proceed to mention. 

1. The program of higher education in this 
country is not in the hands of any single agency. 



vate effort. Undoubtedly these figures show the 
It is being carried forward by three classes of 
agencies; the State, the Non-sectarian, and the 
Denominational institutions. Whether for good or 
ill, for weal or woe, these three kinds of agencies 
are the principal forces working out the problems 
of higher education in this nation. 

2. In the second place, they indicate the part 
which each class of agencies is paying in the 
higher education of the youth of the country. Of 
all the students in higher institutions of learning, 
not quite one in four are in those conducted by the 
state. About one in three are in non-sectarian in- 
stitutions; and more than one-half, in the denomi- 
national colleges and universities. 

The state has invested in buildings and grounds, 
about $1,300 for each student enrolled in its insti- 
tutions, and expends annually on its current ac- 
count about $373 per student. The nonsectarian 
institutions 'have invested in buildings and grounds 
about $1,376 for each student enrolled; and ex- 
pends annually per student about $323. The de- 
nominational institutions have invested in buildings 
and ground? $584 for each student enrolled, and 
expends annually per student about $132. 

Including the Roman Catholic schools, the 
Church colleges enroll 9,960 more students annual- 
ly than both the state and non-sectarian colleges 
put together. It may he said that many of the 
students enrolled in the church colleges are pre- 
paratory and really doing high school work. This 
is very true. But let it also be remembered that 
many of the students enrolled both in the non-sec- 
sectarian and state institutions are preparatory. 
Of the 126 non-sectarian institutions, more than 
half, — exactly sixty-five— maintain preparatory de- 
partments. Of course some of the preparatory de- 
partments in the non-sectarian and state institutions 
are quite small; in others, they are large. The 
same is true of denominational institutions. More- 
over, in many instanecs the students in the prepar- 
atory departments of denominational schools are 
there because they were not accessible to second- 
ary institutions in the communities from whence 
they came. Their homes are in parts of the coun- 
try wher high schools have not been developed, 
and will not be, for years to come Hence, it may be 
said that maintaining preparatory departments for 
such students, the denominational institutions are 
not in competition with the state high schools, but 
are rather aiding the state to do what should be 
done for its citizens. 

3. These figures further indicate the financial 
limitations of the state in the matter of giving 
higher education to the people. We have seen that 
the whole number of students pursuing higher ed- 
ucation, less than one out of every four are provided 
for by the state. Of the value of the total equip- 
ment in buildings and grounds, provided for high- 
er education, the state furnishes less than one-third. 
It is clear that to furnish the means which have 
been put into the educational plants and endow- 
ments of the non-pectarian and denominational 
institutions of the country has been, and now is, a 
financial burden which the state has not been, and 
is not now, either willing or able to bear. To 
educate the 232,290 students enrolled in the non- 
sectarian and denominational institutions, t|here 
is an expenditure on the part of these two agencies 
of $200,831,376 for buildings and grounds, of $240,- 
764,000 for endowment, and of $45,872 for current 
expenses. 

We sometimes hear it said that it is necessary 
for private effort to supplement that of the state 
in education. In the real mof higher education, it 
appears rather that the state is supplementing pri- 
inability of the state to cope with the problems of 



higher education from a merely financial stand- 
point. I am offering no criticism on the state in 
this matter, but merely stating the facts. The 
state rightly makes its heaviest expenditures in 
the realm of the common schools. There was ex- 
pended on the state common schools for the year 
1908-09 more than $400,000,000, and for state high 
schools more than $17,000,000. 

The financial benefits of the church college is 
not often dwelt upon. When we consider that the 
church is educating in her colleges and universi- 
ties more than half of the students in all the insti- 
tutions of higher learning in the whole country, 
and that without one cent of expense to the state, 
and when we also consider the immense cost at- 
tached to the work, giving, as shown in the figuers 
above, higher education, we are able to appreciate 
in some measure the importance of the church's 
efforts in this field — from a purely financial stand- 
point 

I am free to admit that the church educates at 
far less cost than the state, or than non-sectarian 
institutions. It is sometimes charged that the 
church has cheapened education. I am free to ad- 
mit that in some quarters this is undoubtedly true. 
I hasten to say, however, that the same, in certain 
quarters, is true of the other two great educational 
agencies operating in this field. On the other hand, 
I maintain with conviction, that the sound, con- 
structive, progressive, educational work which the 
church is doing in many of her institutions, infinite- 
ly outweighs the errors, mistakes and even blun- 
ders which she may be making in a few of her 
schools. 

4. We have seen how the figures above show 
the inadequacy of the state financially to give high- 
er education to the people. But there is another 
direction in which the state's limitations are more 
apparent. If it has financial disabilities, its moral 
and religious limitations are still more pronounced. 
Of course I do not mean to take the position that 
state institutions are hostile to morals and religion; 
far from it. My point is simply this, that in the 
field of education, a state constructed as ours 
is, because of inherant limitations, is unable to 
meet moral and religious needs. These limitations 
and disabilities apply to the spheres of primary 
and secondary education, as well as that of higher 
education. It is certain that the state has never 
been able to meet such needs, is not now doing it, 
nor do I see how it can. 

Take the situation as it presents itself. Nearly 
10,000 more students are pursuing their education 
in the institutions of the Church which are confes- 
sedly religious foundations, than are in both state 
and non-sectarian colleges and universities. Be- 
sides, many of the non-sectarian institutions are 
themselves genuinely religious foundations, and 
have been from the beginning. None of the non- 
sectarian institutions have the moral and religious 
handicaps which the state institutions necessarily 
have under our form of government. An over- 
whelming majority of the young men and women 
of our country seeking higher education are doing 
so in colleges and universities which are religious 
foundations. They have constantly held before 
them religious ideals. The ethics which they study 
are Christian ethics. The atmosphere which they 
breathe is filled with the Christian spirit. The 
outlook on the world which they gain in these insti- 
tutions is the Christian outlook. They have held 
up before them constantly the sacrificial rather 
than the selfish life, as that for which they must 
strive, and unto which they must attain. My posi- 
tion then is, that the denominational colleges and 
non-sectarian religious foundations are holding and 
Continued on Page Five. Column Three 



Page Two 



February 1st, 1912 



TO OUR PATRONS 

The Board of Publication desires to ex- 
press their appreciation of the manner in 
which many pastors entered last year into 
the effort to extend the circulation of the 
North Carolina Christian Advocate, and to 
express the hope that all will join in the 
effort this year to retain the full list of 
former subscribers and secure the largest 
increase we have ever had in a single year. 

We are daily receiving from all sections 
of our patronizing territory such expressions 
of appreciation of the paper as we hav© 
never had before, and we feel that this is 
the time to press for increase of circulation 
as never betore. 1 here are great possibili- 
ties of enlargement in all our work, if we 
will only give our people the light of intel- 
ligence, and nothing promises to help us 
more promptly and effectually than the cir- 
culation of our paper. 

Brother pastor, this is the set time. Do 
your best and you will have not only our 
thanks, but the approval of God. 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

D. B. Coltrane, President. 
H. M. Blair, Agent and Treasurer. 



EDITORIAL j 



EDITORIAL NOTES 

A Conference of the Secretaries of the Board of 
Education of the several denominations of the 
country, was held January 17th in Philadelphia. 
Steps were taken to form a permanent organization. 
The name of the new institution is, "Council of 
Church Boards of Education." 

* * * * 

At the recent meeting of the National Child La- 
bor Committee at Louisville, Dr. Carroll G. Pears, 
president of the National Educational Society gave 
expression to what we consider sane views on the 
question of child labor. He said: 

"Children have labored since Adam delved and 
Eve spun; and the labor generally has been good 
for their bodies and for their souls." 

We have been hoping all along that some one 
officially connected with this work would some 
time admit that the evil to be remedied is not la- 
bor, but conditions prevailing in connection with 
the work of the children. Dr. Pears continues: 

"It is an evil, when the physical or moral condi- 
tions surrounding the child are unwholesome, when 
by it he is deprived of education for the mind and 
of the joy of life." 

We sincerely hope that those who have charge 
of this work of reform will cease their efforts to put 
children out of work entirely and adopt a plan 
that will provide for short hours, making their 
daily labor a part of their education. The golden 
mean is what we want, and the best place for the 
training of the child to work is not in the vocation- 
al school but in the actual work of the shop, field 
or factory. 

* * * * 

A friend at our elbow, knowing our sentiment in 
regard to certain games and the overdoing of sports 
in general by the Y. M. C. A., suggests that our edi- 
torial expressing pleasure at the opening of the Y. 
M. C. A. in Greensboro was rather inconsistent. We 
hope not, as we would dislike very much to be guil- 
ty of trying to carry water on both shoulders. 

We believe in what we have always understood 
the Y. M. C. A. to stand for, that is the keeping 
of young men as far as possible during their hours 
of leisure, under good moral and religious influences. 
We do not, however, think it at all necessary in 
order to accomplish this that there should be pool 
and billiard tables provided, and we had hoped that 
these would be left out of the Greensboro Y. M. 
C. A. As they have not been left out we hope that 
the religious public sentiment of the city will yet 
cause the directors to reconsider and remove them. 
The association with these appendages can only 
expect lukewarm support on the part of many of 
the most devoted Christian people, besides a very 
hurtful hostility on the part of many. So it would 



seem eminently wise for the directors to weigh 
well the question as to whether any possible ad- 
vantage of these games that have been tabooed by 
Christian public sentiment, can compensate for this 
loss of Christian moral support. In many cases 
we fear there is a mere modicum of religious train- 
ing in the Y. M. C. A., while abundant provision is 
made for physical training and the gratifying of 
a mania for sport. 

What we have said here applies not only to 
Greensboro but to the Y. M. C. A. everywhere. So 
we are not going to retract our expression of pleas- 
ure at the opening of this institution, but give em- 
phasis to what we believe to be a widespread feel- 
ing of regret among many good people that the ob- 
jectionable games have been brought along with 
it. We do not believe that the game of pool or 
billiards can be sanctified. 



THE RELIGIOUS PRESS INDISPENSABLE 

Referring to the fact that the paper has always 
made an earnest advocacy of the cause of their 
Conference schools, the editor of the Wesleyan 
Christian Advocate says: 

"No institution of the Church is more vitally re- 
lated to all of the work and movements of the 
Church than is the religious press. It is a neces- 
sary part of our machinery — not unlike the tur- 
bine wheel — making all the other parts more effi- 
cient in their motion, really giving to all of the 
others whatever of motion they have." 

This suggests how the church at large accepts 
the work of the religious press as a sort of matter 
of course without stopping to consider how much 
depends upon the publicity afforded and how de- 
pendent we are upon the existence of these papers. 
In the case of our own Conference it is difficult 
to see how we could have launched our Children's 
Home without the service of the Advocate. When 
we come to realize the vital relation which our 
church press sustains to all departments of the 
work it is apparent that we are not all as enthu- 
siastic for extending the circulation of the paper as 
we should be. 



CONGRATULATIONS, DR. WEAVER 

The General Board of Education of the Rockefel- 
ler Foundation last Friday granted a conditional 
gift of $50,000 to Emory and Henry College, Vir- 
ginia, toward a $250,000 fund. This item of news 
will have peculiar interest for many of our readers. 
Emery and Henry is the pride of the Holston Con- 
ference, and a large section of our State was form- 
erly in that conference. Many of the leaders in 
various walks of life in that particular section of 
North Carolina and not a few throughout the State 
at large, were educated at Emory and Henry. It 
is the alma mater of several of the members of the 
Western North Carolina Conference. Last summer 
the writer heard the Governor in making an ad- 
dress incidentally refer to the fact that his father 
was educated there. Sons of two of the members 
of the Western North Carolina Conference are 
members of the faculty. Dr. Chas. Weaver, the 
President, is the son of Rev. Dr. J. H. Weaver, of 
Monroe, N. C, and Crawford, of the English De- 
partment, is the son of the late Rev. Dr. L. 
W. Crawford. These young men are well known 
throughout our Conference, Dr. Weaver having 
been a member of Conference and having held the 
presidency of both Rutherford and Davenport, and 
L. W. Crawford having taught at Rutherford. The 
great hold which Emory and Henry has upon its 
old students scattered throughout the South and 
especially the esteem in which the Holston Con- 
ference holds it, assures the speedy fulfillment of 
the condition which the General Board has made 
to secure its $50,000. The students of Emory and 
Henry have taken distinguished rank in civil life 
and in the church. Four of the present college of 
bishops of our church, Hoss, Atkins, Waterhouse, 
and Lambeth, attended school there. The old Col- 
lege is coming into its own. Congratulations, Dr. 
Weaver! 



THE SECRET OF THE REVIVAL 

Now that we are calling for the forward move- 
ment in evangelistic effort it will be well for all 
to study the conditions under which revival power 
may be expected in the church. We must not for- 
get that the church is composed of individuals, 
and that primarily the revival is a matter which 
concerns the individual. Many great meetings 
where multitudes have gathered and listened to 
6tirring sermons and where great choirs have add- 



ed enthusiasm to the occasion with stirring music, 
have not been revivals. 'Ihere is a vast ditteience 
between the enthusiasm which agitates the surface 
of multitudes and that deep conviction which agi- 
tates the heart of individuals awakened by convic- 
tion for sin. The true revival begins here and is 
frequently the forerunner, but seldom the result of 
religious marches and counter marches. 

As is pointed out in the article of Brother J. A. 
Bowles, printed elsewhere, the pastor is not likely 
to bring up the rear in this great work. In this 
there shall be "like people, like priest." A pastor 
whose heart does not cry out for the salvation of 
his people is sure to quench the zeal of those who 
would go forward. The fire cannot be kindled upon 
the altar unless the hands of the priest are lifted 
up, holy, and "without wrath and doubting." 

If we are to have a revival the message of the pul- 
pit must be a call to repentance, 'the pastor must 
know how to preach on repentance in the believer. 
If he doubts here let him study the prophets from 
the time of Moses to the days of John the Baptist 
and see how clearly the message rings out to 
God's people in the call to repeiitence. Let him 
study John Wesley and see how he shows the 
necessity of the same thing. Let him study the 
daily lives of his own people and see if there is not 
abundant evidence of the fact that the Holy Spirit 
is grieved with their daily conduct and conversa- 
tion. No church living in constant violation of the 
law of the indwelling Spirit can be a purveyor of 
the life and power of the gospel to others. 

• * • • 

The editor of the Northwestern discussing this 
subject, says: 

"God asked of Judah, as the prerequisite to a 
spiritual renewal, only a willing heart. Even God 
can do nothing for us against our will or in the 
face of indifference. If one is disposed to say that 
he never felt the rapture of God's presence in his 
heart, the trouble is not with me Church, or the 
minister, or the creed, or the service, but with 
himself. Has he ever set himself seriously and 
devoutly to "the practice of the presence of God?" 
If not, why should he complain? Even to love one's 
friend involves in us all a determinate, positive af- 
fection of which ws are conscious and which we 
consciously cultivate. Friendship flourishes best 
among those dtermined to be friendly with God. 

The same is true of a Church, for a Church, like 
an individual, creates its own atmosphere. To "get 
up a revival" is either the simplest or the most 
futile thing in the world; just loving is either spon- 
taneous or impossible. A Church genuinely and 
earnestly aiming at God's will is being perpetually 
renewed; it creates for itself the unmistakable at- 
mosphere of devotion to which God can respond. 
In such a church God does work because He can 
work. 

But a heart ever so willing is not for that rea- 
son a self-originating porwer. It becomes a power 
because in its willingness it makes room for the 
play of the divine power. It is ^he divine working 
through man which accomplishes the divine ends 
and purposes. And thus it is that the best of re- 
vival machinery is no more than machinery until 
th* Spirit if God moves upon and through it. The 
machinery may, and doubtless does, serve a good 
purpose; the most successful revivals have owed 
much to method. But just as machinery, just as 
method, they are of themselves unavialing. 

In the vision of Zechariah there was a golden 
lamp stand with a bowl upon it and seven lamps 
with seven pipes between two olive trees. Now 
the whole value of the lamp stand in the Temple 
would have been invalidated by the absence of 
oil; the light of our human life is fed from the 
grace of God. It is the anointing of His Spirit that 
is the spring of our spiritual well-being. One may 
be ever so industrious about the multiplied relig- 
ious activities of the Church, its meetings and its 
philanthropic enterprises; these are but the gold- 
en pipes, the channels through which the oil may 
come.. To give light we must live close to the 
heart of God and have every activity of our own 
minds and hearts bleseed and nourished by the 
closest communion of our spirits with his Spirit." 



WANTED, A PHOTOGRAPH 

I will give $3.00 for a photograph of the first 
MEN'S Mission Study Class organized and now at 
work in the Western North Carolina Conference. 

This means a real Laymen's Mission Study Class. 
If there was one organized in 1911 and is still at 
work I will take that, if not, I want a photograph 
of the first one organized in 1912. H. K. Boyer. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



OBSERVATIONS 

"The kingdom of heaven is like unto leaven which 
a woman took and hid in the three measures of 
meal, till the whole was leavened." Matt. 13:33. 
The truth is steadily but surely leavening the lump 
of humanity. It may seem slow at times but it is 
gaining ground and finally will subdue all the na- 
tions. 

Who dreamed a hundred years ago that in a her- 
mit nation like China, Christianity would today be 
a force the most powerful to be reckoned with? 
The first missionaries of the cross who went there 
did so at the peril of their lives and many of them 
were muredered, but other men of faith were ready 
to thake their places and carry on the work and 
slowly did those sad-faced children of Paganism 
heed the teachings of the self-denying heralds of 
the truth. 

Finally, however, a foothold was secured and the 
Church began by degrees to grow. Schools and 
■hospitals were established and care was taken of 
the bodies and minds of the people as well as the 
souls. 

The Christian home became the model and the 
light of truth shone from it and the illuminating 
power of the gospel lifted the bodies of the people 
from slavery and as they trusted in the Lord Jesus 
and found salvation, their minds and spirits were 
freed from the bondage of ignorance and supersti- 
tion. Leaders were developed among the natives 
and the kingdom grew in influence more than in 
numbers. The people became restive under the 
oppression which had enslaved them for forty cen- 
turies and rose up in their might and drove royalty 
from the throne and established a free and modern 
system of government, selecting for President Dr. 
Sun Yat Sen, a decided Christian and a pronounced 
advocate of free government. 

It seemed that we were making such slow head- 
way in China but leaven always works noiselessly. 
The kingdom comes without observation. Chris- 
tian schools were silently shaping the thought of 
youth and Christian homes were a striking contrast 
to the heathen homes around them and the Ohristly 
spirit of the missionaries all combined to teach the 
people the better way. Slowly did the truth take 
root in that heathen soil but it was watered by the 
blood of the martyrs and flourished until now that 
vast empire has thrown off the shackles and chosen 
a Christian to rule over them. 

We cannot estimate what this means to the 
churoh. The political rulers are held in reverence 
by the populace and the court sets the fashion for 
the people. A Christian ruler will mean right of 
way for Christian teachers and a rapid growth of 
the church. 

What wonders hath God wrought in that Pagan 
land in a hundred years! 

It seemed that the work was slow indeed but 
when we consider the fruits of a century we are 
amazed at the progress made. The leaven contin- 
ues to work more rapidly as it multiplies. 

• * * * 

The trend of mankind from the earliest times 
has been from the country to the city. By slow de- 
grees the city population has grown in America 
until now a majority of the people are urban and 
the ratio is likely to increase with the growth of 
the country. This is enevitable and not encourag- 
ing. We must have cities and they must be sup- 
plied with fresh, vigorous country blood or they 
would rot in a few decades. The steady stream of 
people to the city has been the subject of muoh 
study, and many ways have been proposed to stem 
the tide. The farmer went to town for the school 
and many other advantages which the country a 
score of years ago did not supply, but country life 
today has attractions which our fathers were de- 
prived of. The school terms have been lengthened 
and teachers far more efficient than in the old days 
are instructing the children. All conditions of peo- 
ple are taking advantage of these rare opportuni- 
ties. The graded school is common now in country 
places and a vigorous educational spirit is abroad 
in the land. 

Then we have now in many counties besides 
Mecklenburg (which was the pioneer in the work) 
a system of good roads and the rural citizens can 
in any kind of weather travel with comfort and 
rapidity. The rural mail system brings to his door 
the daily paper and the telephone keeps him in 
close touoh with the live, moving world and these 
with the improved methods of farming with large 
yields on few acres, all combined give a charm 
to country life which tends to hold many who 



otherwise would rush to the city. The strength 
of the nation lies in an intelligent and religious 
moral citizenship. The cities cannot go to destruc- 
tion while there remains in the country districts 
a strong reserve of manly and self-denying people 
who know the right and have the courage to per- 
form it. In our own state nearly all the people 
are country folk and it will be a long time before 
the cities will grow to the point when they will 
contain a majority of the population. The last 
census gave North Carolina 2,206,287 population 
and only 318,477 of these live in our cities, fiighty- 
five per cent of the population of our State is rural 
This is a fine showing and it will be many years 
yet before agriculture will cease to be our chief 
industry. 

* » » * 

The Baptists of the North have just raised in a 
six weeks' campaign the sum of two hundred thou- 
sand dollars toward a fund for pensioning aged 
ministers. They were encouraged to do this through 
the offer of one liberal man who pledged $50,000.00 
on the condition that the rank and file in six weeks 
raise four times that amount. And then the breth- 
ren did the work with a rush. 

No class of men deserve a pension In old age 
more than ministers. Most of them are poor in 
this world's goods and are unable with meagre sal- 
aries to provide for a rainy day or for the necessi- 
ties of old age. When the time for superannuation 
comes the prospect for food and raiment looks 
gloomy and most of them in old age lack the com- 
forts which those who have been blessed by their 
ministry enjoy to the full. We are glad our Bap- 
tist brethren have taken this forward step and 
trust the task so easily accomplished in six weeks 
may encourage them to go on and lay up a great 
endowment fund for their old preachers. 

The millionaires have done great things in recent 
years for higher education and laid aside vast 
sums for pensioning teachers whose salaries have 
generally been liberal but the millionaire seems not 
to appreciate the fact that the gospel light was the 
forerunner of the educational revival and the Chris- 
tian minister prepared the way for all the modern 
blessings we enjoy and surely he deserves a pen- 
sion before any others. 

The soldiers and sailors who have fought the 
battles of the country and the widows too, are not 
forgotten by the government, and should not be. 
We are glad that provision has been made for, 
them and for the aged teacher too, but regret that 
no very rich man has heard the call to rally to the 
support of the old preachers who after the heat 
and burden of the years, tarry for a while in pov- 
erty extreme listening for the summons to "cross 
over the river and rest under the shade." Our 
church has always made provision in a limited 
way for the superannuates but the meagre allow- 
ance is far from adequate to the comfortable sup- 
port they deserve, and those who have no children 
able to supplement the meagre pension granted by 
the Conference have to look for liberal neighbors 
for help in many emergencies. 

The General Conference of 1902 launched the 
movement for a superannuate endowment fund 
which has been growing slowly for these ten years 
and is now hardly $200,000.00 while the goal to bo 
reached is five millions. There is muoh to be done 
before the task is finished but the work could be 
proni' ied by more large gifts from the rich. The 
sum already secured came largely from the poor 
and considerably from small salaried preachers and 
if at last the full sum is reached it will no doubt 
be found, that the .poor were the liberal givers. The 
great mass of our people are poor and we find with 
few exceptions that the most liberal and generous 
souls are those who have not permitted covetous- 
ness to clutch them and strangle the source of 
generosity. 

* * • • 

Mr. J. A. Odell, the founder of the Odell Hard- 
ware Co. of Greensboro, has retired from the active 
management of that great business and his friends 
throughout the church wish for him the well-earned 
•est which he deserves. 

Brother Odell is a captain of industry who has 
won his way to high position in tne commercial 
world by steady service, rare business judgment 
and exemplary character. When a young man he 
was reliable, energetic and frugal and his whole 
record has been highly honorable. He possessed 
in a rare degree all the qualifications necessary for 
a successful career and it must surely be gratifying 
to him, as it is to his many friends, that he can 



now cast off the burden of responsibility and still 
leave a great business for younger men to direct. 
But he has made a record which counts for a great 
deal more than business success. He has been a 
faithful member of the church for many, many 
years and given liberally of his time, his thought 
and bis means to advance the Kingdom of God. 

He is a model layman, a Christian business man, 
who was never too busy in the management of great 
affairs to attend the meetings of the local Church 
or the Annual or General Conference when he was 
needed at these. 

Every session of the Annual Conference I have 
attended Bro. Odell has also attended and was busy 
as could be on the Joint Board of Fnance and seems 
absolutely indispensable at our Annual sessions. 
Our finances are safe in his hands and the church 
honors him as one of its elect members and offi- 
cials. 

This free expression on his character is written 
because it is merited by one who is faithful, un- 
assuming and true, and because it is well to say 
some kind words while our friends can hear them. 

W. L. S. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Charlotte Methodists have subscribed $10,000 
toward the erection of a handsome school building 
at the Children's Home. While plans have not 
been drawn for the proposed new structure, it is 
known that Superintendent Hayes has additional 
subscriptions amounting to about $3,000 for the 
school building. 

— Rev. C. M. Campbell is a pastor who does not 
allow grass to grow under his feet. He is always 
busy and brings things to pass. Last week he 
held special missionary services in his church at 
Davidson in which he was ably assisted by Dr. H. 
K. Boyer, our Conference Missionary Secretary, and 
Rev. L. T. Mann, his presiding elder. 

—Dr. Gilbert T. Rowe, of Tryon Street, Charlotte, 
will early in February conduct an evangelistic 
meeting at Trinity College for the 'benefit of the 
student body. He held a very successful meeting 
there several years ago and is very popular with 
the boys. We hope there may be a great spiritual 
uplift among the students as a result of the meet- 
ing. 

— Last Sunday, a bright and beautiful day after 
a series of black and stormy ones, brought large 
congregations to most churches and the Observer 
says that Dr. Marr preached to an unusually large 
congregation at Trinity Church, Charlotte, an un- 
usually strong sermon and at the evening hour 
Supt. Hayes, of the Children's Home, spoke in be- 
haif of that institution. 

— The funeral of Miss Martha Clark was held 
last Thursday afternoon at Reboboth church, five 
miles south of the city, Rev. W. R. Ware conducting 
the service. Miss Clark came to this county re- 
cently from Randolph county and was on a visit 
to her brother, Mr. William Clark, near Rehobeth 
church, when she became ill and died Wednesday 
evening at the age of 72 years. 

— Great crowds are attending the meetings at 
West Market Street church this week, conducted 
by Rev. Herbert Booth. Mr. Booth is proving him- 
self a preacher of great power and we feel hopeful 
that large results for good may be achieved. Mr. 
Smith, the leader of the singing, has heen very 
much enjoyed. Greensboro is very fortunate in 
having the privilege of hearing these two consecrat- 
ed men. 

— President Dudley, of the A. & M. College for 
the colored race has arranged for a "farmers' week" 
for colored farmers at the college for the week be- 
ginning February 12. Free entertainment will be 
provided for those who desire to attend and receive 
practical instruction in modern farm work. Doubt- 
less a large number of colored farmers from all 
sections of the state will take advantage of this 
opportunity. 

— Many friends will learn with sorrow of the 
death of Mr. Thos. E. Field, one of the pioneer 
merchants of Hickory. Mr. Field had been in 
feeble health for a number of years, the immediate 
cause of his death being a stroke of paralysis. A 
special from Hickory dated January 18th, says: 
In his younger years he was one of the leading 
merchants of this part of the state. He came here 
with his brother, R. H. Field, from Kernersville 
in 1870, and about twenty years ago the brothers 
dissolved partnership, the latter going to Charlotte, 
where he recently died. The funeral was held 
this afternoon at 3:30 at the Mthodist churoh. of 
which he was a steward for many years. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Four 



CONFERENCE OF CHAIRMAN OF SUNDAY 
SCHOOL BOARDS AND FIELD SECRETA 
RIES M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH 

Thiis is the day of numerous conferences, insti- 
tutes and inspirational meetings for the advance- 
ment of all sorts of interests, social, educational, 
and religious. A practical busy man is often led 
to suspect that this phase of activity is overdone. 
The writer is one of those busy men who sympa- 
thizes with this view. He believes that there 
should be an intensifying of thought and effort 
at home in each individual church, and less run- 
ning to and fro for conference and public meet- 
ings. It was with convictions like these that he 
obeyed the order of the Sunday School Board of 
the Western North Carolina Conference and went 
last week to New Orleans to attend the above 
named Conference. The program of this Confer- 
ence, however, was so sane and practical and the 
discussions so helpful that those who attended 
were constrained to believe that the outlay of time 
and money was worth while. 

The program this year gathered about the work 
of Conference Boards and Field Secretaries, and 
the best trained and most experienced men in the 
church gave themselves with great earnestness 
and enthusiasm to the solution of problems that 
confront us every day in the field. 

Dr. Chappell opened the Conference on Wednes- 
day night, Jan. 10th, with a most illuminating ad- 
dress on the Sunday school work of the church as 
seen by our editor and his co-laborers. Thursday 
and Friday evenings were given to the discussion 
of themes of general interest. Dr. Bulla spoke on 
"Leading the Leaders," and this writer spoke on 
"The Unification of Church and Sunday School in 
Spirit, Aim and Effort," and Dr. Hamill spoke on 
"Sunday School Opportunities of Southern Method- 
ism." 

The practical and efficient work of the Confer- 
ence was done in the day sessions in which such 
men as Mr. Pepper, of Memphis, and Mr. Cooper, 
of Wilmington, gave us the benefit of their wis- 
dom and experience in the discussion of such sub- 
jects as the work of the Annual Conference Board, 
Field Secretaries, Conference Anniversaries, Year 
Books, Children's Day, etc. 

The consensus of opinion in the Conference on 
the subject of Field Secretaries was contrary to 
the view of the writer, but the advocates of paid 
Conference and District Secretaries made out a 
strong case for the employment of such specialists. 
This is a day of specialization, and perhaps it is 
wise to have a Field Secretary of Sunday Schools 
as well as for Missions and Education. I confess, 
however, to grave doubts about the wisdom of Con- 
ference Secretaries for any of these departments 
of church work. Every pastor and presiding elder 
in the church ought to be charged, primarily with 
these vital interests of the Kingdom of God, and 
they ought to be trained to lay their hands in a 
practical way upon them and direct them without 
the aid of a Secretary. There is danger of going 
to seed on secretaryships as well as on Conferences 
and inspirational meetings. The work that counts 
must be done by pastor's and the charges they 
serve. 

The Conference created a standing committee to 
take into consideration such legislaton as in the 
estimation of this aggregation of workers from the 
field will facilitate the workings of the Boards of 
which they are chairmen. There seemed to be 
some apprehension on the part of some, that we 
were transcending the purposes of our coming to- 
gether, but there certainly can be no danger in 
suggestions to the law-making body of our church 
from men who confront the problems that present 
themselves in the field. 

The importance of Children's Day had a first 
place in the deliberations of the Conference. The 
Conference Board derives all its resources from 
the collections taken on this day. It must be very 
clear then that if any aggressive work is to be 
undertaken by the Conerence Boards this day must 
be observed and the collection taken and sent to 
the treasurer. Those Conferences, such as the 
Memphis for instance, that have secured the uni- 
versal observance of the day are putting some of us 
to shame in the work that they are accomplishing. 

Permit me to put in a plea for the observance of 
the day in all our churches. The Board will fur- 
nish programs free of charge to any school that 
will communicate with Rev. W. A. Lambeth, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 

Chas. W. Byrd. 



OUR EVANGELISTIC MOVEMENT 

Dear Advocate: Since the Evangelistic Commit- 
tee, created by the action of our last Annual Con- 
ference, has named the evangelistic leaders for the 
respective districts of our Conference; and where- 
as, the committee has honored me by appointing 
me leader of the Shelby District, I wish to give 
expression to a few thoughts upon this subject: 
The great question that suggests itself to my mind 
is, how may we promote revivals in our churches? 
This is # the great aim of this movement. Anything 
short of this will set aside the movement as a 
useless undertaking. As i view it, the necessity 
for this inquiry, how to promote revivals in our 
churches, is ominously suggestive. Yet this knowl- 
edge ought to be instinctive in Methodist churches. 
It ought to be bred in Methodist blood and Metho- 
dist bone; for our great church was born in a re- 
vival promoted by our illustrious founder. It lies 
at the very heart of Methodist purity and thrift. 
The revival fire is divine fire in the Church of God. 
The ability to promote a revival is the true test 
of the spiritual condition of all our churches. The 
ability or inability of any church to exert the 
spiritual energy necessary for a revival is just 
simply the indisputable proof of the presence or 
absence of God's spirit in the church. 

The revival is not a foreign or accidental thing to 
the church as some may imagine; but it is some- 
thing that must occur in the life of every true 
Church of God. Not to have these seasons of re- 
freshing from the presence of God should be the 
cause of heart-searching and deep contrition before 
God. Some may complain of occasional character 
of revivals, and claim that we ought to have contin- 
uous revivals in our churches. True enough. But we 
are not dealing with what we ought to have. We 
all admit that we ought to have a great many 
things we do not have; and we ought to be differ- 
ent in a great many ways. These things be said to 
our shame and humiliation. The history of Meth- 
odism shows that revivals in our churches are oc- 
casional and have been during all ages. There are 
times of spiritual visitations when the power of 
God is graciously manifest in an unusual degree, 
and when the church is quickened and stirred to 
a vivid realization of the solemnities of the spiritual 
world. Some times they break out in the most 
unacountable manner and are attended by the 
most marvelous manifestations as on the day of 
Pentecost. 

We do not know all of the conditions 
but one thing we do know that whenever a church 
bestirs itself and turns to God with a full purpose 
of heart and soul, and becomes impatiently anxious 
for a visitation of God's reviving grace, God always 
visits the church and a revival is the happy re- 
sult. In fact it is a dead church, the apostate 
church that restrains the power of God. While 
on the other hand it is the quickened aggressive, 
heroic church that is made glorious. If our church- 
es can but be led to consciously realize the great 
saving, sanctifying truths of our holy religion and 
if they can be but weaned from the world, and 
with great purpose of heart and mind be prompted 
and inspired by the Holy Spirit to unitedly and 
earnestly seek God a revival will inevitably follow. 
Here is the great work before us all in the promo 
tion of a revival in our churches. 

But brethren, may I suggest, that back of all this 
is the preacher, pastors in charge of our churches. 
The pastor is the promoter. The revival must be- 
gin with him. In fact, it is a rare occurrence for a 
church to go beyond the pastor in spiritual experi- 
ence and expectation. He, as a rule, gauges, almost 
limits the Spirit's operation in his charge. There 
may toe isolated cases because of some local condi- 
tions and lack of former spiritual life and activity, 
when no revival can toe promoted for the time being 
yet it requires that the revival fire must first be in 
the preacher's heart. It must burn in his bones. 
It must quicken and stir first of all in his soul. 
His faith and expectation must hold the good in 
keeping 'even while it may be afar off. He must 
sow the seeds in the hearts and minds of the people 
and with sublime faith wait patiently for the mani- 
festation of God. This I admit involves a tremen- 
dous responsibility resting upon men called and 
commissioned to preach the word of God to our 
churches, but I honestly believe that the pastor 
holds the key that unlocks the store house and 
opens up the treasures of God's reviving grace. Up- 
on the travail of the soul, the fervency of his pray- 
ers, the measure of his faith, the genuineness of his 
consecration largely depends How to promote re- 
vivals in our churches. J. A. Bowles. 



February 1st, 1912 



AN URGENT APPEAL TO THE MINISTERS 

I make the following urgent appeal in behalf of 
the W. C. t. U. of North Carolina for a united ef- 
fort on the part of the Christian ministry and all 
Christendom for help to rid North Carolina of the 
lawlessness of the liquor traffic. It should be 
brought to the attention of every minister of the 
gospel throughout the country, that he should 
see to it that none of his members help to run 
the lawless places. I fear that too often those 
places are run largely by church members and all 
this in what is supposed to be really and truly the 
most Christian nation on the face of the earth. 

We stand aghast, in utter astonishment and won- 
der, at what the more than seventy thousand min- 
isters of religion, pastors of churches, preachers 
of the gospel, and clergymen of all sorts and 
ranks are thinking about that they tolerate even 
in thought, such an awful state of affairs. My 
brethren in Christ, what are you going to do about 
it? The time has come when it is up to you, 
brethren, and may God help each one of you, to 
do your duty. How many times have you prayed, 
really prayed that God would save our country 
from the curse of rum? How many dollars have 
you given to help the temperance cause along? 
What would it mean to the tens of thousands who 
are engulfed in the black waters of intemperance, 
who feel the billows of temptation going over them 
and feel that for them there is no eye to pity, no 
hand reached out to save; what would it mean to 
such if the whole church of God stood firmly on 
its feet and engaged in a relentless warfare against 
this thing. Isn't this a part of the legitimate work 
of the churches? Is there any one thing which 
operates so successfully against the church, either 
in this or foreign lands as the traffic of strong 
drink? 

Ask the missionaries, both home and foreign 
if it is not a notorious fact that liquor sent from 
Christian America has debauched and ruined more 
pagan souls than our missionaries have saved, 
then why should not every man do his part in 
driving this evil from the land? As General Booth, 
of the Salvation Army, said so many times; "For 
God's sake do something; it will cost you money, 
it will cost you time, it may cost you your reputa- 
tion, but for God's sake do something." We won- 
der what all religious and church papers and our 
millions of circulated copies of Sunday school pub- 
lications signify when they have so little to say 
about this unmitigated curse and plague that af- 
flicts our people. Why should not all the true and 
moral and religious church members unite and 
enforce the law? It could be done, it must be done. 
Time will come when all moral, religious, God-fear- 
ing people will unite and enforce the law." Let 
the redeemed of the Lord say so, whom he hath 
redeemed from the hand of the enemy." — 107th Ps. 
Oh, that men would praise the Lord for His Good- 
ness and for His wonderful works to the children 
of men." Go awaken the church, and awaken the 
people, both the rich and the great. 

Again we say, brethren, may the Lord bless you 
mightily and be with you to clear your skirts from 
the blood of souls; for "cursed be he that doeth the 
work of the Lord deceitfully, and cursed be he 
that keepeth back his sword from blood." The 
Lord is on your side, you should not fear what 
man can do unto you. Make haste, God, to deliver 
us. 

Mrs. F. B. Barrier. 

Salisbury, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS PASSED BY THE CONFERENCE 
OF THE ANTI-SALOON LEAGUE AT WASH- 
INGTON, D. C. 

Whereas, the people of several states, numbering 
more than 44,000,000 in the aggregate, acting with- 
in their admitted rights and for the public welfare, 
have excluded by law the traffic in intoxicating 
liquors from more than two-thirds of the territory 
of the United States; and 

Whereas, Such laws are being systematically and 
persistently broken, brought into disrepute, and 
their effectiveness and stability impaired, through 
advertisements sent into such territory by means 
of the Federal mails and through shipments into 
such territory of intoxicating liquors under the 
cover and protection of the inter-state commerce; 
and 

Whereas, The Federal government daily collects 
revenue taxes from and issues receipts therefor 
to persons engaged in the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in such territory in defiance and violation 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE Page Five 



February 1st, 1912 



of the laws of the respective states forbidding the 
sales and thereby sanctions such- illicit traffic and 
encourages the defiance of such laws ; and 

Whereas, The States are without power to act 
in matters touching either the Federal mails, in- 
terstate commerce or the collection or levying of 
Federal revenue, the General Government alone 
having such power; 

Therefore, be it resolved, by this conference rep- 
resenting 39 states of the Union and convened pur- 
suant to a call heretofore made by 250 men of prom- 
inence in the public, social and civic life of the 
country ; 

That it is the duty of the Federal Government to 
withdraw the aid, protection and encouragement 
it is now giving to the infraction of such laws — 

1st. By the enactment of a law denying the use 
of the Federal mails to all such liquor advertise- 
ments. 

2nd. By ceasing to collect revenue taxes from 
or to issue revenue tax receipts to persons engaged 
i nthe sale of intoxicating liquors who are not duly 
licensed thereto under the laws of the State in 
which such sales are to be made. % 

3d. By the enactment of legislation withdrawing 
the character of interstate commerce from inter- 
state shipments of such liquors into prohibited 
territory within the several states. 

That is the high duty of the Federal govern- 
ment to uphold the sovereignty and sustain the 
sanctity of every law enacted by a State within its 
sphere and admitted rights. 

That, if the General government would have its 
laws respected and obeyed, it must do what it may 
to secure respect for and obedience to the duly 
enacted laws of the states. That it should continue 
to be the aider and abettor of the destruction of 
laws lawfully enacted by the free people of the 
States is intolerable and ought to cease. 

Be it aiso further resolved that we hereby urge 
upon all our people everywhere to do whatever 
they may or can do by way of request, petition or 
counsel to obtain action in this behalf at the pres- 
ent session of the Federal Congress. 

Signed: Rev. A. J. Barton, Dallas, Texas; Ex- 
Gov. J. Frank Hanly, Indianapolis, Ind.; Rev. Jas. 
Cannon, D.D, Richmond, Va.; Hon. Fred Caldwell, 
Oklahoma City, Oka.; Senator Charles Curtis, Sen- 
ator P. J. McCumber, U. S. Senate, Washington, D. 
C; Hon. Fred Jackson, Hon. Morris Shepherd, 
Hon. E. Y. Webb, House of Representatives, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Dr. S. E. Nicholson, Rev. E. C. Din- 
widdie, Rev. W. F. Crafts, Mrs. Margaret D. Ellis, 
Washington, D. C- 



TRINITY COLLEGE NOTES 

By W. P. Few 

On Wednesday morning, January 3, the College 
reopened for the New Year. Nearly all the stu- 
dents returned on time and a few new ones were 
admitted. The weather has been extremely cold, 
but we were pretty well prepared for it and, I am 
glad to say, we have suffered no hardships on ac- 
count of it. 

The mid-year examinations begin on January 19, 
and continue until February 1, when the spring 
term begins. The work of the students during the 
term now ending has been unusually good, and we 
expect to make better records than ever before. 

The debate council has arranged for two public 
debates to be held during the spring term. The 
first debate will be with the University of South 
Carolina, in Durham, on March 8th. The other de- 
bate will be with Swarthmore College during the 
second week in April. Last year the debate with 
Swarthmore was held in Durham and this year it 
will take place at Swarthmore. The same subject 
will be. debated with both institutions and is as 
follows: "Resolved, That Congress should enact 
a national incorporation law containing definite 
terms and restrictions, by compliance with which 
industrial corporations may have Federal Charters 
to engage in inter-state Commerce." 

The Literary Societies of Trinity College have 
accepted the invitation to send a representative 
to the state oratorical contest to be held under 
the auspices of the Inter-Collegiate Peace Associa- 
tion. The time and place for this contest has not 
been definitely decided upon. 

With the January issue of the South Atlantic 
Quarterly this publication has completed its tenth 
volume. The table of contents of the January is- 
sue is: 

1. Editorial: Ten Year's of the South Atlantic 
Quarterly. By W. H. Glasson. 



2. Was Poe a Drunkard? By Phillip Alexander 
Bruce. 

3. The Morocco Crisis of 1911. By Professor E. 
P. Turner, of the University of Michigan. 

4. Wililam Tecumseh Sherman as College Pres- 
ident. By Professor Walter L. Fleming, of Louis- 
iana State University. 

5. Loyalty to Ancestry in Literature. By Pro- 
fessor W. W. Comfort, of Cornell University. 

6. Lee and Psychography. By Gamaliel Brad- 
ford, Jr. 

7. William Pitt and the Recent Critics. By Dr. 
W. T. Laprade, of Trinity College. 

8. The Autobiography of Richard Wagner. By 
Professor W. H. Wannamaker. 

9. Book Reviews, by Prof. Mims, of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Dr. Bailey, of Cornell; Pro- 
fessor W. K. Boyd and Professor W; H. Glasson. 

The South Atlantic Quarterly has won a secure 
and in"uential place in this country. It is still 
not sufficiently appreciated in this state. It ought 
to command the active support of everybody who 
is interested in Southern progress and especially 
of every intelligent and patriotic North Carolinian. 

Rev. F. A. Bishop, who lately died in the city of 
Wilmington, was for many years a member of the 
Board of Trustees and throughout his life a loyal 
friend of Trinity College. His judgment may have 
sometimes been at fault but his whole heart was 
always with the College, and with his friendship, 
his progress, and his best efforts we always felt 
that he was back of us. This is the sort of friend- 
ship that really counts in the life of an institution, 
and it is not lost, but has now become a part of 
our great heritage from the past. 

"HE CUT NO ICE" 

By Rev. J. W. Williams 

Cutting ice is a very interesting thing to me. To 
stand by and see them harvest rapidly, great square 
chuncks of ice, and store it for watermelon time, 
and think of the lemonade, ice-cream, and cold wa- 
termelons next August is enough to inspire a 
writer. 

As I stood and watched the process I could not 
help but think of other days. They had a horse 
on the lake to plow the ice preparatory to cutting. 
The horse was hitched to an ice plow that marked 
off the ice in squares of near two feet. The horse 
refused to work. "He cut no ice." 

After a while that horse broke through the ice 
in water 35 feet deep and the workers had a hard 
time landing him. 

When a boy I knew a preacher that was really 
smart, and he knew it. He could preach a good 
sermon but always spoilt the job at the close by 
injecting something else besides the old gospel. 

The Presiding Elder advised with him, but he 
said that he was a better preaoher than the Pre- 
siding Elder and like the horse above spoken of 
would not work. 

He transfered — (broke through the ice in water 
over his head) and instead of getting better work, 
he was like a colored brother said to me about 
a sick man, "he done ot worser." "He cut no ice." 

I knew another young preacher several years ago 
with splendid gifts. He could perform beautifully 
in the pulpit and preach a great sermon. His 
friends said that he will rise to the top. 

But he committed his ermons to memory, and 
after awhile that sort of thing dried up, and left 
him only a plain, very ordinary preacher. He did 
not use his talent, but . another's talent, and he 
seemed to lose his own talent. Of course he took 
his place among the weaker set. "He cut no ice." 

I knew another preacher of good preaching abil- 
ity that rose to fill some of the best places. He 
got the "big head" and that uncontrolled temper 
increased as he increased. When he was sent to 
a ,very poor circuit from a Presiding Elder's Dis- 
trict, he could not understand it of course, as he 
was in his strength and surely thought that with 
a bishop's voice he would soon be presiding again 
at some District Conference. But did he? Never! 
"He cut no ice." 

Another preacher had very great gifts, and 
should have been among the first of his Confer- 
ence, but he* depended upon his pulpit gifts, and 
did not do the work assigned him. After awhile 
"no place wanted him" the Presiding Elder said — 
He lost out. "He cut no ice." 

I knew another great precher who began to 
preach Holiness and had a very great following, 
but the bishop and cabinet of presiding elders said 



that he was a "hobby man and would ruin the 
church." 

They changed him from the best church in his 
Conference, and assigned him to an old run down 
church that paid but little, but that man of God 
went to his work with the power of the Holy 
Ghost and the angels came and brought him wings, 
so that he could fly as never before, and on the 
wings of love he flew all over this country and his 
name is known and loved by .millions — "Hobby" 
said the bishop and presiding elders. 

"They cut no ice." 

I knew another preaoher who could hold great 
audiences spell-bound for hours — hardly had an 
equal as an orator in the United States, but some 
great men, in the church and out, took it into their 
heads that the preacher did not suit them therefore 
must be kept down. 

Did they succeed? 

No. 

When that preacher appeared before the public 
the fire that Moses saw in the bush was burning 
in his eyes and he spoke out boldly and defiantly 
for God. The church made him a bishop. 

The able critics "cut no ice." 

Corom, N. Y. 

A STUDY IN EDUCATION 

By Stonewall Anderson 

Continued from Page One 



must be depended upon to hold the whole volume 
ail our higher education up to the level of true 
morals and religious ideals and life. We have made 
no mistake in not depending upon the state insti- 
tutions to perform this high task. I do not mean 
to say that the education in the state universities 
is hot true to high moral and religious ideals but I 
do mean to say that there is no adequate means of 
keeping it so if the field were left to state schools 
alone. 

Without the religious educational foundations 
which have flourished, and are now flourishing in 
abundance in this nation, I do not see what ground 
of hope we should have in this matter. There has 
never been a day in the history of this country 
when a large majority of the young men and wo- 
men taking higher education were not doing so in 
religious institutions; and this is true today. To 
these schools is largely given the high task of 
leavening morally and righteously the whole lump 
of the educational process of our nation. They are 
doing that today. And while they are engaged in 
this work, they are, also true to every fundamental 
educational principle. They stand for broad and 
accurate scholarship, as well as for thorough dis- 
cipline and high character. It is given to those of 
us who believe in a genuinely Christian education, 
both for the good of our nation and for the advance- 
ment of the kingdom of God, to see to it that the 
institutions of the Church are firmly established, 
and that they increase in power and usefulness. 



The Executive Committee of the Board of Educa- 
tion, which is composed of Bishop E. E. Hoss, Dr. 
W. F. Tillett, Dr. J. W. Blackard, Dr. J. S. French, 
and the Seci etary of Education, met Wednesday af- 
ternoon in the office of the Board at the Publishing 
House. All the members of the committee were 
present. The time for holding the annual meeting 
of the Board "f Education was fixed for April 2. 
The meeting will be held in Nashville. 

Arrangements were made to hold an educational 
conference for the entire church sometime during 
next spring. This conference will probablv be held 
sometime in June in connection with the Biblical 
Institute eif. the \ anderbilt University. The Secre- 
tary of Education was instructed to pay the ap- 
propriations made by the Board last April in full; 
also to pay to the Vanderbilt University for the 
use of the Biblical Department for the current year 
$8,S80. 



IN FRONT OF YOUR DOOR 

I know that the Master commanded: 

"Go, bid all the nations to come!" 
But those who will carry the message 

Must be given the Gospel at home. 
And the sooner the glory will reach those 

Who sat in darkness before, 
If you faithfully garner the harvest 

That lieth in front of your door. 



February 1st, 1912 



1 » 

! From the Field 

NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— We are glad to see that our pastors in Win- 
ston-Salem have been preaching in the Salvation 
Army services. A good thing to do every time op- 
portunity is given. 1 

— We are glad to announce that Judge W. J. 
Montgomery, of Concord, submitted to an opera- 
tion last week and that the physicians are quite 
hopeful of his recovery. 

— Rev. L. T. Cordell, presiding elder of the Way- 
nesville District, announces that Rev. R. P. Wellons 
has been appointed to the Spring Creek Circuit. 
His postoffice address is Lee, N. C. 

— Mr. R. W. Sherrill and Miss Mabel Comann, 
daughter of. Rev. D. H. Coimann, of our Conference, 
were married on Monday, January 22nd, Rev. C. 
M. Pickens performing the ceremony. 

— We are publishing this week an itinerary of 
the state for Hon. John G. Wooley, the great advo- 
cate of temperance and prohibition. He should 
have a large hearing wherever he goes. 

— We are glad to note that Mr. J. D. Lineberger, 
Chairman of our Conference Church Extension 
Board, who has been quite ill at his home in Shelby, 
was able to go to Lincolnton last week to visit his 
daughter. 

— We learn with great pleasure that Brother 
Miles O. Sherrill, State Librarian, who fell and 
fractured his hip some two weeks ago, is now im- 
proving nicely, and we sincerely hope he may re- 
cover soon. 

— We congratulate President Harper and the 
trustees of Elon College as well as the Christian 
church, on their success in completing the special 
fund of $50,000 which began some time ago for 
the College. 

— North Carolina, according to the census figures, 
is the second state in the .union in the production 
of yarns. Massachusetts leads with 523,000,000 
yards and North Carolina comes second with 308,- 
000,000 yards. 

— Rev. J. A. Baldwin, of Charlotte, has been for 
some days visiting in northern cities in the inter- 
est of the Southern Industrial Institute which has, 
through his indomitable energy developed into a 
really great enterprise. 

— Mrs. A. J. Durham, formerly Miss Mattie Mae 
Connelly, died suddenly at her home in Acworth, 
Ga., on Sunday, January 21st.. She was the daugh- 
ter of the late J. B. Connelly, of Statesville, and 
was thirty-eight years old. 

—Mrs. J. J. Hill, mother of Mr. R. R. Hill, of 
this city, and long a devoted member of the Meth- 
odist church, died at her home in Asheville on 
Monday, January 22. She was 76 years old and 
had been ill for some time. 

— We note that many missionary societies at dif- 
ferent points in our Conference are consolidating, 
and we regard it as a wise movement. The Light 
Bearers and Golden Links, of Central Church, Con- 
cord, went together last week. 

Mrs. Thomas Hallyburton, aged 82, for many 
years a faithful member of the Methodist church, 
died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Emma 
Hemphill, at Nebo, last week. She lived long and 
well and her end was peaceful. 

— It was announced last week at the meeting of 
the deacons and elders of Orange Presbytry that 
Rev. J. F. Preston, Missionary to Korea, would sail 
on his return trip in a short time with fifteen volun- 
teers for mission work in Korea. 

— We regret to learn from the Shelby paper that 
Mrs. C. P. Roberts has been quite ill for some 
time and has been carried to Broad Oaks Sanitari- 
um, Morganton, for treatment. Mrs. Roberts is a 
sister of Rev. John H. Hall, of the North Carolina 
Conference. 

Mr. I. N. Biggerstaff, one of our most substantial 
laymen of Rutherford county, lost his home and 
contents at Forest City last Sunday night by fire. 
The family was at churoh and the origin of the 
fire is not known. There was no insurance and the 
loss is estimated at $5000.00. 

— Rev. W. F. Womble's sermon at Main Street 
Methodist church last Sunday on foreign missions 
is spoken of as one of the best he has yet preached 
in Reidsville. It was a practical discussion of the 
great commission and gave those who heard it food 
for daily reflection. — Webster's Weekly. 



WHITE HALL 

Rev. J. L. McNeer, pastor of the Aaheboro Cir- 
cuit, preached his first sermon at White Hall Sun- 
day, Jan. 7th. Bro. McNeer's sermon was very 
effective, and was delivered in a most loving and 
pleasing manner. The congregation was most fa- 
vorably impressed. All are well pleased with their 
pastor. He is a most excellent and able preacher. 

Agnes Henley 



WEST ASHEVILLE 

The records of two members of a family in West 
Asheville in attending Sunday School is worthy 
of note. Crawford Penland is credited with attend- 
ing the Sunday school of the Balm Grove Metho- 
dist church for 15 years without misssing a Sun- 
day. His brother, Orien Penland, has a record of 
twelve years continuous attendance with the ex- 
ception of only one Sunday. 

There are probably few Sunday schools in this 
State or any other State with the attendance record 
that this Sunday school has. Out of an enrollment 
of about 200 there were 59 who attended an aver- 
age of four times a month during last year. Of 
these, 16 attended 53 Sundays, or every Sunday in 
the year. There were six who were present 52 
Sundays. 

By classes the number present as many as 48 
Sundays are as follows: Class of J. L. Cook, one; 
J. C. Wallace, four; A. C. Reynolds, five; Miss Eula 
Buttrick, five; R. B. Edwards, five; Miss Estelle 
Kerr, four; Miss Clara Brown, five; Miss Mary 
Buttrick, four; Miss Mabel Chunn, three; Miss 
Emilee Buttrick, seven; Miss Nema Buttrick, 15. — 
Asheville Gazette-News. 



MOUNT AIRY METHODISM 

Mount Airy Methodism has its head up and its 
face to the future. Recently some indebtedness of 
long standing was removed, the notes publicly burn- 
ed. The Sunday school, the official board, and the 
several organized companies of elect women are 
all girding themselves for a year of abundant la- 
bor. 

Needless to say, the pastor is quite happy. He 
has lacked nothing, and his own heart is greatly 
encouraged. 

In addition to a splendidly officered Sunday 
School, and efficient official board, we are blessed 
with the presence of a progressive presiding elder, 
a beloved superannuate, and a sympathetic local 
preacher — R. M. Taylor, D. Vance Price, and J. A. 
Snow, respectively. 

Brother Price's health does not improve, but he 
is able to publish the Dixie Methodist and scold 
for his pastor when occasion offers. 

Brother Taylor was hindered from his work by 
sickness for some time in December. He is at 
work now, but may have to go to a hospital for 
treatment later on. 

We hope to report progress from time to time. 

W. H. Willis. 



THE CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL 

The following letter from Rev. J. L. Cunning- 
gim, director of our Correspondence school, will 
be of special interest to many of our readers. The 
younger preachers, especially, should take advan- 
tage of the opportunity offered them in this new 
arrangement of the course of studies. Dr. Cun- 
ninggim says: 

"Perhaps you will 'be interested to know that 
the Correspondence School, instead of giving a 
certificate for the completion of eaoh year's course, 
as heretofore, is now giving a certificate of gradu- 
ation for the entire four years' Conference course. 
This certificate is a copper and zinc etching on 
handsome vegetable parchment, and is quite an 
attractive testimonial of the four years' work. 
Those 'Who have not completed the Conference 
course in full by correspondence may desire to 
finish up the course and secure the certificate. 
Those who have successfully completed the course 
may secure the certificate, without charge on ap- 
plication to the Correspondence School. 

I am glad to inform you also, that the Board of 
Education, at its last meeting, authorized the Cor- 
respondence School to arrange a graduate course 
of study and to award a graduate certificate to 
those completing the course. In compliance with 
the action of the Board, the Correspondence School 
is now offering such a certificate to those who, in 
addition to the Conference Course of Study, com- 
plete as much as eight minors, or four majors, 
elected by the student himself from the University 



courses outlined in the Correspondence School Bul- 
letin. These courses in addition to entitling the 
student to the graduate certificate, will also be 
credited, subject to the conditions of the Biblical 
Department, toward the B. D. degree from Vander- 
bilt University. 



IS SHE THE OLDEST METHODIST IN OUR CON- 
FERENCE? 

Nancy, better known as Grandma Gardner, 
a member of our church here, was 97 years old 
last Monday, Jan. 15. She has been a Methodist 
since girlhood, more than 82 years. Let the breth- 
ren speak if they have a member who can surpass 
or equal this record. While Grandma is feeble 
she is able to go about the house and enjoys com- 
pany and has a good appetite. Only for the past 
two or three years her eyes have been too dim to 
read, yet her memory is a wonder. She is a walk- 
ing history of this part of the country for four 
score years, back to 1830 and more. She has been 
a great aid to her son, G. E. Gardner, and other at- 
torneys, in making up the jury in capital cases, 
since she is a real genealogist and knows where 
and how and who are kin "by blood or marriage." 

Grandma says her grandfather, Jas. Ander- 
son, from Ireland, fought in the revolution, or 
seven years' war. He was also the first Metho- 
dist west of the Blue Ridge. Therefore, he preceded 
Asbury in representing us in this mountain land. 

It is interesting to have her tell how eighty or 
more years ago she went as a child often to the 
old meeting house and would find old Brother Dil- 
lingham sitting on the front bench, with legs cross- 
ed and barefoot, singing very triumphantly "Oh Ab- 
salom, my son, Absalom, would God I had died for 
thee." I guess such a sight and sound would seem 
rather primitive to some of us in this day of 
screaming. It would be interesting to know how 
our Lord would compare the two. Grandma's 
companion was called to depart this life a number 
of years ago. During their pilgrimage together 
there were born to them nine children, only two 
of whom are living. One son, Mr. G. E. Gardner, 
of this place, and Mrs. G. W. McDowell, who is a 
member of Bethel Church, Asheville. 

God grant that as she looks toward the setting 
sun the way may grow even more bright until she 
shall meet her many friends and loved ones gone 
before in the home of the good and may wait there 
with, joy the coming of dear ones who yet linger 
on this side of the river. 

Her pastor, 

J. O. Ervin. 



A STUDY IN STATISTICS 

D. Atkins 

The assessments for the benevolences by dis- 
tricts per member are as follows: 

Asheville, $1.23; Charlotte, $1.00; Franklin, $.86; 
Greensboro, $.99; Morganton, $.71; Mt. Airy, $.82; 
N. Wilkesboro, $.82; Salisbury, ,$1.00; Shelby, $.85; 
Statesville, $.76; Waynesville, $1.00; Winston, $.83. 

Asheville District is assessed 23 cts. per member 
more than any other district, which would amount 
to $1,352 more than is meet on that basis as com- 
pared with the other highest. It is 40 cents per 
member more than the average of the whole Con- 
ference or $2,357 more than is meet on that basis. 
There is no sound reacon for this discrepancy. It 
is impossible to ascertain the exact relative finan- 
cial ability of the members of the church in the 
districts but in a general way it is not probable 
that the members who compose the Asheville Dis- 
trict are financially stronger than those on the 
others. We are not asked to give more than we 
ought, but the assessments are out of all propor- 
tion and there is injustice somewhere. 

It is generally understood that these assessments 
are made by the Joint Board of Finance on the 
basis of the salaries of the pastors for last year. 
By referring to the table of amounts paid last year 
for salaries per member we find a reason for the 
above-named discrepancy. 

Amount paid on pastors' salaries last year by 
districts per member: 

Asheville, $2.28; Charlotte, $2.12; Franklin, $1.42: 
Greensboro, $1.92; Morganton, $1.28; Mt. Airy, 
$1.35; N. Wilkesboro, $1.48; Salisbury, $1.93; Shel- 
by, $1.60; Statesville, $1.42; Waynesville, $1.79; 
Winston, $1.62. 

The Asheville District paid on salaries 60 cents 
per member more than the average of the Confer- 
ence and this explains why the assessments on 
this district are so out of proportion. The in- 
crease of assessments this year over last are: 



February 1st, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



Asheville, $593; Charlotte, $167; Franklin, $54; 
Greensboro, $382; Morganton, $1,015; Mt. Airy, 
$243; N. Wilkesboro, $41; Salisbury, $44; Shelby, 
$22; Statesville, $109; Waynes ville, $58; Winston, 
$452. 

It is very clear in what way these large differ- 
ences in the increase occurred. There was a cor- 
responding increase in pastors' salaries. The peo- 
ple of Asheville District have no right to feel hu- 
miliated. Rather they should feel elated over their 
achievements. For the last three years at least 
there has been a large and unusual increase in 
salaries every year. It was quite apparent that 
if we secured and held the preachers we needed, 
salaries must be increased. A campaign was in- 
augurated to that end. The people responded 
nobly and the results are very gratifying. The 
good work is still going on and this year will 
show gains equal to any other year. I am not com- 
plaining, neither would I boast, but I present for 
the consideration of the Conference, the various 
Boards, and especially our very faithful and effi- 
cient Board of Finance, whether the per cent of 
pastors' salaries is a proper basis on which to 
make the assessments to the districts or whether 
the membership should not also be taken into 
account. 

It will be conceded that nearly all of our smaller 
salaries are too small. The charges are able to 
pay more. It is not a question of ability. It is 
a question of "performing, the doing of it," and 
when a charge awakes to the necessity of provid- 
ing a legitimate support they should be perfectly 
free to do so without the fear of increased bur- 
dens on that -account from other sources. If the 
assessments are gauged by the salaries there might 
be in some cases a temptation to keep the salary 
down in order to keep the assessments down. 

We are laying plans for the full payment of 
all our assessments this year, and while we may 
not reach it in every case we will try to do our 
'best. Our people are loyal and true and with 
efficient leadership can pay the whole amount. 

One charge has raised the pastor's salary from 
$700 to $1,000, another from $700 to $750, another 
from $525 to $700. There are other advances and 
not a case of decrease. There is not a misfit any- 
where and the prospects for the year are fine 
every way. 



CONFERENCE BROTHERHOOD 

Assessment No. 4. Those who have paid this 
assessment since my last report are as follows: 
M. H. Vestal, H. K. Boyer, J. J. Barker, J. B. Car- 
penter, James Wilson, H. M. Blair, L. A. Falls, M. 

F. Moores, D. H. Coman, A. W. Jacobs, R. L. Mel- 
ton, J. G. W. Holloway, T. F. Marr, D. M. Litaker, 
J. B. Tabor, R. E. Atkinson, J. P. Hipps, L. T. 
Mann, J. F. Kirk, T. S. Ellington, J. F. England, J. 

E. Thompson, J. W. Moore, J. E. Woosley, J. C. 
Mock, W. F. Elliott, R. L. Doggett, A. G. Loftin, R. 

G. Tuttle, C. E. Steadman, J. W. Jones, W. M. 
Curtis, P. H. Brittain, T. S. Coble, J. F. Armstrong, 

H. Turner, C. M. Pickens, R. W. Pickens, J. A. 
Wiggins, A. T. Bell, W. S. Hales, D. S. Richard- 
son, J. M. Downum, R. D. Sherrill, J. H. West, G. 
H. Detwiler, B. F. Hargett, E. L. Bain, T. C. Jor- 
dan, W. T. Albright, W. W. Bays, C. A. Wood, J. B. 
Craven. Total clerical who have paid this assess- 
ment, 101. Laymen— J. S. Carr, E. A. Cole, I. F. 
Craven, J. W. Gulledge, C. H. Trowbridge. A few 
of the brethren have not paid the assessment. I 
hope they understand that they can reinstate their 
membership at any time between this and the gen- 
eral conference, but I hope they also understand 
that in case of their death after the 23rd of Jan- 
uary, no assessment can be called for their benefit 
until this assessment is paid. Let them pay up 
this assessment as soon as possible. 

Assessment No. 5. The following have paid this 
assessment since my last report: M. H. Vestal, H. 
K. Boyer, J. J. Barker, J. B. Craven, J. B. Carpen- 
ter, H. M. Blair, R. L. Melton, J. W. Williams, J. 

F. Kirk, F. H. Wood, J. F. England, E. Myers, W. 

F. Elliott, J. W. Jones, W. M. Curtis, J. J. Eads, 

G. H. Detwiler, A. E. Wiley, T. C. Jordan, C. A. 
Wood. Total clerical members which have paid 
this assessment to date, Jan. 29, 31. Laymen — J. 
S. Carr, E. A. Cole, I. F. Craven, J. W. Gulledge, 
and C. H. Trowbridge. The time for the payment 
of this assessment will expire at midnight of Feb. 
26. This assessment is to be kept on hand for 
the purpose of paying the next death claim. 

C. M. Pickens, Sec.-Treas. 

Lenoir. N. C. 



NOTES FROM TRINITY COLLEGE 

Following a custom of long standing at Trinity 
College a series of meetings will be held beginning 
Sunday, February 4. The meeting this year will be 
under the leadership of Gilbert T. Rowe of the 
class of 1895, one of the College's most gifted and 
devoted sons. This will be an occasion of great 
importance to North Carolina Methodism and will 
of course enlist the interest, the sympathies, and 
the prayers of all our people. 

* * • • 

On February 22 of each year a civic celebration 
is held here for the purpose of cultivating the vir- 
tues of patriotism and good citizenship. The ad- 
dress this year will be made by President W. L. 
Poteat, of Wake Forest College. 

* * * » 

Mr. W. W. Card, director of the gymnasium, has 
been this week at the Baptist Orphanage at Thom- 
asville to introduce there the game of basket ball. 
So long and so wisely devoted to the promotion of 
soundness of body in connection with soundness of 
mind and soundness of character, Mr. Card, along 
with the entire College, derives peculiar pleasure 
from being able to render the sort of service for 
which he was called on at Thomasville. 



APPOINTMENTS OF HON. JOHN G. WOCLLEY 

The North Carolina Anti-Saloon League has just 
arranged with Hon. John G. Woolley to make an 
itinerary over this State of two weeks following 
the State Anti-Saloon League Convention at Ral- 
eigh. Already appointments have been fixed for 
him and most of them have been accepted. He will 
be accompanied on this trip throughout the State 
by Mr. Davis, Superintendent of the Anti-Saloon 
League. 

His appointments are as follows: 



Jan. 29th, 1912 Burlington 

Jan. 30th, 1912 Reids ville 

Jan. 31st, 1912 High Point 

Feb. 1st, 1912 Winston-Salem 

Feb. 2nd, 1912 Statesville 

Feb. 3rd, 1912 Salisbury 

Feb. 4th, 1912 Charlotte, (two services.) 

Feb. 5th 1912 Shelby 

Feb. 6th, 1912 Gastonia 

Feb. 7th, 1912 Concord 

Feb. 8th, 1912 Monroe 

Feb. 9th, 1912 Fayetteville 

Feb. 10th, 1912 Goldsboro 

Feb. 11th, 1912 New Bern, (two services.) 

Feb. 12th, 1912 Washington 

Feb. 13th, 1912 Elizabeth City 



AN INVITATION TO SOUTHERN METHODISTS 

The second General Convenetion of the Laymen's 
Missionary Movement of the Southern Presbyter- 
ian Church will be held in Chattanooea February 
6-8, and plans are on foot to make this probably 
the greatest gathering of Southern Presbyterian 
laymen ever held. More than forty of the strong- 
est missionary speakers of the day will take part 
in the program, among whom may be mentioned J. 
Campbell White and Robert E. Speer, each of 
whom has a world-wide reputation as a missionary 
leader and speaker. There will be also a number 
of missionaries representing Africa, China and Ko- 
rea. John R. Pepper of Memphis, President of the 
Laymen's Missionary Movement of the M. E. 
Church, South, will extend fraternal greetings on 
behalf of the men of our Church. 

A large auditorium has been secured and a part 
of it will be set aside for delegates from other 
denominations. A cordial invitation is extended 
to the men of Southern Mtehodism, clerical and 
lay, to attend the Convention and get the benefit 
of all its sessions. 

It is highly desirable that a large number of our 
men, preachers and laymen^ should attend this 
splendid convention and get in touch with the 
spirit and methods that bave made possible the 
exceptionally fine work in the line of missions 
that our Southern Presbyterian brethren are doing. 
The office of the Laymen's Missionary Movement 
of the M. E. Church, South, 810 Broadway, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., will be glad to get into correspondence 
at once with any of our Southern Methodist men 
who may think of attending. 



"Get the best out of each day that you can and 
soon the black clouds will fade away and life will 
be worth living." 



TO OUR CHURCH FRIENDS 

If you receive a sample copy of the Advocate this Is 
an Invitation to subscribe. We are sending out many 
samples, and we trust many will decide to send in 
their subscriptions at once. Send money direct to us 
or hand to your pastor. 



OUR ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

Reports of new subscribers and renewals sent in by 



pastors to date, January 30. 

Renewals New 

Asheville District 

Rev. J. O. Ervin 9 1 

Total — 9 — 1 

Charlotte District 

Rev. G. D. Herman 1 1 

Rev. W. L. Sherrill 8 

Rev. W. C. .Tones 1 

Total —10 — 1 

Franklin District 

Rev. J. F. Starnes 4 

Total — 4 

Greensboro District 

Rev. S. T. Rarber 1 

Rev. J. T. Stover 5 

Rev. A. L. Aycock 4 3 

Rev. W. F. Womble 1 2 

Spring Garden 1 

Rev. W. R. Ware 2 

Rev. O. P. Ader 2% 

Rev. E. K. McLarty 2 

Total —13 — 8% 

Morganton District 

Rev. D. S. Richardson 1 

Rev. R. E. Hunt 1 

Total — 1 — 2 

Mount Airy District 

Rev. Z. V. .Ton n son 2 

Rev. .T. M. Falser 1 

Rev. G. W. Williams 1 

Total — 2 — 2 

North Wilkesboro District 

Rev. J. F. McSwain 1 

Rev. H. V. Clark 1 

Total — 1 — 1 

Salisbury District 

Rev. J. W. Clegg 1 

Rev. W. T. Albright 1 

Rev. G. A. Harley 1 

Rev. J. P. Rodgers 2 

Rev. G. A. Stamper 1 

Rev. R. L. Fnrbls 1 

Rev. F. W. Dlhble 1 

Rev. W. B. Shinn 1 

Total — 7 — 2 

Shelby District 

Rev. J. H. Robertson 1 

Rev. T. J. Rogers 1% 

Rev. W. B. Davis 1 

Rev. J. F. Harrelson 1 

Rev. E. N. Crowder 1 1 

Total — 3 — 3% 

Statesville District 

Rev. E. Myers 1 

Rev. J. P. Davis 1 

Rev. T. E. Wagg 1 

Rev. C. M. Pickens 1 

Rev. J. W. Kennedy 1 

Rev. E. E. Yates 1 

Rev. J. J. Eads 1 

Rev. J. J. Edwards 3 

Total — 7 — 3 

Waynesville District 

Rev. J. H. Green 2 

Rev. T. S. Coble 1 1 

Rev. C. M. Carpenter 1 

Rev. M. F. Monres 2 

Rev. C. S. Kirkpatrick 2 

Total — 6 — 3 

Winston District 

Rev. L. T. Hendren 1 

Rev. J. T. Ratledge 2 3 

Rev. F. L. Townsend 1 

Rev. A. G. Loftin 2 

Rev. E. L. Bain 1 

Rev. A. W. Plyler 3 

Total — 6 — 7 

Grand total —65 —37 



OUR PRIZE OFFER 

1. To the pastor or layman sending in the largest 
number of new subscribers (not less than thirty) dur- 
ing the month of February, we propose to give a cash 
prize of $15.00. These must all be in by sunset on 
Thursday, February 29th, accompanied by the cash. 
We mean yearly subscribers, amounting to not less 
than $45.00. 

2. To the pastor or layman sending in the largest 
number of renewals during February, (not less than 
thirty) we will give a cash prize of $10.00. 

All must be yearly subscriptions and the money 
must be paid in by the date designated in the terms 
of the contest, and the contestant must be personally 
responsible for all names entered on this account. 

Let the good work begin at once and continue until 
we have at least 10,000 subscribers, as we ought to 
have. 



In sending lists please do not send names of persons 
who do not offer any prospect of becoming subscribers. 
Be sure also to give street addresses where there is a 
city delivery and be careful to give the number of the 
route where there is rural free delivery. Also follow 
the sample copies with the canvass. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 1st, 1912 



Foreign Mission Department 



Mr». D. M. Litaker, Press Superintendent, Hickory, N. C. 



* 

I 

•«* 



President 

Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson Greensboro 

Honorary Vice-President 

Mrs. J. E. Ray Asheville 

First Vice-President 

Mrs. G. G. Harley Asheville 

Second Vice-President 

Mrs. L. H. Martin Greensboro 

Third Vice-President 

Mrs. R. R. Alley Greensboro 

Fourth Vice-President 

Mrs. D. B. Coltrane Concord 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. M. H. Stewart Charlotte 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. L. W. Crawford Winston-Salem 

Treasurer 

Mrs. P. N. Peacock Salisbury 

Auditor 

Mr. A. L. Smoot Salisbury 

Superintendent of Supplies 

Miss Alice Smith Asheville 

Press Superintendent 

Mrs. D. M. Litaker Hickory 

District Secretaries 

Asheville District Mrs. W. R. Harris 

Charlotte District Mrs. J. J. Crow 

Franklin Dlstrlot Miss Laura Jones 

Greensboro District. .Mrs. A. E. Forrlham 
MorRanton District. .Mrs. M. B. Goodwin 

Mt. Airv District Mrs. T. W. Field 

Nnrth Wilkeshoro ..Mrs. W. F. TroRrlon 

Salisburv District Mrs. D. A. Beaver 

Shelby District Mrs. B. T. Morris 

Ptatesville District Mrs. D. J. Kimball 

Wavnes'ville District. .Mrs. M. F. M^ores I 
Winston District Mrs. Frank Martin , 

■ i 



readers this week our treasurer's re- 
port for the last quarter. Auxiliaries 
could spend .a profitable hour studying 
this report. Compare your district 
with the others and see where you 
stand. 

Many thanks are due our faithful 
and painstaking treasurer for these 
reports which come to her from time 
to time. — Editor. 



FEBRUARY 

February took its name from Februa 
the goddess who presided at the Ro- 
man feast of purification; but our Sax- 
on fathers called it Sprout-Kale, or 
the month in whirh they sprouted cab- 
bages and other vegetables. They af- 
terwards changed it to Sol-Monath, or 
Sun Month, because the sunshine of 
spring iwas approaching. In the old 
Saxon pictures February was repre- 
sented as a vine dresser in the act 
of pruning his trees. A more common 
emblem was that of a man clad in 
white robes with a wreath of snow- 
drops around his temples and a burn- 
ing candle in his hand. 



FROM MONROE 

Following the general policy sug- 
gested for our Woman's Missionary 
work the Home and Foreign Societies 
of Central Methodist church, Monroe, 
were united at a call meeting of both 
societies on Monday, Jan. 22nd. 

It is thought that better work will 
be accomplished as a result of the un- 
ion. 

The following officers were elected 
to serve for 1912: 

President — Mrs. L. N. Presson. 

1st Vice-President — Mrs. W. J. 
Rudge. 

2nd Vice-President — Mrs. Atha Stev- 
ens. 

3rd Vice-President — Mrs. J. H. 
Weaver. 

4th Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. 
Heath. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Walter 
Crowell. 

Corresponding Secretary Home De- 
partment — Miss Annie Stewart. 

Corresponding Secretary Foreign 
Department — Mrs. R. F. Beasley. 

Treasurer Home Department — Mrs. 
Roscoe Phifer. 

Treasurer Foreign Department — 
Mrs. J. J. Crow. 

Agent for Missionary Voice and Lo- 
cal Press Work — Mrs. Eugene Ash- 
craft. 

Cor. Secretary — Mrs. Roland Beas- 
ley. 



We are glad to note that Mrs. J. 
H. Weaver, of Monroe, who has been 
seriously ill for several weeks has re- 
covered and is now able to be out. 



OUR TREASURER'S REPORT 

The women of our constituency 
should feel proud of the fact that dur- 
ing the past year (10 months) the sum 
of $15,279.09 was paid into our treas- 
ury. We are glad to have for our 



PARLIAMENTARY RULES TO BE 
OBSERVED IN MONTHLY 
MEETING 

1. The president shall take the 
chair promptly at the hour appointed 
for the meeting and should open the 
exercises by saying: "The society 
will please come to order." 

2. Afted devotional exercises con- 
sisting of Scripture reading and prav- 
»r, she opens the business session bv 
saving: "The Recording Secretary 
win please call the roll." Next: "The 
Recording Secretary will please read 
the minutes." If the Secretary is ab- 
sent, some one should be appointed to 
take her place temporarily. When the 
minutes are read, the President should 
say: "Are there any corrections? If 
not. the -minutes stand approved af 
read." If there are any corrections 
they should be made during the read- 
ing or at its close, and the President 
should then say: "The minutes, as 
corrected, stand approved." 

3. The President now says: "Let 
the Corresponding Secretarv give her 
report." The Treasurer's report 
should then be read and acted upon. 

4. Any one desiring to sav anything 
or to make a 'motion should rise and 
address the Presidpnt, saving: "Mad- 
am President." She waits till thp 
President recognizes her bv her name 
Then rhe goes on to sneak or make 
a motion. 

Motions 

1. All business should be brought 
before an assembly by a motion. When 
a member makes a motion, it should 
not be debated or acted on unless it 
has been seconded. 

2. When a motion is seconded, the 
President should distinctly state the 
motion and say: "Are there any re- 
marks?" If no remarks are offered, 
then the President should put the 
question thus: "All who are in favor 
of the motion will say 'Aye.' " When 
those in favor have voted, the Presi- 
dent should say, "All who are opposed 
say 'No,' " and should then announce 
that the motion is carried or lost, as 
the case may be. If there are any re- 
marks, the above question should be 
put as soon as the debate closes. 

3. Any motion can be amended by 
adding to, inserting or striking out a 
part; but the amendment cannot be 
acted upon unless seconded. 

4. An amendment should always be 
voted on before the original motion. 
If lost, then the original motion is 
considered; but if carried, the Presi- 
dent should say: "All who are in 
favor of the motion as amended will 
say 'Aye,' " etc. 

5. An amendment can be offered to 
an amendment, but no further amend- 
ment is in order. When an amend- 
ment to an amendment is offered, it 
must be acted on first; • then the 
amendment must be acted on, and 
then the original motion. 

6. When any member notices a 
breach of order she can rise and say, 
"I rise to a point of order," which she 
must state without debate, when the 
President decides at o'nee whether the 
language used was "in order." 

7. When a member is dissatisfied 
with a decision of the President, she 
may appeal from the decision, saying: 
"I appeal from the decision of the 
Chair." If seconded, the Presidem 
shall say, "Shall the decision of the 
Chair stand?" take the vote without 



any debate, and announce the result. 
Either a majority or a tie vote sus- 
tains the Chair. 

Committees 

1. A committee usually consists of 
three or five members, and ordinarily 
is appointed by the President. 

2. The first person named by the 
President is considered the chairman 
of the committee. 

3. When a committee is expected 
to report at the meeting they ask the 
President for leave to retire. When 
ready to report, the chairman reads 
the entire report, and some member 
should move that the report be ac- 
cepted. If carried, this simply dis- 
charges the committee, but does not 
idopt their suggestions, if they make 
suggestions. In that case another mo- 
tion is necessary — namely, to adopt — 
for accepting a report is not adopting 
it as the action of the entire body. 
Frequently the motion (and this is 
the preferable form) is, "I move that 
we accept and adopt the report," in 
which case no further motion is neces- 
sary. 

4. When a committee to nominate 
officers is ready to report, the Presi- 
dent should ask another to take the 
chair, unless she has most positively 
refused to serve for another term and 
is sure that she will not be renomi- 
nated. 

5. While business is going on no 
one should engage in private conver- 
sation without express permission; 
nor should members address one 
another, nor any person present, but 
through the presiding officer. 

6. In all times of perplexity the 
President should remember the advice 
of a great writer on parliamentary 
'aw, that "the great purpose of all rules 
is to subserve the will of the assembly 
rather than to restrain it, to facilitate 
and not to obstruct the expression of 
their deliberate sense." 



Roots 

Barks Herbs 

That have great medicinal power, are 
raised to their highest efficiency, for 
purifying and enriching the blood, as 
they are combined in Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla. 

40,366 testimonials received by actual 
count in two years. Be sure to take 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Get it today in usual liquid form or 
chocolated tablets called Sarsatabs. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

I. Devotional exercises from the 
Yearbook or Missionary Voice. 

II. Business. 

(1) Minutes of last meeting. 

(2) Report of First Vice-President. 

(3) Report of Second Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

(4) Report of Third Vice-President. 

(5) Report of Fourth Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

(6) Report of Corresponding Sec- 
retary. 

(7) Report of Treasurer, collection 
of dues, etc. 

(8) Report of the Press Superin- 
tendent and Agent for Missionary 
Voice. 

(9) Report of Superintendent of 
Supplies. 

(Each report should be short, pre- 
sented in writing, and turned over to 
the Recording Secretary after it had 
been read.) 

III. Literary program from Year- 
book or Missionary Voice. 



YOU ARE INVITED 

To join the Advocate Piano Club. 
The plan is sensible economical and 
convenient. Club members not only 
save money on their pianos, but are 
protected and even insured in every 
particular so that dissatisfaction is 
impossible. Study the club plan care- 
fully and you cannot fail to see that 
it represents an unusual opportunity. 
Those who have already joined and 
have received their pianos express 
themselves as "Delighted with the 
pianos and the plan." 

The club gives you the benefit of 
the "purchasing power of its one hun- 
dred members." This means a saving 
of about one-third in the purchase 
price of your piano. Terms are made 
to suit the convenience of the indivi- 
dual member. The life insurance fea- 
ture is ideal. .It is well worth your 

I while to investigate the club carefully. 

; Write for catalog and full particulars 
Address Ludden & Bates Advocate 

\ Club Dept., Atlanta, Ga. 



No Soaking 
No Picking 



No Boiling 
No Fussing 



Economical 
Strengthening Food 

Codfish has more muscle and strength- 
building elements in proportion to its 
cost than any other ordinary food except 
stew-meat, wheat flour, oats and beans. 

Burnham 8 Morrill 
Fish Flakes 

10c — two sizes — 15c 

Only the finest Cod— cooked while fresh 
from the sea — mildly salted — immediately 
packed in air-tight tins and ready for instant 
use in preparing delicious FISH CAKES, 
SALADS, CHOWDER, HASH and other 

fresh fish dainties. Will keep in any climate. 

Sold by grocers everywhere — or mail us 1 0c 
and receive a full-size 1 0c package, prepaid. 

FREE— Mrs. Janet McKtnjie Hill's 
booh of special rtcipts on regutsl. 

BURNHAM & MORRILL CO. 
Portland, Maine. U. S. A. 



If it's Gardner's it's Good 




Agent for 

Cypher's 
Incubators 
Brooders 

and 
Supplies 

Gardner's 

DRUG STORE 



E FIRE BRICK ■ 

For Furnaces. Factories. Cotton Mills, Lumber 
Mills, Lime Kilns, Residences and other bulld- 
Ingsofevery description. Specialsbapesmade 
to order. Delivered prices quoted to any 
point In United States. Factory, Killlan, S. C. 

WRITE FOR PR1CESTO-DAY! 
RILL1AN FIRE BRICK CORPORATION, 
Charleston, S. C 



TtDADCV Treated. Quick relief. Be. 
JsKlrA ijX moves swelling: and short 
breath in a few days, usually 
gives entire relief 16 to 45 days and effects cure 
20 to 60 days. Write for trial treatment Kree. 
, Or. U. It. GREEil'a 90;iS, Bui H, liLA-N'TA. fiV 



February 1st, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Home Mission Department 

Conducted by Mrs. W. L. Nicholson 



THE PRICE OF POWER 

Love watches near the place of powei, 
Meeting thine awful trial hour. 
Ask not deliverance from the fire, 
But 'hold thyself to the desire 
For gift of power. 

When glows the furnace at white heat 
And all the furies seem to meet, 
Dare not to even whisper low 
A prayer for the release from woe 
But wait for power. 

When in the flame the life is tossed 
And all the brightest hopes seem lost, 
Forth from the seething depths will 
rise, 

Wreathed in the radiance of the skies 
The heaven-sent power. 

— Mary R. Baldwin. 



THE PRICE OF USEFULNESS. 

By Rolfe Hunt 

A young man who started out zeal- 
ously in religious service complaint, 
thus: "I am disappointed to find how 
few take hold heartily of the work. 
I am amazed to find the selfishness 
and downright stinginess of some that 
I grew up to regard as perfect. There 
are some that I used to think were 
all right that are full of deceit, and 
will ruin you to carry a point. I am 
perplexed and hardly know what to 
think or whether to go on or not.' 
There are some older persons who la- 
ment in a similar strain. It has not 
been long since a mature preacher 
admitted that he had become some- 
what lukewarm and 'had fallen short 
of his best effort the past year be- 
cause some others had done so poorly 
as to discourage him. Some imagine 
that they better conditions by renounc- 
ing all the churches and becoming cen- 
sorious. It is well for us to admit 
candidly that conditions are not all 
ideal. Would that all men were what 
they should be, and that every church 
was perfect in its membership and 
administration! 

But let us stop right here and rea- 
son a bit before we proceed another 
step. There are those who are just 
what they profess to be and just what 
the Scriptures demand of men. These 
are made what they are by believing 
in Jesus Christ and living by his word. 
These are the best people on earth; 
and J f all were like them, everything 
would be all right. Such people are 
in the churches, and the church has 
been the means of making them what 
they are. Remember, further, that 
despair is a poor remedy for existing 
evils, no matter what the evils and 
no matter where found. Despair can 
but hasten evil conditions on to ruin. 
Be it remembered, too, that discour- 
agement is the beginning of despair. 
He who would lead a fruitful life must 
at the outset count the cost, and must 
throughout his career be willing to 
pay the price of usefulness without 
hesitation. He that doubteth is damn 
ed, to begin with. There is no place 
for faltering, and hesitating in the life 
of him who "would be a Christian hero 
and shine as the stars forever. He 
must get his consent to obey no voice 
unless it be in harmony with the di- 
vine One. Wihen that Voice says, 
"Stand still," no matter what the sur- 
roundings, no matter how conditions, 
may appeal for activity, one must be 
as undismayed as Moses and as calm- 
ly await the salvation of Jehovah. 
When that Voice says, "Go forward," 
one must trustfully advance, though 
his feet be dampened by the waves of 
a seemingly impassable sea. 

We would say to all Christian work- 
ers, albeit we must say it sadly, that 
you must be prepared to encounter in- 
difference, and sometimes even oppo- 
sition, where you have the right to ex- 
pect most loyal and hearty co-opera- 
tion. Some of those upon whom you 
rely as lifelong friends, and to whom 



you have pointed some immature 
young souls for models, will treat 
with silent contempt your most earnest 
appeals for the noblest causes in the 
severest crises, not troubling them- 
selves even to speak a word or write 
a line of encouragement in your lone- 
ly struggles. Yes, we must be pre- 
pared even for unjust criticism and 
cruel opposition. Take Spurgeon, the 
great preacher and effective pastor, 
building up by laborious toil the Pas- 
tors' College and the Stockwell Or- 
phanages for the public good. While 
th«re were many to appreciate, yet 
there were others to abuse him and 
to reflect upon his integrity. Take 
Talmadge or Beecher or any other 
great preacher of recent years or of 
ancient times, and you will notice that 
each of them had his adversaries and 
his difficulties to face. Take any man 
who has obtained eminence in any 
other calling, and it is the same way. 
Wherever a human being has amount- 
ed to anything, he has incurred the 
envy or displeasure of somebody and 
has aroused Satan to activity. The 
Christian hero must be prepared to 
endure all indifference or scorn, and 
sometimes to walk alone, with no ap 
preciative companionship but the In- 
visible. 

Furthermore, the man who would 
be useful must not complain. To speak 
of hardships often increases them. 
Many times he must suffer in silence. 
Perchance amidst his sorest trials the 
world •will imagine that the Servant 
of God is occupying the easiest of po- 
sitions and envy him. Amid all his 
trials he must look above the stars, 
refresh his spirit with the joy of Him 
who sits upon the throne, and when 
he is brought as a lamb to the slaugh- 
ter be dumb. 

The way of usefulness will be hard 
sometimes, but there are ample com- 
pensations. In enduring the trials of 
a useful life we enjoy the blessedness. 
After all, the useful man is the hap- 
piest of men. He has an unspeakable 
joy, and he knows that the "crowning 
day is coming" when, like His Lord, 
"he shall see of the travail of his soUl 
and shall be satisfied." 

Atlanta, Ga. 



The little poem and the prose article 
were chosen by the editor not merelj 
as fillers but because of the great les 
sons taught. So many professing 
Christians, really good people long tc 
be useful and be a power in the relig 
ious and yet are unwilling to "pay the 
price." 

"For whosoever will save his life 
shall lose it; and whosoever shall 
lose his life for my sake shall find it." 
They frequently spend much of their 
time thinking about themselves 
and wondering at their lack of fruit 
fulness. Now before one can under- 
stand the depth of meaning in God's 
plans and promises, there must be 
some larger thing to look upon than 
self can give. The search for mere 
endowment of our lives with gifts can 
never long content us. The world is 
a smaller thing than the heart of God's 
child. Whatever we seek, whether it 
be wealth, or power, or pleasure, or 
even the thoughts and affections of 
the heart, we come soon to the limit of 
content. The child of God can find 
rest only in the heart of God. All lit- 
erature is full of testimonies to this 
inadequacy of earth to satisfy a hu- 
man soul and put to slep its longings. 
Such a poem as Tennyson's "Palace 
of Art" takes for its theme the effort 
to find satisfaction in the highest 
beauties and gifts of the creative im- 
agitation. The treasures are collected 
but the dissatisfaction is not stilled. 
The fated heart is not at rest. It 
must turn to God and the work of 
God as instrument of help for others 
before it can enjoy what man or God 
has in the fullest measure. 



Believing that the constituency Oi 
our Conference Society will be benefit- 
ted by a full and free discussion of 
"Union" of the Auxiliary and Confer- 
ence societies, the editor wishes to 
state that from now until the Annual 
meeting the space given to the Home 
Mission Society will be freely given to 
the presentation of the subject. Ar- 
ticles presenting both sides of the 
question will be welcomed. Every ad- 
vantage and disadvantage deserves 
consideration. Next week, Mrs. Marr, 
our Conference President, will write 
an article and it is hoped that this 
will be followed by something from 
the pen of each Conference Officer, 
District Secretary and many others. 
Study and pray much about it. 



The following on the Forward Move- 
ment is taken from the February Bul- 
letin: 

THE FORWARD MOVEMENT CAM- 
PAIGN 

The Forward Movement Campaign 
will be pushed with vigor, especially 
during the early part of the year. A 
series of special meetings will be held 
throughout the church for the purpose 
of bringing the facts of missions more 
clearly before our people, and of rous- 
ing the church to meet its present 
splendid opportunity to really Chris- 
tianize our own great country and to 
give the gospel to the whole world in 
this generation. In these meetings 
there will be a discussion of the best 
methods of work. Returned mission- 
aries and deaconnesses will give mes- 
sages fresh from the fields. 

There will be three kinds of -meet- 
ings held: 

1. Large Institutes at three or four 
places in a Conference, men and wo- 
men working toarether, presenting all 
phases of the field work. 

2. Institutes for the Woman's Work 
held in some six or eight places in a 
Conference where women from neigh- 
boring churches can attend. 

3. Forward Movement meetings in 
every church. 

There are two groups of workers for 
the large Institutes. The first group 
consists of Dr. W. W. Pinson, Dr. C. F. 
Reid, Miss Mabel Head, who will carry 
on the work in the Holston Conference 
March 1st to 15th, and in the North 
Georgia Conference, March 17th to 
31st. These workers will be in small 
groups during the month of February. 
\s helpers in the above named meet- 
ings will be Mrs. J. P. Campbell, of 
Korea; a deaconess, and Rev. M. Dick- 
3y, of Brazil. 

Group No. 2 is composed of Rev. 
K H. Rawlings, Rev. G. B. Winton and 
Miss Daisy Davies. Their helpers 
will be Miss Layona Glenn of Brazil, 
a deaconess, and Rev. Hager of Japan. 
This group will work in North Alaba- 
ma January 25th to February 9th; in 
Tennessee Conference February 9th 
to 21st; in Memphis Conference Feb- 
ruary 24th to March 8th; in St. Louis 
Conference March 21st to April 1st. 

Simultaneous meetings for Woman's 
Work are being planned in fifteen oth- 
er Conferences during February and 
March. To carry on this work there 
will be a regular force of volunteer 
workers who will give a few weeks of 
time to such field work. Definite an- 
nouncement of these meetings will be 
made soon. Every missionary woman 
in the Conferences where these meet- 
ings are held should feel an obligation 
to secure a good attendance. 

In addition to the above meetings 
every church will be .asked to hold 
rallies to plan for more effective work 
the coming year. Suggestive outlines 
for programs will be sent out for such 
meetings. In some instances several 
churches may unite in this work. 



You will be glad that you stopped 
long enough every day to read care- 
fully, and with a prayer in your heart, 
some part of God's message to those 
He loves. 

You will be glad that men have said 
all along your way: "I know I can 
trust him; he is true as steel." 



Smoke of Herbs 

Cures Catarrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 

This preparation of herbs, leaves, 
flowers and berries (containing no to- 
bacco or habit-forming drugs) is eith- 
er smoked in an ordinary clean pipe 
or smoking tube, and by drawing the 
medicated smoke into the mouth and 
inhaling into the lungs or sending it 
out through the nostrils in a perfectly 
natural way, the worse case of Catarrh 
can be eradicated. 

It is not unpleasant to use, and at 
the same time is entirely harmless, 
and can be used by man, woman or 
child. 

Just as catarrh is contracted by 
breathing cold or dust and ger-laden 
air, ust so this balmy antiseptic smok- 
ing remedy goes to all the affected 
parts of the air passages of the head, 
nose, throat and lungs. It can readily 
be seen why the ordinary treatments 
such as sprays, ointments, salves, 
liquid or tablet medicines fail — they 
do not and can not reach all the af- 
fected parts. 

If you have catarrh of the nose, 
throat or lungs, chocking, stopped-up 
feeling, colds, catarrhal headaches; 
if you are given to hawking and spit- 
ting, this simple yet scientific treat- 
ment should cure you. 

An illustrated book which goes 
thoroughly into the whole question of 
the cause, cure and prevention of ca- 
tarrh will, upon request be sent you by 
Dr. J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton street, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

He wil lalso mail you five days free 
treatment. You will at once see that 
it is a wonderful remedy, and as it 
only costs one dollar for the regular 
treatment, it is within the reach of 
everyone. It is not necessary to send 
any money — simply send your name 
and address and the booklet and free 
trial package will be mailed you im- 
mediately. 




your little 
darling against croup 

Thousands of lo vi ng parents are to-day 
mourning the Joss of the little ones 
who were suddenly snatched away by 
cruel Croup. 

So sudden and so treacherous 
is this disease that we cannot too 
strongly urge every mother to keep 
ca hand for instant use a jar of 

KrCroupandCIiyp 
*J Pneumonia tJ/\L I L* 

for outward application it should be ap- 
plied as soon as the least cold develops. 
It will promptly allay all imflammation 
and prevent croup through inhalation 
and absorption. No drugs to take, 
they but help clog up the breathing 
organs and prevent the immediate 
relief the lungs require. 
At your druggist'* or by mail. 
25c, 50c, $1.00 
Economy suggests 
the dollar size, 

\ ick's Family Remedies Co. 
Greensboro, N. C. 




Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 1st, 1912 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by H. A. Hayes, Superintendent 



ONLY A BABY 

Only a baby small, 
Dropped from the skies; 
Only a laughing face, 
Two sunny eyes. 
One chubby nose. 
Only two cherry Hps, 
Only two litle hands, 
Ten little toes. 

Only a tender flower, 
Sent us to rear. 
Only a life to love, 
Wihile we are here. 
Only a baby small, 
Never at rest, 
Small, but how dear to us 
God knoweth best. 

— Mattias Barr. 



TIGHT TIMES 

We needed that fifth Sunday collec- 
tion to be large. For more than three 
months, since our annual conference, 
our receipts for support have not been 
quite half enough to pay our expneses. 



SOME SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

In some Sunday schools the super- 
intendents postponed the collections 
for a more favorable day; and some 
others took the collections on the fifth 
Sunday and on another day also — for 
good measure. Truly, love finds a 
way. 



HURRAH FOR HIGH POINT 

A telephone message this morning 
brines the srlad news that Washing- 
ton Strppt Sundav school. High Point, 
takes five hundred dollars stock in 
our school building and rhapel. The 
stock is distributed as follows: 

The Baraca Class $200.00 

The Phiiat^ea Class 200.00 

W. T. Kirkman's Class 100.00 

Now that the High Point Building 
is finished this stock In our school 
building and chapel is put in as good 
Methodist measure. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLFCTIONS RE- 
CEIVFD BY H. A. HAVES, SUPT. 
FOR WEFK FM^ING JAN. 
27, 1912 

G. T. Morsran. Concord S. S., TJwhar- 
rie Charee. $3.18: H. A. Dunham, Hav- 
wood Strpet S. S., Havwond Street 
Charee. $2.00; A. L. Stanford. Hen- 
d°r=onville S. S., Hendersonv'lle Ch., 
$5.00: Marcus Briles. Mt. Gi^arl. S. 
S.. Randolph Charge, $1.77: J. R Fver- 
hardt, Fhpneezer R. S.. Dinwood 
Chnree. $2.00: A. T.. McConnell. Wphb's 
Chqnpl. Rock Sprites Charge, $1.00: 
T/. P. Fckard. Mt. Plpas^nt S. S.. Rock 
Serines Charge. $1.10: Geo. K Burns, 
C^ar Hill S. S.. Ansonville Charee. 
$?.0n: C. J. Scott. Wedineton S. S., 
Wpddineton Charee, 9(1.05: T. H. 
Brown. Bellview S. S.. Murphv Charee. 
$.16: Mrs. J. R. McLpHand, Murnhy S. 
S.. M"mhv Station, $8.15: G. M. Ev- 
ans. F"irview S. S.. F^irvipw Charet*. 
$1.00: S. M. Ashnrv. Zion S. S.. Mor- 
gaiton Charee. $2 12: C. .T. Goodman. 
Olivet S. S., Concord Charge, $7.15: J. 
M. Sr-arh^ro. As^eboro S. S.. Ashphoro 
P+ation. $2R7- K C. Fov. Central S. R.. 
Mt. Airv Station, $8.48 : W. K T.ed- 
weii. Calvarv S. S., Calvarv Charge, 
$8.82: D. A. Oaviov, Delta S. S.. Dan- 
bnrv Charge. $1.14: F. H. B<>eson, 
Cracp R. R.. Ors^p and T,ih°rtv Charee, 
$8.P2: Total. $50.fifi. TWal collpctlons 
rpportpd to r^tp for Fifth Sunday in 
December, $452.64. 

Cash 

F. P. Black, offence. $1.25: Dnthp- 
S. Griffin cffp'-lne. $8.10 ; W. a.. r**-.ne, 
F^ro<5t Hill Church. Concord Charep. 
$7Kn: Rot. w. R. Halo?!. Rtqniv Cre°k 
Chareo. $5.00- Rpv. W. Jj. Dawson. W. 
Grppnphoro Charep. $4.00; A. L. Stan- 
ford. Hpndersonville Charge, $23.55. 
Total, $44.40. 



REPORT OF JOHN F. KIRK, FOR 
WEEK ENDING JANUARY 
20, 1912 

Paid on Open Subscriptions 

Concord: Miss Cooper Miller, $5.00. 
Cherryville: W. J. Dellinger, $3.00. 
Fallston: Dr. E. A. Houser, $25.00; 
Port Mills, S. C: W. C. Howie, $5.00. 
Greensboro: Mrs. Florence G. Field, 
$1.00. High Point: J. E. Kirkman, 
$100.00. Lawndale: Mrs. E. A. Alex- 
ander, $2.00; S. A. Parker, $5.00. Le- 
noir: Mrs. O. M. Goforth, $2.50. 
Mocksville: Miss Bettie Linville, 
$1.00. Monroe: W. B. Brown, $5.00; 
Joseph Hinson, $2.50. Shelby: R. M. 
Laughrldge, $5.00. Total, $162.00. 

Paid on Notes 

Concord: W. B. Ward, $2.50: E. C. 
Turner, $10.00; J. B. Sherrill, $50.00; 
W. B. Bruton, $25.00: R. A. Brower, 
$5.00; J. M. Sills, $10.00: B. Frank 
Mills, $5.00; A. G. Odell, $12.50. Hen- 
iersonville: W. E. Shipman, $2.50. 
Total, $122.50. Total on subs, $162.00. 
Grand total, $284.50. 



SURPRISED BY THE PREACHERS 

It has been said that "fellow-feeling 
makes us wondrous kind." We are 
c urpriscd at our prpacher brethren. 
They know by painful experience how 
embarrassing it is to provide for their 
own small families when their salar- 
ips are not paid in until the end of the 
vear, and sometimes not paid thpn. 
We had thought that these nreacb.pr<?, 
of all folks, would svmnathize with 
us In our efforts to provide for a fam 
Pv of twpntv-flve ti^es as laree as 
that of the averaee familv, and that 
+hpy would rpspond to our earnest 
"leas that thpv ta^e the collections 
'or our Children's Home earlv in the 
vear. Perhans It is to be exnlained 
bv the fact that "misery loves com- 
nanv." 

Howpvpr that mav be It is hard to 
be treated like a Methodist preacher's 
f-»*T>llv. We slncprplv hono that our 
Methodist peonle will do bpfter bv thp 
nreachers and that the preachers will 
do better by us. 



THE LIFE WORTH LIVING 

Tt f«. becoming bptter undprstoo* 
+T, at lifo Is wor^h living onlv as we 
"lorlfv G"d and blpss our fpllowmen. 
"'prvine Him who hath redeemed W° 
and "reaving music for the rest" 
= "oiild ken us biisv and hannv all oir 
f'avg. A life of pa=e and luxurv is a 
rliooTane to humanity and a contra- 
dlptlon to Chriot'anitv. Iioving ser- 
vice for ^cd and humanity is the nob- 
lest ambition that any heart can 
choose. 



THE LAST FIFT HSUNDAY 

The fifth Sundav in Decembpr was 
a dav of sevpre weather. Attendance 
at Sundav school was s^all. and the 
collections for the CMldr-en's Homp 
spem to have been cut down more 
than half. 



HIGHER IDEA" « IN ORPHANAGE 
WORK 

The last few decades have been 
charactprized bv a wonderful growth 
in all linps of humane activitv. In no 
line has thp deveiopmpnt bpen more 
r a nid t^an that of work in b°half of 
the destitute. The Ideals which pre- 
vailed twentv-flve years ago among 
thoop wpn soueht to imprnvp the coti- 
dit'pns of thp unfortunatp havp almost 
entirely di«annpared. and new and 
hle^er idp'ls have taken their p'raps. 
As a result of this growth the insti- 
tution is eiving pla^e to the home. 
Those who were active in the work 
vears aeo wpr° nromnted bv a de«ire 
to heln the unfortunatp in some wav, 
but they had no well defined ideas 
of what should be done. They were 



prompted largely by pity for the un- 
fortunate, and a desire to provide in 
some way, if possible, for their phy- 
sical needs. The tendency was to 
take in every deserted child, every 
sick and orphan child, every waif and 
castaway. Often children and adults 
found shelter under the same roof ana 
were often allowed to mingle freely 
together. The sick and feeble-mlndea 
and the criminal were gathered into 
one family. There was little or no 
thought of the necessity of segrega- 
tion. As a result diseases often spread 
through these Institutions and took 
the form of constant epidemic. Sore 
eyes, for instance, was a chronic dis- 
ease in the old type of institutions. 
The whole plan was that of a common 
poorhouse. In many institutions the 
children were dressed in uniforms as 
a matter of economy. Added to this, 
as the result of the lack of intelligent 
svstematic support, poverty often pre- 
vailed. It Is little wonder that the 
public mind became prejudiced against 
such Institutions. The general Im- 
pression was that the orphan's home 
was little better than no home at all. 
The people were want to say "poor 
orphans", or "poor child." "It is so 
sad it has to go to the orphans' home." 
Rome of this prejudice is still linger- 
ing. This is due, doubtless to the 
fact that manv people do not realize 
that the old-fashioned orphans' home 
is very largely a thing of the past. 
Those who are engagpd in the work 
today are not movpd primarilv bv 
pity for the parentless child. Their 
first thoueht is not merely to meet 
t^e necessities of his animal exist- 
ence. Their service is prompted bv 
a desire to serve the race, the nation 
the church. Their first thought is the 
culture and training of the children. 
The criminals are cared for in a Hasp 
bv themselves. Almost everv well an- 
pointed home has its isolation ward 
or hosnital for eiek and diseaspd chil- 
dren. Fach child has its own clothine 
and is taught to take care of its own 
possessions. Thev are no loneer d°alt 
with en mas=e. but as individual souls. 
T.evo abounds in the ho^es todav. The 
child in the ideal orphans' home of 
the twpptieth century is searcplv 1po« 
tpnderiv cared for and intellleentlv 
pr>d lovinelv trained for the rea^za- 
tlon of the beef that is within hi^ 
than is the child who Is reared In the 
bosom of the familv home. — Exchange. 



OUR OWN 

We have careful thoughts for the 
stranger, 

And smiles for the sometime guest, 

^ut oft for "our own" the bitter tone, 
Though we love our own the best. 

— Selected. 



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Stop the Cough — Remove the 
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THE DOCTOR'S "SHEET ANCHOR" 

"Kbopt Anchor" H nn expression fre- 
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•lie rcmerlv nn which they place the 
"in In rtcpe>nrl"ncp In treating a disease. 
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if flrav's Ointment. It Is my sheet an- 
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srannlatlon. and blood polsnn. You may 
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Gray Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 



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COMPLETE SERMONS 

Preached by the lending ministers of the 
United StRt- s and Great Britain are pub- 
lished monthly in the 

PULPIT OUTLOOK 

Send 25c for one year's subscription to 
DOWNEY&CO., Pubs. 1008 A ch St. Philadelphia, Pa. 



February l«t, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 





THE REMARKABLE SCHOOL- 
HOUSE 

"You are going to go to school in 
the most remarkable school-house in 
the United States," remarked Uncle 
Rob, as he put Mildred on the little 
burro that was to carry her the mile 
and a half to school. It was only four 
months before that Mildred had c ome 
to New Mexico, and it seemed very 
queer to be riding to school on a 
funny little long-eared burro, and to 
be able to see jack-rabbits and prarie 
dogs on the way. She asked Uncle 
Rob if he meant that, but he only 
shook his head and laughed. 

"You'll have to find out for your- 
self," he finally replied. "Ask Miss 
Wilson if she knows why the school- 
house is the most remarkable one in 
the United States." 

Miss Wilson, when Mildred reached 
|the small frame building and told 
"what Uncle Rob had said, was as 
much mystified as Mildred had been. 

"The most remarkable in the United 
States," she repeated wonderfully. 
"It is because we have ten little girls 
and boys from all parts of the coun- 
try?" 

When Mildred came home she ask- 
ed Uncle Rob if that were the reason, 
but her uncle laughed and shook his 
head. 

"Guess again," he chuckled. "I'll 
tell you, — if any one can find out be- 
fore the end of the term, I will give 
the school a fine new map of the 
United States to hang on the wall." 

"We must set our wits to work," 
Miss Wilson cried when she heard 
that, "for we need a new map badly." 

"Maybe," suggested Mildred, "it's 
because we can stand in the front 
door and look at mountains in Mexi- 
co. 

"No," Miss Wilson replied, "because 
there are other school-houses here 
where one can do the same thing." 

Several weeks passed away and 
they were still wondering. The chil 
dren hunted through the geographies 
in hopes of finding something unusual 
about the place where the school 
house stood, and they studied their 
■histories to find out if any great 
battle had been fought there. Miss 
Wilson said she never had scholars 
who gave as much time to geography 
and history as these did. 

One day, while she was hearing a 
spelling lesson, she suddenly exclaim 
ed, Oh!" and then laughed at the 
astonished faces of her pupils. 

"You will have to make me stay- 
after school for speaking out loud,' 
she smiled, "but it just came ovei 
me like a flash why we are so re 

They crowded around her at recess 
time, begging her to tell them, but 
she only smiled mysteriously and 
shook her head. "Keep on guessing a 
little longer," she said. "Next Fri 
day afternoon, if no one has found 
out by that time, I will tell you, just 
before school closes." 

It was an exciting week. The chil- 
dren searched the ground around the 
school-house and asked all the old 
residents if they knew of any reason 
why the school-house was remarkable. 
Friday afternoon came at last, how- 
eer, and none of the children were 
any wiser about it. They could hard- 
ly wait for Miss Wilson to tell them. 



"Did you ever see the water run off 
after there had been a rain?" she be- 
gan. The children shouted "Yes." 

"Where did it run, Mildred?" was 
her next question. 

"Down the hill away from the 
school-house, of course," answered 
Mildred. 

"Do you think the water that runs 
down the west side of the school- 
house and the water that runs down 
the east side go to the same place?" 
Miss Wilson continued; but before 
she had thime to say any more one 
of the boys jumped to his feet and 
waved his hand frantically for per- 
mission to speak. 

"Well, Robert," she laughed, "tell 
us." 

"The water on the west side would 
run into the Pacific ocean if it went 
far enough, and the water on the oth- 
er side would go into the Gulf of Mex- 
ico. We are on top of the Continen- 
tal Divide. I remember now that 
father told me so once." 

"That is just it," answered Miss 
Wilson as the children began to clap 
"Hurrah for our new map." — Annie 
Louise Berry, in Sunday School Times. 



A WORD TO MOTHERS 

If I might write only one more sen- 
tence during mji life, it would be this: 
Let the mothers of this land be the 
chosen confidents and companions of 
their daughters. There is something 
wrong in every mother, how good so- 
ever she may be, whose young daugh- 
ter cannot lay her head on her lap 
and, without fear of reproach or re- 
pulse, give expression to her full 
thoughts. That mother may, or may 
not, approve her daughter's wish or 
opinion; she may think it premature, 
or every way unadvisable: but, oh! 
'he relief and safety to that daughter, 
^hat she may "tell mother!" Let thp 
rwo talk it over together, as young 
companions do — honestly and frankly. 
— New York Ledger. 



A SPLENDID TONIC 

Cora, Ky. — Mrs. Iva Moore, of this 
place, says, "I was so weak, I could 
hardly walk. I tried Cardui and was 
greatly relieved. It is a splendid ton- 
ic. I have recommended Cardui to 
•nany friends, who tried it with good 
results." Testimony like this comes 
unsolicited, from thousands of earnest 
women, who have been benefited by 
the timely use of that successful tonic 
-nedicine, Cardui. Purely vegetable, 
mild, but reliable, Cardui well mer-its 
its high place in the esteem of those 
who have tried it. It relieves women's 
pains, and strengthens weak women. 
It is certainly worth a trial. Your 
druggist sells Cardui. 

"IN THE NANTAHALAS"— Price $1.00 
single copy. Clubs of five copies for 
$3.50 if ordered direct from 

MRS. F. L. TOWNSEND, 
Leaksville, N. C. 

3REATLY REDUCED RATES TO 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., AND RE- 
TURN VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
ON ACCOUNT OF LAYMEN'S MIS- 
SIONARY MOVEMENT OF THE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES, FEBRUARY 6th- 
8th, 1912. 

On account of the above occasion the 
Southern Railway will sell round trip 
:ickets from all points to Chattanooga, 
Tenn., at greatly reduced rates, tickets 
>n sale February 4th-5th and 6th witn 
anal return limit Wednesday, 13th. 1912. 

The following round trip fares will ap- 
ply from points named: 

Charlotte $11.80 

Concord 12.35 

Salisbury 11.70 

High Point 12.70 

Greensboro 13.15 

Davidson 10.65 

Statesville 10.90 

Winston -Salem 12.55 

Rock Hill 11.60 

Hickory 9.95 

Low round trip tickets from all other 
points on Southern Railway. For further 
information, schedules, Pullman accom- 
modations, etc., apply to nearest agent, 
or write, 

R. H. DeBUTTS, 
Traveling Passenger Agent, 
Charlotte, N. C. 



Ask 

Ask your doctor how often he prescribes an alcoholic stimulant 
for children. He will probably say, "Very, very rarely." Ask 
him how often he prescribes a tonic for them. He will probably 
answer, "Very, very frequently." Then ask him about Ay er's 
non-alcoholic Sarsanavilla as a tonic for the young. 



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Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 1st, 1912 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON V— 
FEBRUARY 4, 1912 



The Wise Men Led by the Star. 
Matt. 2. 



GoZden Text — Look unto me and be 
ye saved, all the ends of the earth; 
for I am God, and there is none else. 
Isa. 45:22. 



The Mind of the Wise Men 

This lesson is a study in two types 
of mind. The first is the mind of the 
wise men, and the distinguishing thing- 
about this type of mind is that it is 
ruled over by a great ideal. The wise 
men were haunted by high hopes. 
They dreamed noble dreams. The call 
of the lofty never sounded in vain in 
their ears. They gathered up the 
wisdo mof their own land for their 
mental treasure house. As best they 
could they gathered the wisdom of 
other lands. In all of this they were 
pressed with a great hunger. They 
wanted something better than they 
had found. They wanted something 
nobler than the religious life of their 
own land could give them. They were 
often disappointed. They were 
broughat face to face with many dis- 
illusioning facts, but they kept on 
believing; they kept on seeking. Some- 
where tbey would find that which an- 
swered to the deep hunger of their 
souls. Such an attitude of mind pre- 
pared them to appreciate such por- 
tions of the Hebrew Scriptures as fell 
into their hands. They possessed an 
inner kinship with the Messianic 
hope. 

When they learned about it they 
made that hope their own. It was a 
strange mental life they led. Their 
lives were fed by various conceptions 
from the thought of their own people 
and great thoughts they had garnered 
from the life of the world out&ide — ■ 
all these combined in what would 
doubtless seem to us an impossible 
fasbion. Through it all their great 
hope was guiding them. Through it 
all God was preparing them for that 
which was to come. They were pil- 
grims led by hungry hearts before' 
they became pilgrims guided by a 
star. 

The wise men believed in ideals. 
They took seriously the very best 
thev knew. Do we have the spirit of 
believeing in the best and distrustins 
the worst? Are we willing to allow 
the deepest hunger of our hearts to 
find a voice? Do we believe in that 
voice and are we willing to put it in 
command of our lives? With all that 
is perplexing and confusing in modern 
life, have we this mind in us, which 
was in the wise men — the mind to 
keep believing and hoping, and seek- 
ing until the whole need of our lives 
is satisfied? 

The Mind of Herod 

The second type of mind to "which 
our lesson introduces us is different 
enough from that represented by the 
wise men. It is the mind of Herod. 
This selfish and cruel worldling could 
never have understood the way in 
which the wise men looked at life. If 
he had spoken frankly he would have 
called them visionaries. He would 
have expressed high scorn for their 
impracticable qualities. When he did 
come in contact with them he was 
too shrewd to say these things, but 
there is no doubt about his thinking 
them. Long ago Herod had fought 
out the battle with ideals and the 
ideals had been completely vanquish- 
ed. The thing a man must do accord- 
ing to Herod's view of life, was to 
make a place for himself in the world 
and hold it at whatever cost. The 
main thing was personal success and 
prosperity and power. Everything 
else must be sacrificed to that. Re- 



ligion might be very useful in a way. 
If by patronizing it you could get a 
firmer hold on people and make your 
own position more secure, well and 
good. Principles were tools to be used 
as long as they were useful and cast 
aside whenever they were not. What- 
ever opinion or line of action was ef- 
fective in securing the end in view 
was to be seized and used with vigor. 
The end in view was always Herod's 
security and Herod's advancement. 
He had a very active mind. He kept 
it at work at all time. It was full of 
astute schemes. It was the restless 
servant of his ambition. The voice 
of his inner life had not been encour- 
aged to speak in many a year. 

Herod was not the onl yman of his 
type. There have been many Herods. 
There are many men today of the es- 
sentially hard and selfish secularity 
which characterized his mind. At 
times they are amazingly successful. 
At times it seems as if they have dis- 
covered the method by which a man 
makes the most out of this world's 
life — at least as far as externals go. 
They often acquire great -wealth. They 
come to positions of far-reaching mas- 
tery in commerce. They reach sta- 
tions of commanding political in- 
fluence. Their brains are instruments 
of trained efficiency in many direc- 
tions of practical activity and we can- 
not fail to recognize their strength. 
These metallic lives, "which run like 
well-oiled machinery, and are used 
with relentlessly selfish purpose, con- 
stitute one of the great problems of 
the world in which we live. 

The Mind of Heaven 

When we have clearly seen the sig- 
nificance of the type of mind repre- 
sented by the wise men and that rep- 
resented by Herod, some important 
questions emerge. Which type is real- 
ly at home in the world? Does the 
universe take sides in this battle of 
types? Will heaven fight for Herod 
or for the wise men? Is the world built 
along the line of the thought of the 
seers from the East or along the line 
of the shrewd, selfish strategy of the 
oily and astute king? Is there a place 
for unselfish ideals in the system of 
things. 

The story of the "wise men gives a 
very concrete answer to these ques- 
tions. That answer is the star. The 
real meaning of the star is that heaver 
is on the side of the idealists. The 
svstem of things provides a home for 
the dremer of great dreams. The 
stars in their courses fight for the 
poetry and the aspiration and tihe 
moral and spiritual meaning of life. 
Many men laughed at the seers from 
the East. Many men scorned them. 
They had one great comfort. That 
comfort was the star. 

The really short-sighted man, after 
all, was Herod. He prided himself on 
his practical sagacity. He felt com- 
placent over his power to estimate 
the probabilities in a given situation 
and put himself on the winning side. 
In the greatest matter of all 'however, 
he had failed just here. The forces 
of heaven were fighting on one side. 
Herod was on the other. He was pos- 
sessed of real astuteness in getting- 
at the minds of men. He had no ca- 
pacity at all for getting at the mind 
of God. 

And it was just at this point that 
the wise men proved wisest of all. 
They listened to the call of that which 
spoke most deeply in their lives. They 
followed the glem of that which 
seemed most clear and pure and 
bright. They risked everything in 
the same noble ideals and lofty hopes, 
and in doing so they discovered that 
heaven itself was on their side. The 
stars were with them. The mind of 
the wise men was in a dim but real 
sense a reflection of the mind of God. 
Through perplexity and confusion and 
struggle they were loyal to the best 
which was presented to their own 
minds, and so they discovered the 
mind of heven. 

A Strange World for a LittZe ChiZd 

The end of the wise men's journey 
wa a home where they found a little 



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child. With awe and joyous rever- 
ence they presented their gifts to Him. 
Here was something concrete and 
definite and tangible. They had been 
men of lofty dreams. Their first re- 
ward was the sight of the star, their 
second the sight of the little Child, a 
symbol that all they dreamed and hop- 
ed had become actual flesh and blood. 
Their hearts leaped as they thought 
of the future which was locked up in 
the life of this little Child. 

But it was a strange world for a 
little Child, so helplessly dependent. 
Already enemies were plotting against 
its life. Not simply adoring devotion 
sought out the house which sheltered 
Mary and her infant Son. Hate and 
greed bent dark, evil eyes on Bethle- 
hem. There was no end of forces in 
the world hostile to the Child and all 
for which His life would stand. Could 
He be protected from harm? Would 
He be allowed to grow up into stal- 
wart manhood and do his work? 
What could a sturdy carpenter and a 
?entle, deep-eyed woman do against 
the forces arrayed for the destruction 
of this Child? 

The answer is that heaven was not 
only on the side of the wise men; it 
was also on the side of the Child. The 
protectors of the Infant of Mary were 
not kindly human friends, but all the 
celestial powers. It was not the arm 
of Joseph, but the arm of God whioh 
was to avert danger through the help- 
less years of infancy. It was God's 
word after all, and no harm could 
come to the little Child watched over 
by the heavenly care. 

To the man of sympathetic mind 
this often seems a strange world for 
any little child. What evils wait to 
attack it! What wrongs are ready 
to entrap it! These things may well 
make us eager to work and fight to 
to make the world a fit place for child- 



hood. In the meantime we may bt 
sure that the Father who cared for 
the Child of Bethlehem is not forget- 
ting any one of the little ones dwell- 
ing in the world today. — New York 
Christian Advocate. 

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1000 Radish 
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500 Cabbage 

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BLACK MOLASSES 

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$7.00 PER A RREL 
Write for fu 1 Information regarding ration, etc. 
J. J. GARVEY CO., N«w Orleans, L> 



February 1st, 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SECRETARY'S 
REGISTER 



The best record book ou fh« 
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Simple and easy to understaun 
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Neat and substantially bound, 
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Inside printed on good white 
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The one year book is divided 
Into five sections, viz.: Four 
full sections, containing 28 pages, 
and one section of 8 pages. 

Each one of the 28-page sec- 
tions is devoted to one quarter, 
two pages for each of the thir- 
teen Sundays, and two for the 
Quarterly Report. Each report 
consists of two pages, one for 
statistical report, one for finan- 
cial. These are facing pages. 

The 8-page section, which 
comes last, has two facing pages 
for yearly report, statistical and 
financial; the remainder is de- 
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Ths two-year book consists of 
two one-year books in one bind- 
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PRICES: 

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Two Year Book - - 1.50 

POSTPAID 

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THE CHAS. M. STIEFF 

PIANO 

OF TODAY 

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This is because we are producing 
an instrument which, in every point 
of piano excellence, surpasses even 
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We court investigation, criticism 
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Write for booklet. 

CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the piano with 
the sweet tone. 

FACTORY: BALTIMORE, MD. 

FOUNDED 1842 

SOUTHERN WAREROOM 

5 West Trade St. 
Charlotte, .... N. C. 
C. H. W1LMOTH, Manager 



Epworth League 



Editor of League Columns 
Miss Blanche Johnson 
435 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, 



N. C. 



MEETING OF CONFERENCE CABI- 
NET 

On Monday evening, January 22nd, 
jhe W. N. C. Epwortn League Confer- 
ence officers met in Broad Street, 
o'hurch, Statesville, N. C, for the pur- 
pose of outlining a program and mak- 
.ng plans for the Assembly to be held 
June 3rd-7th. One session of the Cab- 
inet was held on Monday evening and 
another on Tuesday morning and 
when the time came for adjournment, 
the work was practically finished 
with the exception of securing speak- 
ers and workers for the various sub- 
jects and departments of the work. 
Those in attendance were President, 
R. E. Atkinson; Treasurer, C. M. 
Pickens; District Secretary, J. Frank 
Armstrong; Junior Superintendent, 
Mrs. L. E. Brown; the League editor 
and a few visitors, including Rev. 
Harold Turner, Dr. H. K. Boyer and 
Mr. E. G. Gaither. The conference of- 
ficers reached a high state of enthus- 
iasm at the Assembly last June and 
having retained it up to the present 
time, were ready to go to work with 
willing hearts and minds and every 
phase of the program was carefully 
planned, and with a view of making 
our next Assembly one of the greatest 
possible help and inspiration to all 
who attend. The Statesville people 
were delightful in their hospitality 
and the meeting was a most pleasant 
one. 



11:00 a. m.- — 3rd Department. Liter- 
ary, When and How to Study. 

11:30 a. m. — Fourth Department, Mis- 
sionary. Practical Home and For- 
eign Missionary Work. 

2:30 p. m. — Rally Service. Election 
of Officers. 

3:30 p. m. — Recreation. 

Evening sermon on Evangelism. 

Friday, June 7th 

6:00 a. m. — Sunrise Prayer Service. 

8:00 a. m. — Institute classes, Junior 
Work and Mission Study. 

9:00 a. m. — Devotional. 

9:05 a. m. — First Department. Diffi- 
c ulties and How to overcome them. 

9:35 a. m. — Second Department, 
Charity and Help. ""The sick." 

10:00 a. m. — Third Department. "So- 
cial." 

10:30 a. m. — Annual Consecration 
Service. 



PROPOSED PROGRAM FOR W. N. 
C. EPWORTH LEAGUE ASSEM- 
BLY 

Monday Evening, June 3rd 
Annual Sermon. 

Tuesday, June AtYi 

9:00 a. m. — Devotional exercise. 

9:15 a. m. — Welcome address. Re- 
sponses to address of welcome. 

10 a. m. — Organization. 

10:20 a. m. — Reports from District 
Secretaries and Local Chapters. 

11:00. a. m. — Address. Junior Wtork. 

2:30 p. m. — Rally service. Round Ta- 
ble discussion. 

3:30 p. m. Recreation. 

Evening — Address, Boy Scouts. 

Wednesday, June 5th 

6:00 a. m.— Sunrise prayer service. 
8:00 a. m. — Institute classes, Junior 
Work and Mission Study. 
9:00 a. m — Devotional exercises. 
9:10 a. m. — First Department. Model 
Devotional Service. 

9:45 a. m. — Second Department. The 

Stranger. Flowers. 
10:15 a. m. — Junior Work. How to 

organize. 

10:45 a. m. — Third Department. Lit- 
11:30 a. m. — Fourth Department, Ad- 
dress, Mission Study. 

erary. What to study. 
2:30 p. m.— Rally Service Round Ta- 
ble discussion. 
3:30 p. m. — Recreation. * 
Evening Address — Our Children's 
Home. 

Thursday, June 6th 

6:00 a. m. — Sunrise Prayer Meeting. 
8:00 a. m. — Institute classes. Junior 

Work and Mission Study. 
9:00 a. m. — Devotional exercises. 
9:15 a. m. — First' Department. The 

Leader and His Preparation. 
9:45 a. m.— Second Department, 

Chanity and Help. "The needy." 
10:15 a. m. — Junior Initiation. 



MATHEWS 

We are rejoiced to learn that an 
Epworth League was scheduled to be 
organized at Matthews, N. C. on the 
19th. Inst. We hope to have a re- 
port soon. Rev. L. P. Bogle, pastor 
at Matthews, has on hand several 
hundred photographs of Rev. Zensky 
Hinohara, a Japanese preacher of our 
church. Rev. Hinohara is now in 
school in New York City. He is a 
graduate of Trinity College, and is 
known to many of our people. He has 
to meet his expenses at school, as 
well as support a wife and children 
in Japan, where he has been doing a 
fine work, and where he expects to 
return in two years. Mr. Bogle is 
offering the photographs for sale at 
10 cents each or $1.00 per dozen, all 
the proceeds to go to Rev. Hinohara, 
who can use the funds to good advan- 
tage just now. We hope that many 
of the young people who read these 
columns will order copies of the pho- 
tograph from Rev. Bogle, thereby as- 
sisting him in his labor of love for 
Rev. Hinohara, whom he is anxious 
to help in his effort to complete his 
education. 



NEW CHAPTERS 

The December reports of Chapters 
chartered by the Central office shows 
a godly number of new Chapters and 
re-organized Chapters. We note how- 
ever, that a large number have not 
yet paid the ten cent assessment to 
the Central office. This is an impor- 
tant obligation that we should meet 
promptly, and without fail. Let all 
W. N. C. Leagues that have not paid 
up for last year do so promptly. We 
know of no place where a little money 
brings bigger results. 



You will be glad there have been 
some rainy days in your life. If there 
were no storms the fountains would 
dry up, the sky would be filled with 
poisonous vapors, and life would cease. 

The difference between a Christian 
and a heathen is, one fashions him- 
self after his God while the othet 
fashions his god after himself. — Se- 
lected. 

You will be glad you brought smiles 
to men, and not sorrow. 



LATEST WONDER OF THE AGE 

Religious differences are gradually 
fading away. Christians are coming 
closer and closer together. The lat- 
est wonder is the breaking down of 
immersion sectarianism by Mahaffey's 
book on Baptism. It proves beyond a 
doubt, from the only Bible St. Paul 
ever owned, that sprinkling was the 
mode. Hundreds of thousands have 
read the book and now see the truth 
as plain as daylight. Single copy 16c; 
$1 a dozen, by Mahaffey Book Co., 
Clinton, S. C. Order a supply at once 
and let the good work go on. 



Mistaken Diagnisis— Doctors 
Guess Wrong Again 



About five years ago I wrote to you 
that I had been a terrible sufferer 
from kidney and bladder troubles, and 
that my physician informed me that 
my left kidney was in such condition 
that there was no hope for my recov- 
ery. I was advised to try your Swamp- 
Root as a last resort, and after taking 
four fifty cent size bottles, I passed a 
gravel stone which weighed 10 grains. 
I afterwards forwarded you this grav- 
el stone. Have had no return of any 
trouble since that time and cannot 
say to much in favor of your wonder- 
ful preparation, Swamp-Root, which 
cures, after physicians fail. 

Very truly yours, 

F. H. HORNE, 
Route 3, Box 30. Roseboro, N. C. 



Letter to 
Dr K !mer & Co., 
B<ngh«mton, N. Y. 



Personally appeared before me, this 
31st day of July, 1909, F. H. Horne, 
who subscribed the above statement 
and made oath that the same is true 
in substance and in fact. 

JAMES M. HALL, 

Notary Pubic. 




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to compete. JOHN A. 
YOUNG & SONS, Nurserymen, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



John White & Co 

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Established 1837 
Highest market price 

S;furs 

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JUST LIKE HERO 
1 ^1 V-/1 ^1 J-j page sixteen 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 1st, 1912 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws 
and Regulations in the postofflce in 
Greensboro, N. C, as mall matter of 
the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.50 

Six months 7b 

To all preachers of the Gospel at Jl.uu 
per year. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION, (Inc.) 

D. B. Coltrane, President Concon. 

Rev. J. R. Scroggs, V-Pres Charlott. 

N. L. Eure, Secretary Greensbon 

W. G. Bradshaw High Poin 

T. G. Hoyle Greensbon 




ASH EVILLE DISTRICT 
D. Atkins, Presiding Elder 
Weaverville, N. C. 

Central Feb. 4 

Haywood Feb. 4 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 
J. R. Scroggs, Presiding Elder 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Marshville, Murshville Feb. 3-4 

Polkton, Polklon Feb. 4-6 

Uiiiunville, Zion Feb. 10-11 

Derita, Deri La Feb. 17 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT 
J. E. Gay, Presiding Eider 
Frankln, N. C. 

Judson Circuit, at Judson Feb. 3-4 

Murphy Circuit, at Roger s Feb. 10-11 

Murphy Station Feb. 11-12 

Waynesvllle Circuit, at Dedford s, 

Feb. 17-18 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT 
W, R. Ware, Presiding Elder 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Second Round 

Spring Garden St., 11 a. m Feb. 4 

Pomona Ct., Zlon, 3 p. m Feb. 4 

Greensboro, Centenary, 11 a. m., Feb. 11 
E. Greensboro, Whitsett, 4 p. m., Feb. 11 
Greensboro, West Market St., night, 

Feb. 11 

Reldsvllle, night Feb. IS 

Rurfin Ct., Lowe's Feb. 18-19 

Wentworth, Mt. Carmel Feb. 24-25 

Randleman and N. Naomi March 2-3 

Uwharrie, Mt. Shepherd March 9-10 

Denton, Clarksburg March 16-17 

Coleridge March 23-24 

Ramseur and Franklinville, Ramseur, 
„ , , March 23-25 

Randolph Ct., Pleasant Hill, March 30-31 

Asheboro Ct., West Bend April 6-7 

Asheboro Station, at night .. April 7-b 
Pleasant Garden Ct., Pleasant Garden, 
April 13-14 

Liberty Ct., Old Randolph.. April 14-15 

MORG ANTON DISTRICT 
R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 

Table Rock, at Oak Hill Feb. 3-« 

Morganton Station, at night ..Feb. 2-4 
Morganton Circuit, at Gllboa, Feb. 10-11 
Connelly Springs and Rutherford Col- 
lege, at Harmony, Feb. 17-lfc 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT 
R. M. Taylor, Presiding Elder 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Second Round 

Stokesdale Feb. 10-11 

Walnut Cove, Pine Hall Feb. 17-18 

Madison and Mayodan Feb. 18-19 

Rural Hall Feb. 24-26 

Danbury March 2-S 

Summerfield. Lee's Chapel March 9-lc 

Mt. Airy Circuit, Epworth ..March 16-17 

Mt. Airy Station March 18-19 

East Bend, Mt. Pleasant March 23-24 

Yadklnville, Yadkinville March 24-25 

Dobscm. Pleasant Ridge March 30-3) 

Jonesvllle April 6-1 

Elkin April 7-* 

Pilot Mountain April 13-14 

Stoneville April 20-21 

Spray and Draper April 27-28 

Leaksville April 28-29 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT 
M. H. Vestal. Presiding Elder 
North Wllkesboro, N. C. 
Wllkesboro Station Feb. 4-6 



8ALISBURY DISTRICT 
J. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Salem Feb. 10-11 

New London at New London ..Feb. 17-18 



SHELBY DISTRICT 
S. B. Turrentlne, Presiding Elder 
Shelby, N. C. 
Second Round 

Shelby, Central Feb. 4 

Shelby Circuit, Sharon Feb. 10-11 

Stanley Creek, Iron Station ..Feb. 17-18 

Llncolnton Station Feb. 18 

Lincoln Circuit, Marvin Feb. 24-25 

Crouse, Pleasant Grove March 2-3 

Cherry ville, Bethlehem March 3-4 

Ozark and West Gastonla ..March 9-10 

Gastonia, Main Street March 10 

Lowell and Dallas, Dallas ..March 16-17 
McAdenville March 16-17 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT 
Lee T. Mann, Presiding Elder 
Lenoir, N. C. 
First Round 

Mooresvllle Ct., Falrvlew Feb. 3-4 

Davidson Feb. 4-6 

Mooresvllle. Feb. 11-12 

Second Round, In Part 

Iredell, Olin Feb. 17-18 

Stoney Point, Plsgah Feb. 24-25 

Alexander, Hlddenite (night) ..Feb. 25-26 

Hickory Ct., Houck's Mar. 2-3 

Hickory Station Mar. 3-4 

Catawba, Bethlehem Mar. 9-10 

Race Street Mar. 17-19 

Broad Street Mar. 17-18 

Rock Springs, Webb's Chapel.. Mar. 23-24 



WAY N E8V I LLE DISTRICT 
L. T. Cordell, Presiding Elder 
Waynesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

.lill River, Avery's Creek Feb. 3-4 

ines Creek, Fines Creek Feb. 10-11 

.revard Circuit, Kosman Feb. 17-18 

frevard Station Feb. 24-25 

WINSTON DISTRICT 
Plato Durham, Presiding Elder 
Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

~>avie, Hardison Feb. 3-4 

docksvllle Feb. 4-6 

Jooleemee Feb. 4-6 

i<.ernersvllle, Kernersvllle ....Feb. 18-11 
Southslde and Salem, Salem Feb. 11 

Second Round 

Centenary Feb. 18 

West End Feb. 18 

fhomasville Ct., Fair Grove.. Feb. 24-25 

L'homasville Feb. 25-26 

VValkertown March 2-H 

Burkhead March 3 

Korsyth Ct., Shiloah March 9-10 

Jackson Hill, Jackson Hill ..March 16-17 
Karmington, Smith's Grove.. March 23-24 

Advance March 24-25 

Linwood Ct March 30-31 

Nexinston March 81, April 1 



SHE BROKE DOWN ENTIRELY 

Lantz, W. Va— Mrs. Tebe Talbott, 
of this place, says, "I have been trou- 
bled with womanly ailments for some 
time, and at last I broke down entire- 
ly. I got so weak I could scarcely 
walk across the room. Thanks to 
Cardui I improved right off. Now I 
do my housework, and am feeling 
well." During the past 50 years, more 
than a million women have been bene- 
fited by taking Cardui. You must be- 
lieve that Cardui will help you, too, 
since it helped all these others. Car- 
dui is a safe, harmless, vegetable rem- 
edy, of positive, curative merit, for 
women. At drug stores. Try one bot- 
tle. It will surely help you. 

TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND 
BUILD UP THE SYSTEM 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
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taking. The formula Is plainly printed 
m every bottle, showing It Is simply 
quinine and Iron in a tasteless form, and 
die most effectual form. For grown peo- 
ple and children. 50 cents. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

Insurance 



Greensboro, North Carolina 

308 1-2 South Elm St. 

Pbone 163 



THE THIRD ANNUAL NEGRO STATE 
FARMERS' WEEK WILL BE HELD AT 
THE AGRICULTURAL & MECHANI- 
1CAL COLLEGE FOR THE COLORED 
RACE, GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRU- 
ARY 12-17, 1912 

Colored farmers of the state will be 
given the unusual opporunlty this year 
>f being In school for an entire week 
and being instructed by experts from the 
State Department of Agriculture, Ral- 
egh, N. C; and the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. 
C. One whole day will be devoted to 
"seed corn" and will be in charge of 
Mr. C. R. Hudson, State Agent, In charge 
of the Farmers' Co-operative Demonstra- 
tion Work. Bring along a sample of 
your "Seed Corn." On February 17th a 
lemonstration in Sub-soiling by Dyna- 
mite will be given. 

No tuition will be charged and farmers 
will be entertained free while here. We 
will be glad to have you and your friends 
with us the whole week. 
For further Information address 

Director Department of Agriculture and 
Chemistry, 

A. & M. College, Greensboro, N. C. 



ROYSTER FER' 

HITS THE SPOT EVERY TIM 





The explanation is simple; 
they are made with the great- 
est care and every ingred- 
ient has to pass the test 
of our own laboratories; 
theres no hit ormiss^ohout 
Royster Fertilizers. 

Sold By Reliable Dealers Everywhere 
F.S.ROYSTEH GUANO CO. 

SALES OFFICES 

Norfolk.Va. Tarboro.N.C. Columbia.SC/ 
Baltimore, Md. Montgomery, Ala. 5partanbur$,S.C. 
Macon, Qa. Columbus, Ga. 




&SSCS 



Now look here, all you weak-eyed, spectacle-wearing 
readers of this paper, you've just got to quit wearing your 
i dim, scratchy, headache-producing, sight-destroying spec- 
Itacles at once, for this is what generally causes cataracts i 
land other serious eye troubles. You must lay aside those 
fold spex right now and I'll send you a brand new pair ofl 
|my wonderful "Perfect Vision" glasses absolutely free ofl 
I charge. 

—These "Perfect Vision" glasses will enable you 
to read the very finest print in your bible even by 
the dim firelight — 

—These "Perfect Vision" glasses will enable you 
to thread the smallest-eyed needle you can lay 
your hands on — 

— These "Perfect Vision" glasses will enable you 
to shoot the smallest bird off the tallest tree top 
on the cloudiest days — 

— These "Perfect Vision" glasses will enable you 
to distinguish a horse from a cow at the greatest 
distance, and as far as your eye can reach — 
Now please remember these wonderful "Perfect Vision" 
glasses are free— absolutely free to every reader of this 
paper— not a cent need you pay for them now and never. 

I therefore insist that you sit down right now— 
this very minute — and write me your name and address 
at once, and I will immediately mail you my Perfect Home 
Eye Tester and a four-dollar cash certificate entitling you 
to a brand new pair of my wonderful "Perfect Vision" 
glasses absolutely free of charge — just as cheerfully as 1 
have sent them to nearly all the other spectacle-wearers 
in your county. 

Now, friend, please don't be lazy, but get out your 
writing paper or write me your name and address on the 
below coupon at once — that's all. 

Address :^DR. HATJX — 
— The Spectacle Man — 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Note :— The above house if per- 
fectly reliable. 



— DR. HAUX- 
—The Spectacle Man — 
—ST. LOUIS, MO.— 
Fleaee eend your abeolutely free offer at once. 

dame — — 




Postofflce.. 
•W R_. 



..State 



February 1st 1912 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Our Dead 



MARY E. SPRY 

Mary E. Spry was born June 18th, 
1834, died Dec. 8th, 1911, age 77 yeara, 
5 months, 20 days. Sister Spry hai. 
been a member of Conooid Methodis 
Episcopal Church, South, for nior. 
than 60 years. Four children survi* 
to mourn their loss. Sister Spry w« 
a modest, faithful Christian and dit 
in great peace. 

A. J. Burrus. 



FOSTER 

Mrs. Laura A. Foster was born Nov 
7, 1838, died Dec. 15th, 1911, aged 7c 
years, 1 month, 8 days. She had beea. 
a widow for 41 years. Had been l 
member of the Salem Methodist bpis 
copal Church, Soutn, for 61 yeara. 
Two childien, one son and one daugh- 
ter, survive her. Her's was truly tht 
Metnedist preachtr s home, bhe was> 
a loyal Christian woman. Her enu 
was peace. 

A. J. Burrus. 



ALLEN 

Mary E. Williams was born Febru- 
ary 24, 1832, was married to W. E. Al- 
len Nov. ly, ls58, and passed to Uk 
great beyond January 13, 1912. In 
eany girlhood sne professed saving 
faith in Christ and united with the 
M. E. Church, bouth, remaining a 
faithful, consistent member of the 
same to the aay of her going hence. 
Sister Allen had been for a year a 
shut-in, the result of an accident. Her 
place m the home is on this account 
ail tne harder to fill. She leaves to 
mourn her departure two sous, Gay 
L. and Robert H., and two daughters, 
Misses Kittie and Addie. The Chris- 
tian example of the niotner bears fruit 
in the lives of her oaspring. May 
sustaining grace be theirs in this, 
their hour of trial. 

C. S. Kirkpatrick. 



COLEMAN 

Henry M. Coleman was born July 
14, 1890, died Dec. 25, 1911, being 21 
years, 6 months and 11 days old. His 
mother died when he was quite young. 
He was then taken by his grandfather, 
Geo. A. Coleman, and was brought up 
under the influences of a Cniistian 
home. In August, 1910, he was 'hap- 
pily converted and joined the churca. 
Before dying he gave abundant testi- 
mony that he was going to be with 
the Savior. May all his relatives and 
friends, which are many, strive to 
meet him in the better land. He was 
laid to rest in Hayesville cemetery 
on Dec. 26, 1911, by Rev. J. M. Fowler, 
of the M. E. Church, and the writer. 
Sleep on! 

There is no death! The stars go 
down 

To rise upoE some other shore; 
And bright in heaven's jeweled crown 
They shine forevermore. 

J. A. Marr, P. C. 



HARRISON 

Mary Lee Tyler was born in Rock- 
ingham county, N. C, on April 19, 
1834, was married to William M. Har- 
rison, Sept. 6, 1848, and died at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. G. W. Irv- 
ing, near Stoneville, N. C, Dec. 9, 
1911. 

Sister Harrison was the mother of 
thirteen children, eight daughters and 
five sons; seven daughters and four 
sons, with her aged husband, survive 
her. 



Early in life she was converted and 
joined the Metnodist cnurch and was 
a loyal, faithful memuer until God 
took her. She loved her church and 
was always a faithful attenuaut upon 
its sei vices. Her home was always 
optn to the Methodist preacher. Many, 
no douot, rememuer with pieasuie tue 
-appy hours sptnt in her lioapnauie 
-.uiiie. 

fane was always devoted to the best 
.nteiesis of her family and nothing 
.«er stemed too difficult for her to un- 
dertake for their happiness and de- 
. ^lup'tuent. 

She was a kind neighbor, ready at 
all times to help the sick, comtort the- 
joi rowing and cheer tlie sad. She was 
.lappy when she could help, and make 
^tuers happy. She rests from her la- 
bors, and her works do follow her. 

W. F. Yvonible. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas the Heavenly Father has 
renioveu iro uiuu iuug ana pamiui 
uillbbS our Kluu-utai t-ull anu Oeioveil 
uliHuer, j^li /jimiiifci ii^iui, luel'eiole Lie 
n leauiveu, 

in at, 'mat in his death we havu 
lost a valuta Luenioer oi our i^uaiier- 
iy L-oiuereuce, anu a suoug sap^i icr 
of tne Cttuicn; one, inuecu, wuu never 
ceaoeu to care lor Lne interests oi the 
cnuicn wnue his heaiui peiujitteu hull 
to uo so; tuat we greaiiy miss mm m 
tne kiuduess of ills t-unsuau apii'ii 
and geutie behavior towaid all ikis 
Dm i.hi en. 

Second, That, we as a Conference, 
exteuu our tun sympathy to tue iam- 
ny in this, tneir gieat loss, and tuai 
we indulge tne strung nope anu oeiiel 
tnat au tne suneriugs are over anu 
mat eternal heaita anu uiiss snail De- 
nis poiuon, anu aiso tnat we enueavor 
lo cuiuvate more and more tne kind- 
ness of disposition wnicn he possess- 
ed and his love tor every one. 

Third, 'ihat a copy oi these resolu- 
tions ue sent to our Advocate tor puo- 
licauon, a copy sent to tne lauiiiy anu 
one be put in tne minutes of tn.is 
Conference. 

J. E. Brewer, 
J. C. Ripple, 
W. A. .ferryman, 
J. T. Raueage, 

Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, in the providence of God, 
the genial spirit of our Oeloved Broth- 
er, David C. Ader, has returned to God 
who gave it; and whereas we, tne 
members of the yuartaeny Conference 
of Davidson Circuit, feel greatly the 
loss of his kindly presence in our 
meetings and of his mature wisdom 
and fatherly counsel in tne important 
concerns of the church. 

'therefore be it 

Resolved, 1st. That we have lost a 
most valued, and what seems to us, 
an indispensable man from the service. 

Resolved, 2d. Ihat we as members 
of this Conference, strive to emulate 
his worthy example of zeal for the 
Master s cause and patience in his 
sei vice. 

Resolved 3rd. That this Quarterly 
Conference extend to the stricken 
family in their sudden and sore be- 
reavement, its profound sorrow and 
sympathy; and that we share with 
them the sustaining hope of renewed 
fellowship with him in the blessed 
beyond. 

Resolved 4th. That a copy of this 
paper be sent to the North Carolina 
Christian Advocate for publication, a 
copy sent to the widow of the deceas- 
ed and also a copy be put on our min- 
utes. J. E. Brewer, 
J. C. Ripple, 
W. A. Perryman, 
J. T. Ratledge, 

Committee. 




Tm GOO! 



Milam is guaranteed under the 
pure food and drugs law to can- 
tain no opium, morphine, stryc'.i- 
nino, mercury, potash or other 
dangerous or habit forming 
drugj. Thus you take no chances 
with your health when you take 
Milam. 




^°OD. BONE AND SKI* 



You take r.o chances with your 
mon y either, for if you buy a 
course of six bottles and are 
not benefitted you can get your 
money back for the asking. 

No dispute no argument— you 
are the judge. 






I w ; ll always take p'easure in recom- 
mending Milam for Uric Acid troubles. 
C. T. ISancsdale, former U.3. l'ostma^tcr, 
Danville, Va. 

For nearly eight years I suffered with 
rheum itijm— at time s unable to walk. I 
am taking Milam with great benefit, as 
lam now able 1 1 walk and suffer no pain. 
Mrs. Ira R. Preston, Abingdon, Va. 

RVumatism affected my heart until I 
could not lie down without such pain that 
I could hardly bear it. Milam h \s made 
me feel like a new wo nan. Mrs. J. P. 
Brown, 63o N. 8th St., kichmond, Va. 

For 13 years I wis confined to my bed 
tha greater part of the time with rheuma- 
tism. Milam has b.' :n a Godsend to me. 
I now walk a'iout m/ farm— the swelling 
has left my limbs and joints reduced to 
normal rze. F. L. Gristie, R. F. D. 1, 
Chocowiii,ty, N. C. 



I have been a great sufferer with 
rheumatism and for sever 1 years un- 
able to atte-.d to r / duties continu- 
ously. Six bottles cf Milam made a rew 
ma.i of me. Claude Curling, 0.0 E. Main 
St., Norlolk, Va. 

I sie"t over $1,003 for rheumatism with 
no bene 'it whatever until I tried Milam. 
It has done all you claim for it in rr.y 
case. I. II. W^de. corner Church and 
Lee Sts., Norfo.k, Va. 

For a long-standing and aggravated 
case of rheumatism I am glad lo say I re- 
ceived more benefit from the use of Mi'air. 
than a 1 the other treatment extending 
over a penod rf ten years. C. P. Ban er. 
with \7. M. Ritter Lumber Co., Hunting- 
ton, V/. Va. 

Since taking G bottles of Milam my :'. eu- 
matio.a is entirely gone, my comule.-ion 
and apatite i ..proved— I wouldn't tal.'e 
toOfortha e n "d >t has done me. A. Me 
Bride, Danville, Va. 



in 



It will do you no good to put it off— noth 
to gain, all to lose. Act today. 

Your druggist has Milam or can get it very quickly from any drug jobb 
THE IV] I LAM MEDICINE CO., Inc., Danville, Va. 



Cotton Must Have Plant Food, 

and this plant food must be the right kind. The very elements which 
the Cotton Plants need — Phosphoric Acid, Nitrogen and Potash — are in 

Virginia-Carolina 

High-Grade 

Fertilizers 

Cotton Plants must be supplied with all needed elements of plant 
food as growth unfolds wants. These Fertilizers should be put in the 
ground before planting, of course, and frequent applications of Virginia- 
Carolina Fertilizers or Top Dresser should be made during the growing 
period of the plants. Thus, when the plants grow stronger — demanding 
more food — the food is right there in the soil, ready to be taken up and 
used by the plants. 

Write now for a free copy of our 1912 FARMERS' YEAR BOOK. 



SALES OFFICES 



"Richmond, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Durham, N. C. 
Alexandria, Va. 



Charleston, S. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Shrevcport, La. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 




CHAS. W. MOSELEY, M. D. 

PrastlM Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach apd Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
Over Farlsa- Klutz Drue Company 
Greensboro, N. C. 
OHI«e phone 671 Residence IMC 

Office: 181 S Kim Street 
Moure: 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCHES, 8TERLINQ SILVER 
AND PLATED WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assort- 
ment of fine Pocket Books, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the oldest 
-eadlng Firm In the city. Everything Is 
guaranteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

LEADING JEWELERS 



Housewives 



and Grocers See 
Hero on Page 1 6 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 1st, 1912 



A CHEERFUL GIVER 

1 was in the toy department of a 
large store, admiring the various me- 
chanical devices wnich always attract 
me at Christmas time, when 1 heard a 
footstep beside me. Glancing around, 
1 beheld a little newsboy wnose can- 
vas bag hung quite empty at nis side 
and tigntly clutched in his little palm 
was a twenty-five cent piece. He was 
no more than a ragged little street 
urchin, but something in his glance in- 
terested me, so I watched. 

Just then another boy, not more than 
seven years old, appeared. He, too, 
was a newsboy; but, unlike the other, 
he had several unsold papers in the 
bag thrown over his shoulder. The 
two seemed to know each other, and, 
after informal greetings, began to dis- 
cuss the toys laid out before them. 
They examined them all, now ex- 
claiming in delight, now finding fault. 
The smaller boy had thirty cents in 
his grimy little hand, and in the 
unintelligible jargon of the streets, 
they talked of their intended purchas- 
es. 

At last a clerk, after deciding that 
they really meant to buy something, 
hurried up, and in a gruff voice asked 
them what they wanted. The smaller 
one spoke first, pointing out a toy 
boat that wound up. The clerk said it 
was fifty cents. 

"W'y," exclaimed the little fellow, 
"I fought ev'ry-t'ing was marked 
down! " 

The other gave a glance at his com- 
panion, then resolutely told the clerk 
to wrap the boat up — he would help to 
pay for it. As the two passed out, the 
older said, — 

'Aw, dat's all right, Bobbie; I didn't 
want de engine very bad, anyway." 
And he left the store grinning, and 
apparently just as happy as the small- 
er boy. 

But his eyes were filled with tears. 
— Marjorie D. Cole, in St. Nicholas. 



SECRET OF HAPPINESS 

It is a great and blessed secret, and 
one which everybody ought to learn, 
to know how to do without things. 
"Are you puzzled to know which arti- 
cle to buy?" said a gentleman to his 
neighbor, who was admirng the 
Christmas goods in a store window. 
"No," said the neighbor, who was a 
man of moderate means; "I was just 
thinking how many beautiful things 
there are in this great store that I do 
not actually need, and that I can 
easily do without." What a wise re- 
flection that was! If we could all face 
the store window, including all other 
material attractions, in the spirit of 
that persuasion, we would each be that 
embodiment of godly contentment 
which is great gain. A man's happi 
ness does not depend upon what he 
possesses, but upon what he is in him- 
self. As a man thinketh in his heart, 
so he is. Minor privations count for 
naught in a life hid with Christ in 
God. We really cannot have all the 
things we want, as even some rich men 
have discovered. There are some 
things on the temporal plane of life 
that are very desireable, and which 
we feel sure would add to our comfort 
and usefulness, but we simply cannot 
afford to want them, much less get 
them. Our trouble is that we want 
more than we need, and sometimes 
worry because we cannot get it. — Re- 
ligious Telescope. 



l A NEW KiND OF COW i 

A little boy seeing an elephant for 
the first time, shouted: 

"O pop, look at the big cow with 
her horns in her mouth eating hay 
with her tail!" 



You will be glad that you have met 
all the hard things which have come 
to you with a hearty handshake, nev 
er dodging out of them, but turning 
them all to the best possible account 
— Exchange. 



What Made the Dutch Famous 
for Their Coffee? 

Why are Holland's coffees served in 
nearly all the hotels, restaurants and homes 
of Europe? The answer is simple. 

During the Napoleonic Wars, a strict blockade of the 
continent of Europe was maintained and all importations of 
coffee, tea and cocoa ceased. This forced the Dutch to use 
chicory as a beverage, which soon came into popular use. Sc 
good did it taste, that when the war ceased 
they were loth to give up their chicory. So 
they compounded chicory with coffee, pro- 
ducing the good old Dutch Coffee so justly 
famous. Not only did this compound produce 
that rich aroma and flavor, but it # was 
found that chicory added to the whole- 
someness of the drink. 




COFFEE and 

CHICORY 

The Royal Beverage {100% Goodness) 



Hero is this exquisite combination of pure high grade coffee and the 
best chicory. But Hero differs from the Dutch compound in one respect. 
The chicory is processed, That is, by a method of our own, the'ehicory is so 
compounded with the coffee as to bring out more fully the rich creamy 
flavor of the chicory and the delightful aroma of the best coffee. The result 
being a beverage even surpassing the famous old Dutch Coffee in flavor 
and vvholesomeness. 

Hero is Clean: Roasted by a new process that is clean and sanitary. 

Vastly superior to the old way of roasting. Hero is packed in sealed tins 
to preserve its superior strength and flavor and to protect it from dirt. 

Economical: Hero Brand Coffee and Chicory saves the housewife 

about half on her coffee bill. Chicory increases the goodness of the drink, 
but reduces the cost. Its strength makes it go further. Use one-half as 
much Hero and get a better breakfast cup. 

ASK YOUR GROCER 

You really will never know coffee satisfaction until you have tried 
Hero. Ask your grocer for it. If he doesn't keep Hero, have him order 
t for you. 



Potter Sloan O'Donohue Company 1 \ a C wYopk l afy p 



These trade 




erv package 

iIET FOR 
DIABETICS 



eamafa'sm, Obesity 

Uric Acid 

eading grocers. 

Y..II.S.A. 



Personal 
Cleanliness 




TYREE'S ANTISEPTIC POWDER. 

Cleans and heals immediately, all irritations 
of the mucous membrane, particularly infected 
and catarrhal conditions, as "well as mild, and 
severe sore ihioats, cankers, sores, ulcers, boils 
prickly heat, perspiring, sore and tender feet, 
sweaty odors under the arms, poison oak. 
scratches, burns, cuts, insect bites, etc. Never 
hurts or harms. 

Our littlo booklet and a sample sent free. For 
sale at all reliable drug stores, or by mail direct, 
twenty-flve cents and one dollar a box. 
if. S. TV ft EE Chemist, Washington, 0. ft 




For the customer this 
granite is unsurpassed— 

BECAUSE: It does not crack or chip, 
smut or weather. Its durability 
is unlimited. Its beauty is match- 
less. • Its contrast when lettered 
is so great as to make the inscrip- 
tion readable from a distance. 
If you are interested in a monu- 
ment for any purpose, specify 
Winnsboro Blue Granite, 
and if your dealer can't sup- 
ply you, write us direct. 
WINNSBORO GRANITE 
CORPORATION 
RION, s. c 



mum 

"THE SILK OP THE TRADE" \ 

For the dealer this granite 
is unsurpassed— 

BECAUSE: The patterns are perfect. 
It is uniform and easy to work. It 
saves freight/labor and loss. It can 
be had in any size, at any time. It 

satisfies his customer, and forms a 

base for future business. 

There is no other Blue Granite 
in the world that will stand 
the test and give as uni- 
versal satisfaction as 
Winnsboro Blue. 

WINNSBORO GRANITE 
CORPORATION 
RION. S. C. 



GREENSBORO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



WHEN YOU NEED A PIANO 

First find the oldest, and most reliable concern in your community handling 
same, then let them assist you in selecting your piano, as the majority of 
the best musicians in this state have done, by telling you what quality of 
piano to buy and what make of piano will give you the best service at the 
price you desire to pay. In this way make us responsible, then you can go 
home and rest assured that you have made the best possible investment 



233 South Elm St. 



A. P. FRAZIER, GENERAL MANAGER 

The Oldest Piano House in the County 



Greensboro, N. C. 



THE TOWNSEND BUGGY CO. 

OUR ENTIRE LINE OF 

VEHICLES AND HARNESS 

AT A GREAT REDUCTION TO MAKE 
ROOM FOR OUR SPRING 
STOCK. 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MINISTERS 



COME TO THE PLACE 

Where yon always get better (hoes for less money. 
Out of Ike high rest district. 

Corner Market and Davie Streets 

A. L FORDHAM & CO. 



THE SMITHERMAN CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 



SPECIALTIES: Caned Gndi. CoHett, Tea. Bhe 
Label are our Smdby's 



309 9mA Darie St. 



GREENSBORO, I. C 




Glascock Stove & Mfg. Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Manufacturers 

"Carolina" and "Plymouth" 
Cook Stoves 

The stoves you can always trust. 
Every stove absolutely guaranteed. 
If your dealer does not carry our 
stoves in stock, please write us 
direct for catalog, giving us your 
dealer's name. 



Crescent Cleaning Works 




MRS. C. T. GODWYN, Proprietress 
209 West Market St. GREENSBORO, N. C 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING & DYE WORKS 

1121-2, 114, 116 Fayetteville St., Greensboro 
Phones 176 and 633 

Genuine French Dry Cleaners and 
Fancy Dyers 

Oat of town orders fires prompt atteitin. Write 
tor booklet and price Gat. Ageab wasted 



Huntley-Stockton-Hill Co. 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS 

Day Phone 762 Night Phone 1442 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Our Spring Style 
Book 

For Spring 1912 will soon 
be ready for mailing. If 
you are not on our list 
send us your name. 

Meyer's 

N. Co Largest Department Store 
GREENSBORO. N.C. 




Hardwedd Mantels 

THAT PLEASE 

Grates aid Tiles 

THAT HARMONIZE 



Get Our Catalogue. Free to 
those who are interested. 



Odell Mantel Co., 

(Owned bj 9de£ Hardware Co.) 
GREENSBORO. - - - N. C 




Bookkeeping and Shorthand taught by skilled specialists In all departments. Either coarse SIS. 
Combined 165. Enroll now and save 815 to 825 on your eonrse. 

Address the School at GREENSBORO. N. C 



Helms' Babyoline 

An External Remedy for Old and Young 

For Pneumonia, Bronchitis, Croup, Colds, Whooping Cough, 
Soreness in Chest, and Cold in Head. Physicians 
prescribe it and get best results. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 25c for two-ounce jar 

J. D. HELMS, Manufacturing Chemist 
WINSTON, n. c 



Fir art Aid. to 
Bus ij Farmers 



T 



1 H E farmer's champion helper is an I H C 
Gasoline Engine. On thousands of farms 
throughout the country, they are kept busy 
every day, running the cream separator, churn, pump, feed 
grinder and cutter, fanning mill, thresher, wood saw, grindstone, 
washing machine, dynamo for electric light plant, and many 
other machines. They are saving work, time, and money at every 
turn of the wheel. 

I H C Gasoline Engines 

are built for hard, steady work and years of it. They 
are simple, dependable, economical. They are 
always ready to save and make money for you. 



An I H C For You 



ft 



The size and style I H C engine you 
need depends on the work you have 
for it to do — and on the particular condi- 
tions which surround your locality. Any size 
or style will not do. You must get the right 
engine to get the right service. 
AH I H C gasoline engines are marvels of 
strength, reliability, and durability. They run 
smoothly, year in and year out. They make and 
save money every time they are used, and whatever 
style and size engine you want is in the I H C 
line, which includes: Vertical type — 2, 3, 25, 
and 35-horse power; horizontal — 1 to 50- 
horse power; semi-portable— 1 to 8-horse 
power, portable— 1 to 25-horse power; 
traction — 12 to 45-horse power; sawing, 
pumping, spraying, and grinding outfits, 
etc. Built to operate on gas, gasoline, 
kerosene, distillate, or alcohol — air-cooled 
or water-cooled. See the I H C local dealer, 
or, write direct today for our new catalogue. 

International Harvester Company 
of America 

CHICAGO (Incorporated) USA 



IHC 

Service Bureau 

The purpose of 
this bureau is to 
furnish farmers 
with information 
on better farming. 
If you have any 
worthy questions 
concerning soils, 
crops, pests, ferti- 
lizers, etc., write to 
the IHC Bureau 
and learn what our 
experts and others 
have found out 
concerning: those 
subjects. 



r 



A GOOD BANK FOR YOU 

With its large capital and its splendid equipment of its many departments, the 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

places its unexcelled facilities at the disposal of Banks, Corporations, Firms and 
Individuals and offers them every accommodation consistent with sound banking. 

Accounts both large and small, in or out of the city, are cordially invited, with 
the assurance of receiving equally careful attention by the officers of this institution. 



The constant aim of the management is to make the accounts of depositors of 
the utmost value; and upon this basis your account is respectfully solicited. 



American Exchange National Bank 



CAPl/^ $400,000.00 

Branch at &*! h Greensboro 





ommercial btationerv) 



WE would like to send you our "Samples and Prices of Com- 
mercial Stationery." In it we show only a few of our 
styles and prices. Should you want something different, drop 
us a line and we will be glad to submit an estimate. Our 
plant is adequately equipped. We can print anything from a 
visiting card to a poster 3x4 feet in size; from an envelope to a 
college annual, and do it well. Give us a chance and we will do 
the rest. €| Let us show you how well we can handle your work. 

WRITE TODAY TO 

THE ADVOCATE PRESS 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



North Carolina 



/»"' V Of c 

*0. OK%^€ 



Christian Advocate 

ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 



Thursday, February 8, 1912 














A Umitral f mob 



IS THERE not a time of the year when the church, and for 
that matter, the world, expects a revival? It was once so. 
Has that idea vanished ? And if so, what has taken its 
place? fj It used to be expected that the close of the year 
and the opening of the new year would be seized as such a 
period for summoning the attention of the people to their relig- 
ious state and to the stern facts of destiny beyond the grave. 
The thrilling and fateful word eternity used to mean some- 
thing. One would think to note the neglect of the word now- 
adays that the fires of retribution had been put out, so there 
was nothing any longer left but to debate the values of higher 
criticism, or municipal betterment, or the beauties of Brown- 
ing, or some of the ethicial considerations which have in them 
no Gethsemane and no Golgotha, no Lamb for sinners slain, 
no heaven and no hell. f| Have we left no revival period ? If 
not, what has taken its place? Clubs, societies, pleasures, the 
parlor lamp, the evening paper, the plan for getting another 
dollar — anything, everything but the anguish for souls which 
which must so soon be in eternity. ^ And every day the 
funeral procession winds along the street, and in a few days 
the hearse will back up in front of our door and the men 
with white gloves will carry our coffin uot of the house, and 
the undertakers will lay the flowers on our grave— and we 
shall be where the chance to save souls will be gone — clean 
gone — and what will we say then, in the fierce light of eternity? 

— Central Christian Advocate. 
















GREENSBORO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



WHEN YOU NEED A PIANO 

First find the oldest, and most reliable concern in your community handling 
same, then let them assist you in selecting your piano, as the majority of 
the best musicians in this state have done, by telling you what quality of 
piano to buy and what make of piano will give you the best service at the 
price you desire to pay. In this way make us responsible, then you can go 
home and rest assured that you have made the best possible investment 



233 South Elm St. 



A. P. FRAZIER, GENERAL MANAGER 

The Oldest Piano House in the County 



Greensboro, N. C. 




Glascock Stove & Mfg. Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Manufacturers 

"Carolina" and "Plymouth" 
Cook Stoves 

The stoves you can always trust. 
Every stove absolutely guaranteed. 
If your dealer does not carry our 
stoves in stock, please write us 
direct for catalog, giving us your 
dealer's name. 



THE TOWNSEND BUGGY CO. 

OUR ENTIRE LINE OF 

VEHICLES AND HARNESS 

AT A GREAT REDUCTION TO MAKE 
ROOM FOR OUR SPRING 
STOCK. 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MINISTERS 



Crescent Cleaning Works 




MRS. C. T. GODWYN, Proprietress 
209 West Market Si. GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Huntley-Stockton-Hill Co. 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS 

Day Phone 762 Night Phone 1442 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COME TO THE PLACE 

Where yon always get better shoes for less money. 
Ont of the high rent district. 

Corner Market and Davie Streets 

A. E. FORDHAM & CO. 



THE SMITHERMAN CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 



SPECIALTIES: Canned Goods, Ccffees, Teas, Blue 
Label are our Standby's 



309 South Davie St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING & DYE WORKS 

1121-2, 114, 116 Fayeltevilie St., Greensboro 
Phones 176 and 633 

Genuine French Dry Cleaners and 
Fancy Dyers 



Out of town orders given prompt attention. Write 
lor booklet and price list. Agents wanted 



Our Spring Style 
Book 

For Spring 1912 will soon 
be ready for mailing. If 
you are not on our list 
send us your name. 

Meyer's 

N. C.'s Largest Department Store 
GREENSBORO, N.C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SECRETARY'S REGISTER 

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teen Sundays, and two for the Quarterly Report. Each report consists of two pages, one for 
the statistical report, one for financial. These are facing pages. 

The 8 -page section, which comes last, has two facing pages for yearly report, statistical 
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Prices: One- Year Book, $1 .00; Two- Year Book $1-50, Postpaid 

THE ADVOCATE PRESS, G ™ ORO 



ESTABLISHED 1855 



h. m. blair. Editor Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South $1,50 p« Ann™ in Advance 



Volume LVII. GREENSBORO, N. G, FEBRUARY 8, 1912 Number 6 



Methodist Preachers and Sporting Clubs 

<3t/ Bishop John C. Kilgo 



At a recent meeting of the Association of Metho- 
dist Preachers in Durham, the question of them 
uniting with all the other pastors of the city in a 
union meeting under the direction and in the build- 
ing of the Y. M. C. A., was brought before them 
for their action. They decided that as loug as the 
Y. M. C. A. of Durham kept a pool room and en- 
couraged such gaming, they would not unite in 
such a meeting. Any person of moderate intelli- 
gence knows that the Methodist church has al- 
ways stood for a high and vigorous standard 
against all forms of worldliness that are injurious 
to sound spiritual growth, and to ask a body of 
Methodist preachers to approve one of the most 
hurtful forms of worldliness was nothing short of 
impertinence. Of course, as is the unfortunate habit 
of the Y. M. C. A. when anything it does is not 
fully approved, these preachers became the subject 
of spiteful resentment. 

I have no disposition to dignify the petulance and 
ignorance of novices in matters of theology and 
ethical instruction by any sort of reply. I write- 
this article not to reply to any criticism of the 
Methodist preachers in Durham, but to utter a word 
of warning to the host of Methodist people, and 
other Christians, who sincerely desire to do good 
and to train their own sous in the soundest lines 
of Christian conduct. Originally the Y. M. C. A. 
was a most excellent organization. It was design- 
ed solely to train youth in religious leadership and 
religious life, and as a youth I found it very help- 
ful. Under its direction many of us learned to lead 
in public prayer, to conduct religious meetings, to 
talk with each other about our spiritual interests, 
and otherwise cultivate our Christian characters. 
But the spirit and the efforts of it have changed. 
It has become chiefly a club with the trend wholly 
toward a sporting club. The last report of the Sec- 
retary of the Durham Y. M. C. A. states that during 
the year 1,500 attended the various religious meet- 
ings while 5,000 attended the pool rooms. I have 
seen several reports of other Y. M. C. A. organiza- 
tions and they show about the same proportion be- 
tween the sporting interests and the religious in- 
terests. Any reader of the daily papers has ob- 
served the large emphasis put on the activities of 
the basket ball, bowling, tennis, running, and other 
athletic teams in comparison with the religious ac- 
tivities. Many of these athletic activities are mor- 
ally innocent and otherwise helpful, but they do 
not need the sanction of the Christian religion to 
promote them. Ancient paganism brought athletics 
to a high degree of perfection. Christ did not die 
to establish play grounds in the world, and the 
reverent regard for our holy religion will not be 
promoted by pool tables, nor will the sense of 
spiritual fellowship with God be deepened in youth 
by substituting a game of pool for an hour of pray- 
er. 



The Y. M. C. A. is one of the most expensive 
public organizations among us. It requires enor- 
mous outlays of money for buildings and current 
expenses, and these funds are asked from the mem- 
bers of the various Christian churches. The poli- 
cies adopted in a campaign for raising the money 
to construct buildings often bring uncomfortable, 
if not compelling influences to bear on leading 
churchmen. Unusual methods combined with un- 
usual enthusiasm sweep a community into unusual 
obligations. However, it is going beyond just 
limits to require that preachers whose congrega- 
tions have been freely canvassed for funds and 
for members should remain silent if they do not 
approve all that may be done with the investments 
made by their people. The ministry has rights 
and obligations, at least the Methodist ministry 



has, which cannot be farmed out to others, and I 
may say that the Methodist preachers as a rule will 
not turn their people over to the exploitation of 
outside organizations, nor will they quietly consent 
to have their young people taught doctrines and 
standards of ethics which according to Methodist 
standards are hurtful. 

I wish to warn earnest and pious fathers and 
mothers among the Methodist people against many 
of the modern fads which are promulgated in the 
name of religion. It is a painful fact that in our 
times there is a great exploitation of the Christian 
religion and every serious person should examine 
and try the spirits lest he be ■carried into strange 
paths. It is common enough to be told that re- 
ligion should be made "cheerful and attractive and 
entertaining. Unless this is done the church and 
the Christian religion cannot hope to have leading 
influence." And many innocent persons are capti- 
vated by this modern scheme for the salvation of 
religion instead of the salvation of sinners and 
the protection of Christ from hopeless defeat in- 
stead of the protection of the wicked from a hope- 
less doom. But religion is not a joke. Christ did 
not come into the world to entertain people. He 
came to save them, and this is an awful proposi- 
tion, one that has on it the blood of the Lamb of 
God and the penitential agony of the human soul. 
It cannot be revised down to a social function and 
an idle sport. No more destructive heresy can 
take possession of the young mind than the idea 
that the Christian religion does not deal with the 
most tremendous issues of the universe. From 
such a ruinous impression I pray that the young 
people of the Methodist church may be delivered. 

The pool room is a place of idleness and there 
is no worse sin than idleness. It is the one sinful 
atmosphere in which all other sins thrive. And 
it is nothing short of profanity to undertake to 
sanctify idleness by using the name of Christ to 
encourage it. Playing pool in the name of Christ 
is to every reverent soul a repulsive conception. It 
is even worse when youths are encouraged to idle 
in the name of Him who rebuked it in severest 
terms. If religion is designed to teach young peo- 
ple to idle then the less we have the better we will 
be. And it is time to say to every man or organ- 
ization that proclaims in any form a gospel of in- 
dolence that his teachings are both blasphemous 
and cantemptible. 

No one may be surprised at the feeling of sore 
disappointment which honest and good men have 
at finding that what they thought was a donation 
to an effort for the religious welfare of the young 
in their community is only an investment of good 
money in a pool room to which minors are admit- 
ted as well as those not forbidden by the law. 
They were told pathetic stories about the poor 
young men and the strange young man in the city 
who had no home life and was exposed to all the 
floods of evil influences and evil places; they were 
urged to do something for these; they were re- 
minded that their own sons might some day be in 
like circumstances; and many other aspects of 
youthful life were presented with artistic diligence. 
In the end the benefactor comes to learn t